Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 05-10-2009, 01:49 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Watch out for your burgers

Article on E Coli inspection pitfalls. . .

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/he...gewanted=print

My take: Best to buy fresh meat, grind it yourself.
Pierre

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Old 05-10-2009, 01:54 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Pierre wrote:
Article on E Coli inspection pitfalls. . .

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/he...gewanted=print

My take: Best to buy fresh meat, grind it yourself.


Yup. Cooking to temp works well also.
--
Dave
What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan


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Old 05-10-2009, 12:25 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Watch out for your burgers

Dave Bugg wrote:
Pierre wrote:
Article on E Coli inspection pitfalls. . .

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/he...gewanted=print

My take: Best to buy fresh meat, grind it yourself.


Yup. Cooking to temp works well also.


Nod. Proper food handling and cooking would prevent this. :/
Although I do prefer my burgers on the pink side of done.

--
DougW
Pull its horns, wipe its ass, and sit it on a platter!


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Old 05-10-2009, 04:14 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Watch out for your burgers


"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
...
Pierre wrote:
Article on E Coli inspection pitfalls. . .

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/he...gewanted=print

My take: Best to buy fresh meat, grind it yourself.


Yup. Cooking to temp works well also.


that's the problem with burgers. cooking to temp means cooking far more
than you might prefer to cook. You can cook a steak less, and not have the
problem.


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Old 05-10-2009, 05:33 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Watch out for your burgers

DougW wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:
Pierre wrote:
Article on E Coli inspection pitfalls. . .

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/he...gewanted=print

My take: Best to buy fresh meat, grind it yourself.


Yup. Cooking to temp works well also.


Nod. Proper food handling and cooking would prevent this. :/
Although I do prefer my burgers on the pink side of done.


Oh yes indeed!

--
Dave
What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan




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Old 05-10-2009, 05:35 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Watch out for your burgers

Wallace wrote:
"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
...
Pierre wrote:
Article on E Coli inspection pitfalls. . .

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/he...gewanted=print

My take: Best to buy fresh meat, grind it yourself.


Yup. Cooking to temp works well also.


that's the problem with burgers. cooking to temp means cooking far
more than you might prefer to cook. You can cook a steak less, and
not have the problem.


Too true. That's the beauty of grinding your own burger from your own fresh
hunks o' meat :-)

--
Dave
What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan


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Old 05-10-2009, 06:37 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Watch out for your burgers


"Dave Bugg" wrote in message

Too true. That's the beauty of grinding your own burger from your
own fresh
hunks o' meat :-)


This has me thinking and remembering. Long ago, we lived near a
friend who had an unusual way of making hamburger. Perhaps I'll
give it a try.

The guy and his family loved steaks and other cuts of beef. As
with most families, there would be leftovers from cookouts,
including large chunks of steak. When he'd have a rib roast, say
for Thanksgiving or Christmas, there would be some cooked
leftovers as well. When he'd make a stew, he'd have leftovers
including uncooked trimmings and stewed meat.

The guy kept a bag in his chest-type freezer and any decent
looking piece of COOKED or raw beef would be tossed in.
Eventually, he'd haul the bag out, thaw the meat enough to
separate the pieces, then run it all through is meat grinder. The
resulting hamburger would have a mix of (as I recall) about 50-50
cooked and uncooked beef in it: all from leftovers and trimmings
of large cuts of beef.

The meat was fantastic in chili and even burgers. The previously
cooked and seasoned leftovers from steak or roasts added
tremendously to the flavor of the food and to me, it seemed a wise
way to use leftovers. This was before the concerns of
contaminated hamburger. Maybe I'll start a bucket in the freezer
with leftover meat in it.

--
Nonny

To compel a man to subsidize with
taxes the propagation of policies
he abhors, is sinful and tyrannical.



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Old 05-10-2009, 06:54 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Watch out for your burgers

Nonny wrote:

This has me thinking and remembering. Long ago, we lived near a friend
who had an unusual way of making hamburger. Perhaps I'll give it a try.

The guy and his family loved steaks and other cuts of beef. As with
most families, there would be leftovers from cookouts, including large
chunks of steak. When he'd have a rib roast, say for Thanksgiving or
Christmas, there would be some cooked leftovers as well. When he'd make
a stew, he'd have leftovers including uncooked trimmings and stewed meat.

The guy kept a bag in his chest-type freezer and any decent looking
piece of COOKED or raw beef would be tossed in. Eventually, he'd haul
the bag out, thaw the meat enough to separate the pieces, then run it
all through is meat grinder. The resulting hamburger would have a mix
of (as I recall) about 50-50 cooked and uncooked beef in it: all from
leftovers and trimmings of large cuts of beef.

The meat was fantastic in chili and even burgers. The previously cooked
and seasoned leftovers from steak or roasts added tremendously to the
flavor of the food and to me, it seemed a wise way to use leftovers.
This was before the concerns of contaminated hamburger. Maybe I'll
start a bucket in the freezer with leftover meat in it.


I can't quite get up the nerve to do this for ground beef, but
I do it for stock. For both cooked and raw scraps that are of
respectable origin.

Freezer burn and other deterioration can be an issue. It effects the
texture mostly, which isn't a problem for stock.

--
Reg


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