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Old 05-01-2007, 01:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer

Hi !

I've been looking for too long for a big deep fryer. The one I could
use to serve 4-6 servings of fries at once. I've tried a lot of models,
but all of them are too small for a big bunch of anything. Even the 4
liters (that often have a small basket anyways) are too small.

Any suggestions without having to change my main electric panel ?

Cost is not an issue.


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Old 05-01-2007, 03:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer



" wrote:

Hi !

I've been looking for too long for a big deep fryer. The one I could
use to serve 4-6 servings of fries at once. I've tried a lot of models,
but all of them are too small for a big bunch of anything. Even the 4
liters (that often have a small basket anyways) are too small.

Any suggestions without having to change my main electric panel ?

Cost is not an issue.



Good thing cost is not an issue, because it will cost a lot to
fill it with oil. Try a restaurant supply store. A big one will
probably need 220 V
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Old 05-01-2007, 03:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
KW KW is offline
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer


wrote in message
ups.com...
Hi !

I've been looking for too long for a big deep fryer. The one I could
use to serve 4-6 servings of fries at once. I've tried a lot of models,
but all of them are too small for a big bunch of anything. Even the 4
liters (that often have a small basket anyways) are too small.

Any suggestions without having to change my main electric panel ?

Cost is not an issue.


Saw one of these at a Kitchen outlet store over the holidays. At 28 qts, it
should fit the bill for 4-6 servings. At 1650 watts if it can fry a turkey
indoors, it ought to be able to handle a bag of fries.

http://www1.epinions.com/pr-Masterbu...s_Turkey_Fryer

KW


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Old 05-01-2007, 08:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 50
Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer


"KW" keith_warrennospamatallteldotnet wrote in message
...

wrote in message
ups.com...
Hi !

I've been looking for too long for a big deep fryer. The one I could
use to serve 4-6 servings of fries at once. I've tried a lot of models,
but all of them are too small for a big bunch of anything. Even the 4
liters (that often have a small basket anyways) are too small.

Any suggestions without having to change my main electric panel ?

Cost is not an issue.


Saw one of these at a Kitchen outlet store over the holidays. At 28 qts,
it
should fit the bill for 4-6 servings. At 1650 watts if it can fry a
turkey
indoors, it ought to be able to handle a bag of fries.

http://www1.epinions.com/pr-Masterbu...s_Turkey_Fryer

KW


Do to careers my husband and I live apart for now. He absolutely RAVEs
about this thing. I wanted one too, but then we'd have 2 when we reunite.
Its really nice size. He says it takes about an hour to get really hot so
plan ahead. It also steams clams, corn, lobster, etc.

Tonia
(I'm a kitchen gadget addict, so I may buy one too, anyway. LoL)


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Old 05-01-2007, 10:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer


Sheldon wrote:


You don't need to change anything and cost is NOT an issue, won't cost
you much... get yourself a large pot with lid and a basket and use your
stove cooktop.

This will do fries faster than you can eat them.
http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-...UTF8&s=outdoor


Hi Sheldon, and thanks for your suggestion. I'm just wondering how safe
if that pot with hot oil ? For the fries to stay crips, the oil has to
be hot, and the thing I dislike about your suggestion might be the
safety of it. What do you think aboutu the fire hazard of such a pot ?

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Old 05-01-2007, 10:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer


KW wrote:

Saw one of these at a Kitchen outlet store over the holidays. At 28 qts, it
should fit the bill for 4-6 servings. At 1650 watts if it can fry a turkey
indoors, it ought to be able to handle a bag of fries.

http://www1.epinions.com/pr-Masterbu...s_Turkey_Fryer

KW


Thanks for the suggestion ! I didnt know a turkey fryer existed ! Looks
like the right way to go. But wont the fries taste funny if its
designed to fry turkeys ? :-)

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Old 06-01-2007, 12:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer


wrote:
Sheldon wrote:


You don't need to change anything and cost is NOT an issue, won't cost
you much... get yourself a large pot with lid and a basket and use your
stove cooktop.

This will do fries faster than you can eat them.
http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-...UTF8&s=outdoor

Hi Sheldon, and thanks for your suggestion. I'm just wondering how safe
if that pot with hot oil ? For the fries to stay crips, the oil has to
be hot, and the thing I dislike about your suggestion might be the
safety of it. What do you think aboutu the fire hazard of such a pot ?


No more or less risk. Also much easier to store the fat, just place
the entire pot in the fridge... and when the fat is spent and it's time
to clean up simply dispose of the grease and wash the pot. For
occasional deep frying at home a pot is the best method.

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Old 06-01-2007, 12:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer

Sheldon wrote:

No more or less risk.


Oh? The purpose-built deep-fryer will have a thermostat
to prevent overheating, cracking the oil, and subsequent
major fire. It will also have a stable footing, compared
to a pot sitting on a stovetop. A big one will have a
spigot for draining the oil safely, rather than tipping
the pot over to pour its contents into another container.


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Old 06-01-2007, 04:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer

wrote:
Hi !

I've been looking for too long for a big deep fryer. The one I could
use to serve 4-6 servings of fries at once. I've tried a lot of models,
but all of them are too small for a big bunch of anything. Even the 4
liters (that often have a small basket anyways) are too small.

Any suggestions without having to change my main electric panel ?

Cost is not an issue.


I bought the Deni Multi-Fryer about a year ago +/- and have been
delighted with it. It slow cooks, boils, is a fryer, bakes and deep
fries. And it's plenny big, Loosey. It'll deep fry 2 lbs. of food,
according to the manual, although I've never attempted anything that
big.

See:
http://www.deni.com/multi_9200.asp.

My only complaint is that as a slow cooker and fryer, it's sometimes
too large for the job. Darn, have to make a double portion and freeze
half :-) Otherwise, I've been very pleased with it. And their customer
service is excellent. Soon after I got the thing, the handle on the
deep fryer came apart. I emailed them and got a new handle out almost
immediately.

Terry Pulliam Burd

--
"Most vigitaryans I iver see looked enough like their food to be
classed as cannybals."

Finley Peter Dunne (1900)

To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"

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Old 06-01-2007, 05:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer

Mark Thorson wrote on 05 Jan 2007 in rec.food.cooking

Sheldon wrote:

No more or less risk.


Oh? The purpose-built deep-fryer will have a thermostat
to prevent overheating, cracking the oil, and subsequent
major fire. It will also have a stable footing, compared
to a pot sitting on a stovetop. A big one will have a
spigot for draining the oil safely, rather than tipping
the pot over to pour its contents into another container.


Ask a fireman if in doubt...the purpose built deep fryer is hard to
clean... so the grease builds up effecting it's operation and causing
fires due to thermostat failure or short circuits etc. Plus the purpose
built deep fryer is left unattended more often, and a working unattended
kitchen appliances is just another way to spell fire.

If you're using just a pot on the stove, I suspect you'd at least
consider supervising it's use stricter, I do.

I've been making the occassional french fries on my stove for over 30
years with just a deep pot, peanut oil, a thermometer and a spyder. In
fact my french fry pot has out lived my last stove. Never even a hint at
a fire. Sure there are safety rules to follow like not over filling the
pot with oil and paying attention to the whole procedure, but most folks
would understand that.

The stove has better btu's than any, but the large commercial deep fry
units; so it will reach and stay at temp better than say a fry daddy.

Deep fry units are bulkly to store. And IMHO a general PIA.
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Old 06-01-2007, 08:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer


Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
Mark Thorson wrote on 05 Jan 2007 in rec.food.cooking

Sheldon wrote:

No more or less risk.


Oh? The purpose-built deep-fryer will have a thermostat
to prevent overheating, cracking the oil, and subsequent
major fire. It will also have a stable footing, compared
to a pot sitting on a stovetop. A big one will have a
spigot for draining the oil safely, rather than tipping
the pot over to pour its contents into another container.


Ask a fireman if in doubt...the purpose built deep fryer is hard to
clean... so the grease builds up effecting it's operation and causing
fires due to thermostat failure or short circuits etc. Plus the purpose
built deep fryer is left unattended more often, and a working unattended
kitchen appliances is just another way to spell fire.

If you're using just a pot on the stove, I suspect you'd at least
consider supervising it's use stricter, I do.

I've been making the occassional french fries on my stove for over 30
years with just a deep pot, peanut oil, a thermometer and a spyder. In
fact my french fry pot has out lived my last stove. Never even a hint at
a fire. Sure there are safety rules to follow like not over filling the
pot with oil and paying attention to the whole procedure, but most folks
would understand that.

The stove has better btu's than any, but the large commercial deep fry
units; so it will reach and stay at temp better than say a fry daddy.

Deep fry units are bulkly to store. And IMHO a general PIA.


No thermostatically controlled deep fat fryer should be trusted, always
use a thermometer with ANY deep fat fryer.

Regardless which method used all the deep fat frying rules must be
adhered to, including never leave unattended, never any children
permitted in the kitchen. All counter top deep fat fryers are
inherently dangerous in so much that they are used on counter tops, and
that they have a line cord... a stove top pot is far safer... Lodge
sells heavy cast iron set ups.

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Old 06-01-2007, 08:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer

Sheldon wrote:

No thermostatically controlled deep fat fryer should be trusted,
always use a thermometer with ANY deep fat fryer.


That's an important point. Even with my big, dual basket, propane-fired
Frymaster, I use a thermocouple-type thermometer to check the oil temp
against the thermostat's settings once a week.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com



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Old 07-01-2007, 06:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Looking for a big Deep Fryer

I'm curious, would you consider buying 2 smaller deep fryers?
We LOVE ours:
http://tinyurl.com/y5am68

But, yes, fries have to be made in several batches.

But if you had 2 of them going, you could do the first fry in one, and
the second fry in the other at a higher temp, and cruise right along.

This is a really quality fryer, best kitchen gift we ever got.
The element is immersed, so when you dump the food in, the oil comes
back up to temp very quickly, so you don't get grease-soaked food.

And it's really easy to clean.

We don't fry often, but when we do we go hog wild: onion rings to
munch on while we make fries, shrimp, chicken (KFC clone),
beer-battered fish.


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