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Old 06-10-2011, 11:02 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On Oct 6, 4:39*pm, James Silverton
wrote:
On 10/6/2011 3:27 PM, DaleW wrote:

" any champagne, except perhaps Natural (drier than sec), might work."
* You mean Brut Nature is drier than Brut I assume? Usually driest to sweetest is Brut Nature, Extra Brut, Brut, Sec (occasionally labeled extra dry like with White Srar), Demi-Sec, and Doux. Though I've not seen the latter in US markets. Occasionally see some demi-secs- actually carried my lone bottle of Pehu Simonet Gourmandise Demi Sec to a party last week (well, it said cake and Champagne), but never got to taste it.


I'm going to give Brut Champagne and edamame a try. Maybe a Kabinett (traditionally styled) as well- not sure why sugar and soy beans would be a problem.


You are right of course. Natural is drier than *Brut* and actually, I've
only seen it labelled "Natural". However, I'll probably stick to hard
liquor with Edamame; Scotch on the rocks is the way to go.


I have a bottle of Satoh Shochu from Japan (60% sweet potato, 40%
rice ) and it has 25% alcohol. It can be obtained in the US in the NYC
area and likely in a few other large cities. Perhaps this whiskey
would be a good match for edamame.


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Old 07-10-2011, 05:25 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

DaleW wrote:
oh, Mark, now don't be a tool


Well played, sir.

Mark Lipton
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Old 07-10-2011, 08:10 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On Oct 6, 8:28*am, Mark Lipton wrote:
On 10/6/11 2:03 AM, Mike Tommasi wrote:

Verdicchio di Matelica?


This is a less famous Italian Verdicchio from an official Italian
region that is selling for about US$12 to 16 in the US now.

Metallica is making wine now? *I hope it's more to my liking than the
stuff made by Maynard James Keenan ;-)


If you mean the heavy metal rock group Metallica, I do not know of
wine sold under their name. However there are some old rock groups
that have wine and even an absinthe sold under their name. There is a
note in the Oct. 2011, Decanter that says that AC/DC and Warburn
Estate now produce some AC/DC wines named for some of their hits such
as "Highway to Hell" Cabernet, "You Shook Me All Night Long" Moscato,
and "Hell's Bells" Sauvignon Blanc.

The same issue of Decanter has a cartoon of a couple in a restaurant
with a bottle of AC/DC wine on their table. The man says: "If it's
anything like their music we'll wake up tomorrow with a thumping
headache".
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Old 07-10-2011, 01:57 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

"NilsGLindgren" wrote in message
...
Hello
What to drink with edamame? You know, green soy beans, with a little
salt, slightly warm. We tried a 1998 Chablis which had an ever so
slight sniff of oxidisation - it went very well with the rest of the
meal which was heavily into the Japanese - but not the edamame. Xina
does not like sake (the kinds we get in Sweden are not particularly
interesting). Any ideas?


We had a Clare Valley riesling at the local Japanese - went well with
edamame and particularly well with tempura vegetables.

Cheers!

Martin

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Old 07-10-2011, 02:00 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame


"cwdjrxyz" skrev i melding
...
On Oct 6, 8:28 am, Mark Lipton wrote:
On 10/6/11 2:03 AM, Mike Tommasi wrote:

Verdicchio di Matelica?


This is a less famous Italian Verdicchio from an official Italian
region that is selling for about US$12 to 16 in the US now.


Funny thing is, I bought a bottle of this very wine today to have with
sushi. Will report

Anders




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Old 07-10-2011, 02:18 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

Besides AC/DC and MJK of Tool, there are more mellow musicians who own vineyards. Dave matthews owns a VA winery, and Boz Scaggs (who put out some good music, if maybe some of his biggest hits are a bit wimpy)has a CA winery. Would be a funny tasting to see if one can discern the musician's style in the wine.
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Old 07-10-2011, 02:34 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

Equipo Navazos "La Bota de Manzanilla" 22 with its salty profile would be
just perfect. I would rather have it with Jamón Ibérico, though.

s.

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Old 07-10-2011, 04:17 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On 10/7/11 9:57 AM, Mike Tommasi wrote:
On 07/10/2011 15:34, santiago wrote:
Equipo Navazos "La Bota de Manzanilla" 22 with its salty profile would be
just perfect. I would rather have it with Jamón Ibérico, though.


The whole Navazos series is wonderful!


From what I've had, I agree. The one problem is getting ahold of their
wines here in US as they sell out very quickly.

Mark Lipton


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Old 07-10-2011, 04:46 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On Oct 6, 4:02*pm, cwdjrxyz wrote:
On Oct 6, 4:39*pm, James Silverton
wrote:

On 10/6/2011 3:27 PM, DaleW wrote:


" any champagne, except perhaps Natural (drier than sec), might work."
* You mean Brut Nature is drier than Brut I assume? Usually driest to sweetest is Brut Nature, Extra Brut, Brut, Sec (occasionally labeled extra dry like with White Srar), Demi-Sec, and Doux. Though I've not seen the latter in US markets. Occasionally see some demi-secs- actually carried my lone bottle of Pehu Simonet Gourmandise Demi Sec to a party last week (well, it said cake and Champagne), but never got to taste it.


I'm going to give Brut Champagne and edamame a try. Maybe a Kabinett (traditionally styled) as well- not sure why sugar and soy beans would be a problem.


You are right of course. Natural is drier than *Brut* and actually, I've
only seen it labelled "Natural". However, I'll probably stick to hard
liquor with Edamame; Scotch on the rocks is the way to go.


I have a bottle of Satoh Shochu from Japan (60% sweet potato, 40%
rice ) and it has 25% alcohol. It can be obtained in the US in the NYC
area and likely in a few other large cities. Perhaps this whiskey
would be a good match for edamame.


This stuff always reminds me of paint thinner. Weirdly, it is all that
is sold in Japanese liquor stores as they don't sell Sake for some
reason.
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Old 07-10-2011, 10:14 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

Tried an Alsace Pinot Gris, Dirler Bux 2008, but while it is not bad,
it certainly is not the bee's knees.

BTW, do bees have knees? I mean they do ahve legs (6 of them, even),
but KNEES?


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Old 08-10-2011, 03:54 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On Oct 7, 4:14*pm, NilsGLindgren wrote:
Tried an Alsace Pinot Gris, Dirler Bux 2008, but while it is not bad,
it certainly is not the bee's knees.

BTW, do bees have knees? I mean they do ahve legs (6 of them, even),
but KNEES?


See http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/the-bees-knees.html for
information about the phrase "bees knees". I doubt if the name knee is
used for describing a bee's anatomy, but they do have pollen sacs on
their legs. I associate the phrase mostly with the US 1920s when the
Charleston dance might be associated with the phrase. I have not heard
anyone use the phrase in the last few decades.
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Old 08-10-2011, 10:56 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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"Anders Tørneskog" skrev i melding
...


Funny thing is, I bought a bottle of this very wine today to have with
sushi. Will report

Belisario Terre di Valbona, Verdicchio di Matelica 2010 - about 11USD
Flowery bouquet, pale yellow color, nice minerality and fruitiness, quite
dry, not high but sufficient acidity, good length.
A pleasant but not great wine with typical Verdicchio character. Shop had
another wine from same producer at a rather higher price so I'd guess this
one single bottle doesn't prove the merits of Verdicchio di Matelica. B+ on
the Dale scale
Anders


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Old 08-10-2011, 11:32 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On Oct 8, 4:54*am, cwdjrxyz wrote:
On Oct 7, 4:14*pm, NilsGLindgren wrote:

Tried an Alsace Pinot Gris, Dirler Bux 2008, but while it is not bad,
it certainly is not the bee's knees.


BTW, do bees have knees? I mean they do ahve legs (6 of them, even),
but KNEES?


Seehttp://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/the-bees-knees.htmlfor
information about the phrase "bees knees". I doubt if the name knee is
used for describing a bee's anatomy, but they do have pollen sacs on
their legs. I associate the phrase mostly with the US 1920s when the
Charleston dance might be associated with the phrase. I have not heard
anyone use the phrase in the last few decades.


OK so it was not the cat's pyamas, then. Tonight I tried a beer (Kirin
Ichiban) and an Amontillado - they were better (particularly the
Amontillado), still not perfect.
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Old 09-10-2011, 02:06 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On 10/8/2011 6:32 PM, NilsGLindgren wrote:
On Oct 8, 4:54 am, wrote:
On Oct 7, 4:14 pm, wrote:

Tried an Alsace Pinot Gris, Dirler Bux 2008, but while it is not bad,
it certainly is not the bee's knees.


BTW, do bees have knees? I mean they do ahve legs (6 of them, even),
but KNEES?


Seehttp://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/the-bees-knees.htmlfor
information about the phrase "bees knees". I doubt if the name knee is
used for describing a bee's anatomy, but they do have pollen sacs on
their legs. I associate the phrase mostly with the US 1920s when the
Charleston dance might be associated with the phrase. I have not heard
anyone use the phrase in the last few decades.


OK so it was not the cat's pyamas, then. Tonight I tried a beer (Kirin
Ichiban) and an Amontillado - they were better (particularly the
Amontillado), still not perfect.


As I said, I like Scotch on the Rocks with Edamame in pods. Removing the
beans with your teeth really beats having them already shelled. Frozen
Edamame in pods are readily available and a small bowlful can be
defrosted in 30-40 seconds in the microwave if you are eating them at home.
--


James Silverton, Potomac

I'm *not*
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:51 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default Edamame

On 9 Okt, 03:06, James Silverton
wrote:
On 10/8/2011 6:32 PM, NilsGLindgren wrote:









On Oct 8, 4:54 am, *wrote:
On Oct 7, 4:14 pm, *wrote:


Tried an Alsace Pinot Gris, Dirler Bux 2008, but while it is not bad,
it certainly is not the bee's knees.


BTW, do bees have knees? I mean they do ahve legs (6 of them, even),
but KNEES?


Seehttp://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/the-bees-knees.htmlfor
information about the phrase "bees knees". I doubt if the name knee is
used for describing a bee's anatomy, but they do have pollen sacs on
their legs. I associate the phrase mostly with the US 1920s when the
Charleston dance might be associated with the phrase. I have not heard
anyone use the phrase in the last few decades.


OK so it was not the cat's pyamas, then. Tonight I tried a beer (Kirin
Ichiban) and an Amontillado - they were better (particularly the
Amontillado), still not perfect.


As I said, I like Scotch on the Rocks with Edamame in pods. Removing the
beans with your teeth really beats having them already shelled. Frozen
Edamame in pods are readily available and a small bowlful can be
defrosted in 30-40 seconds in the microwave if you are eating them at home.
--

James Silverton, Potomac

I'm *not*


That's how I do them. But I don't drink hard liquor (very often).
About three times a year ...


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