Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 18-09-2009, 08:14 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading here and a
couple of other places i am interested in a general discussion on this
topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what products? site
reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,

Lee



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Old 18-09-2009, 09:43 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading
here and a couple of other places i am interested in a general
discussion on this topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what
products? site reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,


Cold smoking is quite easy with a Bradley, and is used in some
interesting ways. For instance, when some folk were out front of
the subdivision a few years back putting up Christmas decorations,
before joining them I placed a pound of almonds and a pound of
cashews on trays and smoked them for an hour. By the time the
people were ready to get to work, I had warm, smoked nuts to treat
everybody. Smoking cheese is a matter of taste, of course, but it
makes an interesting mini wheel to let people cut slices from to
put on crackers at a party.

Where I use cold smoking most is to impart a smoke flavor to food
that is ultimately cooked on the grill or microwave. For
instance, bulk bacon can be purchased, sprayed lightly with a 25%
solution of maple syrup and then smoked for 20 minutes or so using
an Apple puck. Then, it can be repackaged, microwaved, fried or
even frozen for future use.

I know one fellow who smoked a half salmon, then just left it in
the refrigerator thinking it'd be preserved. Thank goodness he
tossed it out when he spotted the green. As Nonny mentioned, it's
a great way to add smoke flavor, tough, to chicken, while still
preparing it the traditional way on the grill or even in a fryer.

Kent

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Old 18-09-2009, 11:42 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking


"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading here and a
couple of other places i am interested in a general discussion on this
topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what products? site
reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,

Lee


Cold smoking is done with curing. You need a cure in the meat first. This
is how bacon, ham, some sausages are done. They are generally cured, them
smoked for a long time at about 100 degrees, then brought up to a
temperature to make them safe.

It is also good for smoking cheese since it would melt in a regular smoker.

Smoke curing, or cold smoking, is not a part of what we do for barbecue,
which is smoke cooking. Without a cure, the meat would go bad during the
process.


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Old 20-09-2009, 12:15 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Kent Billeau" wrote in message
...

"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading here and a
couple of other places i am interested in a general discussion on this
topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what products? site
reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,


Cold smoking is quite easy with a Bradley, and is used in some interesting
ways. For instance, when some folk were out front of the subdivision a
few years back putting up Christmas decorations, before joining them I
placed a pound of almonds and a pound of cashews on trays and smoked them
for an hour. By the time the people were ready to get to work, I had
warm, smoked nuts to treat everybody. Smoking cheese is a matter of
taste, of course, but it makes an interesting mini wheel to let people cut
slices from to put on crackers at a party.

Where I use cold smoking most is to impart a smoke flavor to food that is
ultimately cooked on the grill or microwave. For instance, bulk bacon can
be purchased, sprayed lightly with a 25% solution of maple syrup and then
smoked for 20 minutes or so using an Apple puck. Then, it can be
repackaged, microwaved, fried or even frozen for future use.

I know one fellow who smoked a half salmon, then just left it in the
refrigerator thinking it'd be preserved. Thank goodness he tossed it out
when he spotted the green. As Nonny mentioned, it's a great way to add
smoke flavor, tough, to chicken, while still preparing it the traditional
way on the grill or even in a fryer.

Kent

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold smoked
salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature smoke, to avoid
cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on that. The next time I get some
good fresh wild salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the surface with
a bit of diluted "liquid smoke".

Horrors,

Ed



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Old 20-09-2009, 04:48 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking


"Theron" wrote in message
...

..

Kent

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold
smoked salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature
smoke, to avoid cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on
that. The next time I get some good fresh wild salmon I'm going
to make gravlax and cover the surface with a bit of diluted
"liquid smoke".

Horrors,

Ed


Dunno about Kent's but we live in LV and the typical summer air
temp alone can be well over 100f. When I cold smoke, I use meat
or food right from the refrigerator. Most smoking, for what I do,
can be accomplished in an hour or so. . . more can be
counterproductive. I tend to cold smoke the small or thin things,
like bacon, salmon, nuts, jerky etc., and am happy with the
results. So far, I've not killed myself with bad food, since the
temp rise from about 38f to "whatever" in an hour or so doesn't
seem to be enough to let bacteria grow. If someone lives in a
freezing, wild and desolate place like KC, Fairbanks or Billings,
that might work even more in their favor. grin


--
Nonny

Government is the great fiction
through which everybody endeavors
to live at the expense of everybody else.






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Old 20-09-2009, 05:11 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking

Theron wrote:

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold smoked
salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature smoke, to avoid
cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on that. The next time I get some
good fresh wild salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the surface with
a bit of diluted "liquid smoke".

Horrors,

Ed


I agree 100% that cold smoking should be "smoke without heat". For
some types of food a slightly elevated temp doesn't matter but for
others it ruins it. Cheese, for instance.

With Bradley equipment this is acheived by using the smoke generator
only. Hook it to a 3" pipe and send the smoke into a seperate
box that holds the food. Box temp will be no higher than ambient temp.

If you use the full Bradley smoker the temperature tends to rise
because it's insulated.

--
Reg
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Old 20-09-2009, 12:54 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking

all of that sounds wonderful, am really leaning towards this unit, i would
consider that stove top thing but i just can't beleive it wouldn't smoke my
house, Lee
"Kent Billeau" wrote in message
...

"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading here and a
couple of other places i am interested in a general discussion on this
topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what products? site
reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,


Cold smoking is quite easy with a Bradley, and is used in some interesting
ways. For instance, when some folk were out front of the subdivision a
few years back putting up Christmas decorations, before joining them I
placed a pound of almonds and a pound of cashews on trays and smoked them
for an hour. By the time the people were ready to get to work, I had
warm, smoked nuts to treat everybody. Smoking cheese is a matter of
taste, of course, but it makes an interesting mini wheel to let people cut
slices from to put on crackers at a party.

Where I use cold smoking most is to impart a smoke flavor to food that is
ultimately cooked on the grill or microwave. For instance, bulk bacon can
be purchased, sprayed lightly with a 25% solution of maple syrup and then
smoked for 20 minutes or so using an Apple puck. Then, it can be
repackaged, microwaved, fried or even frozen for future use.

I know one fellow who smoked a half salmon, then just left it in the
refrigerator thinking it'd be preserved. Thank goodness he tossed it out
when he spotted the green. As Nonny mentioned, it's a great way to add
smoke flavor, tough, to chicken, while still preparing it the traditional
way on the grill or even in a fryer.

Kent



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Old 20-09-2009, 12:59 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking

i realize its not the same as BBQ but love smoked cheese and salmon and if i
can get a unit that will do both for one money i will be well pleased... it
seems like this bradley will do both very nicely, thanks, Lee
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...

"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading here and a
couple of other places i am interested in a general discussion on this
topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what products? site
reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,

Lee


Cold smoking is done with curing. You need a cure in the meat first.
This is how bacon, ham, some sausages are done. They are generally cured,
them smoked for a long time at about 100 degrees, then brought up to a
temperature to make them safe.

It is also good for smoking cheese since it would melt in a regular
smoker.

Smoke curing, or cold smoking, is not a part of what we do for barbecue,
which is smoke cooking. Without a cure, the meat would go bad during the
process.



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Old 20-09-2009, 01:00 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking

salmon is one of the things i am interested in cold smoking, Lee
"Theron" wrote in message
...

"Kent Billeau" wrote in message
...

"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading here and
a couple of other places i am interested in a general discussion on this
topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what products? site
reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,


Cold smoking is quite easy with a Bradley, and is used in some
interesting ways. For instance, when some folk were out front of the
subdivision a few years back putting up Christmas decorations, before
joining them I placed a pound of almonds and a pound of cashews on trays
and smoked them for an hour. By the time the people were ready to get to
work, I had warm, smoked nuts to treat everybody. Smoking cheese is a
matter of taste, of course, but it makes an interesting mini wheel to let
people cut slices from to put on crackers at a party.

Where I use cold smoking most is to impart a smoke flavor to food that is
ultimately cooked on the grill or microwave. For instance, bulk bacon
can be purchased, sprayed lightly with a 25% solution of maple syrup and
then smoked for 20 minutes or so using an Apple puck. Then, it can be
repackaged, microwaved, fried or even frozen for future use.

I know one fellow who smoked a half salmon, then just left it in the
refrigerator thinking it'd be preserved. Thank goodness he tossed it out
when he spotted the green. As Nonny mentioned, it's a great way to add
smoke flavor, tough, to chicken, while still preparing it the traditional
way on the grill or even in a fryer.

Kent

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold smoked
salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature smoke, to avoid
cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on that. The next time I get
some good fresh wild salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the
surface with a bit of diluted "liquid smoke".

Horrors,

Ed





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Old 20-09-2009, 01:01 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking

how does your salmon turn out? this is one thing i am very interested in
doing, Lee
"Nonny" wrote in message
...

"Theron" wrote in message
...

.

Kent

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold smoked
salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature smoke, to avoid
cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on that. The next time I get
some good fresh wild salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the
surface with a bit of diluted "liquid smoke".

Horrors,

Ed


Dunno about Kent's but we live in LV and the typical summer air temp alone
can be well over 100f. When I cold smoke, I use meat or food right from
the refrigerator. Most smoking, for what I do, can be accomplished in an
hour or so. . . more can be counterproductive. I tend to cold smoke the
small or thin things, like bacon, salmon, nuts, jerky etc., and am happy
with the results. So far, I've not killed myself with bad food, since the
temp rise from about 38f to "whatever" in an hour or so doesn't seem to be
enough to let bacteria grow. If someone lives in a freezing, wild and
desolate place like KC, Fairbanks or Billings, that might work even more
in their favor. grin


--
Nonny

Government is the great fiction
through which everybody endeavors
to live at the expense of everybody else.








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Old 20-09-2009, 04:56 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking



Kent

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold smoked
salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature smoke, to avoid
cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on that. The next time I get
some good fresh wild salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the
surface with a bit of diluted "liquid smoke".


put a tray of ice in the smoker to help keep the temp down for cold smoking.


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Old 20-09-2009, 07:03 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking


"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
salmon is one of the things i am interested in cold smoking, Lee
"Theron" wrote in message
...

"Kent Billeau" wrote in message
...

"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after reading here and
a couple of other places i am interested in a general discussion on
this topic... for/agains? do you do it and on what products? site
reccomendations? recipes? the whole deal,

Cold smoking is quite easy with a Bradley, and is used in some
interesting ways. For instance, when some folk were out front of the
subdivision a few years back putting up Christmas decorations, before
joining them I placed a pound of almonds and a pound of cashews on trays
and smoked them for an hour. By the time the people were ready to get
to work, I had warm, smoked nuts to treat everybody. Smoking cheese is
a matter of taste, of course, but it makes an interesting mini wheel to
let people cut slices from to put on crackers at a party.

Where I use cold smoking most is to impart a smoke flavor to food that
is ultimately cooked on the grill or microwave. For instance, bulk
bacon can be purchased, sprayed lightly with a 25% solution of maple
syrup and then smoked for 20 minutes or so using an Apple puck. Then,
it can be repackaged, microwaved, fried or even frozen for future use.

I know one fellow who smoked a half salmon, then just left it in the
refrigerator thinking it'd be preserved. Thank goodness he tossed it
out when he spotted the green. As Nonny mentioned, it's a great way to
add smoke flavor, tough, to chicken, while still preparing it the
traditional way on the grill or even in a fryer.

Kent

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold smoked
salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature smoke, to avoid
cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on that. The next time I get
some good fresh wild salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the
surface with a bit of diluted "liquid smoke".

Horrors,

Ed


To cold smoke salmon you should cure it first. Make the Scandanivian gravlax
http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/132/Gravlax
and then smoke following. I've tried this several times without success.
The salmon ended up stiff and "cooked". I met quite a savvy fellow
Scandinavian who said, shockingly, what I said above. You make the gravlax,
and then apply carefully diluted liquid smoke. I haven't tried that, though
I'm going to.

As others have said, you have to get "cold smoke" to the fish, and you
should to do the curing first. You have to have a smoker that will generate
smoke without heat.

Good Luck

Ed,

BTW I've been using Morton's Tenderquick[salt, sugar .5% sodium nitrite and
..5% sodium nitrate] when making gravlax and I like the slight additional
"cure" taste. That product is good for dry curing.





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Old 20-09-2009, 07:06 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking

On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 08:56:44 -0700, Wallace wrote:

Kent

Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for "cold smoked
salmon"? I think you basically need room temperature smoke, to avoid
cooking the salmon. I've kind of given up on that. The next time I get
some good fresh wild salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the
surface with a bit of diluted "liquid smoke".


put a tray of ice in the smoker to help keep the temp down for cold smoking.


Can you use dry ice?

No drip. Less filling.

-sw
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Old 20-09-2009, 07:11 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking


"Theron" wrote in message
...

"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
salmon is one of the things i am interested in cold smoking,
Lee
"Theron" wrote in message
...

"Kent Billeau" wrote in message
...

"Stormmee" wrote in message
...
this is an area i know virtually nothing about. after
reading here and a couple of other places i am interested in
a general discussion on this topic... for/agains? do you do
it and on what products? site reccomendations? recipes? the
whole deal,

Cold smoking is quite easy with a Bradley, and is used in
some interesting ways. For instance, when some folk were out
front of the subdivision a few years back putting up
Christmas decorations, before joining them I placed a pound
of almonds and a pound of cashews on trays and smoked them
for an hour. By the time the people were ready to get to
work, I had warm, smoked nuts to treat everybody. Smoking
cheese is a matter of taste, of course, but it makes an
interesting mini wheel to let people cut slices from to put
on crackers at a party.

Where I use cold smoking most is to impart a smoke flavor to
food that is ultimately cooked on the grill or microwave.
For instance, bulk bacon can be purchased, sprayed lightly
with a 25% solution of maple syrup and then smoked for 20
minutes or so using an Apple puck. Then, it can be
repackaged, microwaved, fried or even frozen for future use.

I know one fellow who smoked a half salmon, then just left it
in the refrigerator thinking it'd be preserved. Thank
goodness he tossed it out when he spotted the green. As
Nonny mentioned, it's a great way to add smoke flavor, tough,
to chicken, while still preparing it the traditional way on
the grill or even in a fryer.

Kent
Will the Bradley smoke at as low a temp. that you need for
"cold smoked salmon"? I think you basically need room
temperature smoke, to avoid cooking the salmon. I've kind of
given up on that. The next time I get some good fresh wild
salmon I'm going to make gravlax and cover the surface with a
bit of diluted "liquid smoke".

Horrors,

Ed


To cold smoke salmon you should cure it first. Make the
Scandanivian gravlax
http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/132/Gravlax
and then smoke following. I've tried this several times without
success. The salmon ended up stiff and "cooked". I met quite a
savvy fellow Scandinavian who said, shockingly, what I said
above. You make the gravlax, and then apply carefully diluted
liquid smoke. I haven't tried that, though I'm going to.

As others have said, you have to get "cold smoke" to the fish,
and you should to do the curing first. You have to have a smoker
that will generate smoke without heat.

Good Luck


I think we're talking about two different things. In my case, we
purchase a large salmon fillet. From the refrigerator, it's
washed in cold water then laid on a Bradley grate. It's placed in
the Bradley and one or two Alder pucks are used, for a total time
in the smoker of about 20-40 minutes. The fillet is then brought
inside, removed from the rack and coated well with EVOO, followed
by a good dose of dried dill weed and Kosher salt. It's then
taken to the preheated as hot as it can get grill and cooked for
about 5 minutes meat side down, then flipped to the skin side and
cooked until it's the way we like it.

Here in the Nonny house, there's a disagreement between "leave the
fat on," and "scrape the fat off," group. The fillet is first
brought to the cutting board where it's cut into serving-length
pieces and the skin is removed. In the case of "leave the fat
on," it's served with the fat side down and the grill marks/dill
on top. In the case of the "scrape the fat off" group, I use a
fork to gently scrape the fat from the inverted serving, including
the lateral line. Then, like the other, its flipped and served
with the grill marks/dill on top.

In all cases, it's served with ginger butter on the side, and
that's a very popular addition. With the time the salmon fillet
spends in the smoker, I have no concern about it spoiling.

--
Nonny

Government is the great fiction
through which everybody endeavors
to live at the expense of everybody else.




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Old 20-09-2009, 07:30 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default cold smoking

On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 13:06:30 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 08:56:44 -0700, Wallace wrote:

put a tray of ice in the smoker to help keep the temp down for cold smoking.


Can you use dry ice?

No drip. Less filling.



Will creosote form if your "steam" is CO2?

-sw


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