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Old 17-12-2010, 01:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of
your recipe?

TIA,
--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

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Old 17-12-2010, 04:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

In article om,
Janet Wilder wrote:

I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of
your recipe?


Not appreciably. It was fine.

Miche

--
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Old 17-12-2010, 06:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 19:16:25 -0600, Janet Wilder
wrote:

I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of
your recipe?

TIA,


I buy it instead of regular yeast and use it the regular way.

--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 17-12-2010, 07:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast


"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
eb.com...
I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of your
recipe?


It worked OK. I used it a lot when I was making pizza dough in the college
cafeteria decades ago. To me it didn't have that nice yeasty smell and
taste I like from slow rise yeast. It lacked some tang. I don't use it
when I make bread..

Paul


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Old 17-12-2010, 11:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 23:42:38 -0800, "Paul M. Cook"
wrote:


"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
web.com...
I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of your
recipe?


It worked OK. I used it a lot when I was making pizza dough in the college
cafeteria decades ago. To me it didn't have that nice yeasty smell and
taste I like from slow rise yeast. It lacked some tang. I don't use it
when I make bread..

Paul


It is easy to adapt any recipe to give you that flavor, though...just
use less of the rapid rise yeast in it and allow for a longer rise
period.

I do not think I have had regular old active dry yeast in the house in
many years.

Boron


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Old 17-12-2010, 12:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On 12/17/2010 6:43 AM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 23:42:38 -0800, "Paul M.
wrote:


"Janet wrote in message
eb.com...
I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of your
recipe?


It worked OK. I used it a lot when I was making pizza dough in the college
cafeteria decades ago. To me it didn't have that nice yeasty smell and
taste I like from slow rise yeast. It lacked some tang. I don't use it
when I make bread..

Paul


It is easy to adapt any recipe to give you that flavor, though...just
use less of the rapid rise yeast in it and allow for a longer rise
period.

I do not think I have had regular old active dry yeast in the house in
many years.

Boron


I use it frequently.

--
Currently reading: Finals over! Yay for an A in organic chem and a B in
Human Anatomy and Physiology. Now what to read?
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Old 17-12-2010, 02:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On 12/17/2010 12:07 AM, sf wrote:
On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 19:16:25 -0600, Janet Wilder
wrote:

I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of
your recipe?

TIA,


I buy it instead of regular yeast and use it the regular way.

You don't have to raise the temp of the liquid?

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 17-12-2010, 03:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Dec 17, 3:43*am, Boron Elgar wrote:

It is easy to adapt any recipe to give you that flavor, though...just
use less of the rapid rise yeast in it and allow for a longer rise
period.

I do not think I have had regular old active dry yeast in the house in
many years.

Boron



what is the difference between 'instant' yeast and 'rapid rise' yeast?

I still use active dry yeast and proof it.

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Old 17-12-2010, 05:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 07:24:29 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
wrote:

On Dec 17, 3:43*am, Boron Elgar wrote:

It is easy to adapt any recipe to give you that flavor, though...just
use less of the rapid rise yeast in it and allow for a longer rise
period.

I do not think I have had regular old active dry yeast in the house in
many years.

Boron



what is the difference between 'instant' yeast and 'rapid rise' yeast?



Nada, AFAIK. Fleischmann''s uses the terms interchangeably, too.

http://www.breadworld.com/products.aspx

I still use active dry yeast and proof it.


Now you see, that IS a difference. I buy RRY by the pound and
vac-freeze it in smaller packets, then keep an ounce or so in the
fridge in a Tupperware container. I also tend to use fresh yeast or
sourdough starter more often than any sort of dry yeast, so I need
something dry that holds up like iron.

Dry yeast lasts forever in the freezer. I just used up a batch that
was "use by" dated from 2007. If you do not bake frequently, do not
store your yeast in the freezer and/or do not know if your yeast
purchase was made from products stored under ideal conditions, then go
ahead and proof.

Me? I hate to proof. It is 15 minutes that I could have spent in
getting the dough ready. Really, though...I bake breads and yeasted
goods so often, that I can skate blindfolded and backwards with this
stuff. I have few talents, but using yeast is one of them. If you have
ANY doubts, proof before you waste your time and ingredients.

Boron

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Old 17-12-2010, 06:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 08:22:07 -0600, Janet Wilder
wrote:

On 12/17/2010 12:07 AM, sf wrote:
On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 19:16:25 -0600, Janet Wilder
wrote:

I bought a tri-pack of this by mistake. I was going to try to use it but
the directions are different from using regular active yeast and I was
worried that it might change my recipe. Bread can be finicky.

Has anyone used rapid rise yeast in place of regular active dry yeast?
Does bringing all of the liquid (water and oil) to the required
temperature, then adding to the dry ingredients alter the results of
your recipe?

TIA,


I buy it instead of regular yeast and use it the regular way.

You don't have to raise the temp of the liquid?


I treat it just like regular yeast and heat the liquid to 110-115 and
use it like regular yeast. I figure if I ever need Rapid Rise, I
always have it on hand and won't need to make a special trip to the
store to buy it. There's no cost difference, so why not?

--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.


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Old 17-12-2010, 06:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 07:24:29 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
wrote:

I still use active dry yeast and proof it.


I treat it the same as regular, proofing and all.

--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 17-12-2010, 07:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On 12/17/2010 12:12 PM, sf wrote:
On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 07:24:29 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
wrote:

I still use active dry yeast and proof it.


I treat it the same as regular, proofing and all.


Thanks to everyone. I'll just use it with my 110 to 115 recipes then.
I trust you folks.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 17-12-2010, 08:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Dec 17, 9:57*am, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 07:24:29 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags

wrote:
On Dec 17, 3:43 am, Boron Elgar wrote:


It is easy to adapt any recipe to give you that flavor, though...just
use less of the rapid rise yeast in it and allow for a longer rise
period.


I do not think I have had regular old active dry yeast in the house in
many years.


Boron


what is the difference between 'instant' yeast and 'rapid rise' yeast?


Nada, AFAIK. Fleischmann''s uses the terms interchangeably, too.

http://www.breadworld.com/products.aspx

I still use active dry yeast and proof it.


Now you see, that IS a difference. I buy RRY by the pound and
vac-freeze it in smaller packets, then keep an ounce or so in the
fridge in a Tupperware container. I also tend to use fresh yeast or
sourdough starter more often than any sort of dry yeast, so I need
something dry that holds up like iron.

Dry yeast lasts forever in the freezer. *I just used up a batch that
was "use by" dated from 2007. If you do not bake frequently, *do not
store your yeast in the freezer and/or do not know if your yeast
purchase was made from products stored under ideal conditions, then go
ahead and proof.

Me? I hate to proof. It is 15 minutes that I could have spent in
getting the dough ready. Really, though...I bake breads and yeasted
goods so often, that I can skate blindfolded and backwards with this
stuff. I have few talents, but using yeast is one of them. If you have
ANY doubts, proof before you waste your time and ingredients.

Boron


I buy my yeast by the pound and keep it in the freezer. I just put
the liqud and the yeast to proof first while I'm gathering up
everhthing else and by the time I'm ready for it....it's all proofed
and ready. Easy peasy. But you bake probably every day....I only
bake on the weekends if I possiibly can so I don't find it a hassle to
proof the yeast.

BTW I've made that mixed grain bread I came up with from your
suggestion several times now an have given away many loaves to friends
and they LOVE it. It turned out to be a great recipe. Thanks!!
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Old 18-12-2010, 02:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 12:29:18 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
wrote:



BTW I've made that mixed grain bread I came up with from your
suggestion several times now an have given away many loaves to friends
and they LOVE it. It turned out to be a great recipe. Thanks!!


That makes me very happy. You are very welcome.

Boron
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Old 18-12-2010, 05:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Rapid Rise Yeast

In article
,
ImStillMags wrote:

On Dec 17, 3:43*am, Boron Elgar wrote:

It is easy to adapt any recipe to give you that flavor, though...just
use less of the rapid rise yeast in it and allow for a longer rise
period.

I do not think I have had regular old active dry yeast in the house in
many years.

Boron



what is the difference between 'instant' yeast and 'rapid rise' yeast?


There's a good discussion of that he

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/...ke-a-walk-on-t
he-wild-yeast-side/

(it's down a bit)

Isaac


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