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Old 26-09-2006, 02:56 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

Sunday I took Betsy's mom to airport, then returned home to follow
Betsy's instructions re cooking some duck legs (she was playing).
Recipe-following is not my forte, but I made it through a simple though
very good recipe that Betsy has done before (Madeliene Kamman-season
legs, slather with mustard, coat with breadcrumbs, drizzle with butter,
2 hours at 375F). I also did some green beans and potatoes with basil.
Betsy came home, we had a nice dinner with a bottle (my last bottle?)
of the 2000 Michel Lafarge Bourgogne. I'm a relentless experimenter,
and almost never buy wines by the case except for an occasional ageable
Bordeaux, but this was one of the exceptions. And I think this was my
last bottle. Adn that makes me sad. Pretty cherry and raspberry fruit,
with just a hint of bitterness to keep it interesting. Good acidity,
mineral and floral notes. With air the earthy notes take wing. A simple
Bourgogne, a non-herarlded vintage, take your shots, but this is a good
wine. A-/B+

Tonight Betsy rewarded me for a big afternoon of car-haggling by making
a meatloaf recipe I had sent her (Sunset magazine from years ago, a
lamb and feta meatloaf). Very good, served with brown rice,red chard,
and the 1995 Berard P & F "Cuvee Prestige" Chateauneuf-du-Pape. Tight
at first, then warm ripe red fruit and a little earth appear as it gets
some air. Ends up a pleasant round red wine, but doesn't show much
complexity or depth. Not flawed, tired, or over the hill, just a tad
dull. B-

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency.


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Old 26-09-2006, 04:21 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

DaleW wrote:
Sunday I took Betsy's mom to airport, then returned home to follow
Betsy's instructions re cooking some duck legs (she was playing).
Recipe-following is not my forte, but I made it through a simple though
very good recipe that Betsy has done before (Madeliene Kamman-season
legs, slather with mustard, coat with breadcrumbs, drizzle with butter,
2 hours at 375F).


That seems awfully hot for duck legs. Were they tender?


Tonight Betsy rewarded me for a big afternoon of car-haggling by making
a meatloaf recipe I had sent her (Sunset magazine from years ago, a
lamb and feta meatloaf). Very good, served with brown rice,red chard,
and the 1995 Berard P & F "Cuvee Prestige" Chateauneuf-du-Pape. Tight
at first, then warm ripe red fruit and a little earth appear as it gets
some air. Ends up a pleasant round red wine, but doesn't show much
complexity or depth. Not flawed, tired, or over the hill, just a tad
dull. B-


Wow, Dale. I consider myself pretty well versed in the wines of
Chateauneuf-du-Pape, but I must confess to complete ignorance regarding
this producer. Who imports it? The wines of '95 are big and backward.
I'm still waiting on mine while drinking my '94s, '89s and '90s.

Mark Lipton
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Old 26-09-2006, 08:16 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

In article ,
Mark Lipton wrote:

DaleW wrote:
Sunday I took Betsy's mom to airport, then returned home to follow
Betsy's instructions re cooking some duck legs (she was playing).
Recipe-following is not my forte, but I made it through a simple though
very good recipe that Betsy has done before (Madeliene Kamman-season
legs, slather with mustard, coat with breadcrumbs, drizzle with butter,
2 hours at 375F).


That seems awfully hot for duck legs. Were they tender?


Tonight Betsy rewarded me for a big afternoon of car-haggling by making
a meatloaf recipe I had sent her (Sunset magazine from years ago, a
lamb and feta meatloaf). Very good, served with brown rice,red chard,
and the 1995 Berard P & F "Cuvee Prestige" Chateauneuf-du-Pape. Tight
at first, then warm ripe red fruit and a little earth appear as it gets
some air. Ends up a pleasant round red wine, but doesn't show much
complexity or depth. Not flawed, tired, or over the hill, just a tad
dull. B-


Wow, Dale. I consider myself pretty well versed in the wines of
Chateauneuf-du-Pape, but I must confess to complete ignorance regarding
this producer. Who imports it? The wines of '95 are big and backward.
I'm still waiting on mine while drinking my '94s, '89s and '90s.

Mark Lipton


I can concur with the temp for cooking as I have made the same recipe
many times now with great results every time. I also have never heard of
this producer.
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Old 26-09-2006, 09:45 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

As Larry L says, this recipe is pretty good. Duck isn't fall-apart
confitish, but not tough at all. Our only modifications are we use
panko, cover pan, and take legs out of pans and put on cookie sheet for
5 minutes broiling at end. Great recipe when you want duck in 2 hrs,
and when you can't spend lots of time.

I've had a couple of Berard Pere & Fils before. I'll look at importer
when I get home (I think a German name on West Coast!).

While I'm not a Gilman declaring half of the '95s as dying, I've had
more than one disappointing one (and not just closed). All I have left
is Beaucastel, and not looking for more.

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Old 26-09-2006, 10:28 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

On 26 Sep 2006 13:45:12 -0700
"DaleW" wrote:

While I'm not a Gilman declaring half of the '95s as dying, I've had
more than one disappointing one (and not just closed). All I have left
is Beaucastel, and not looking for more.


'95 in CdP is certainly a paradoxical year. Mine never really seemed to close
down, where others report complete hibernation.

Within the last month we had a bunch of 95s, from Beaurenard, Font de Michelle,
Roger Perrin. Took no notes (entertaining) but all seem in excellent shape
from what I can tell.

Go figure...

-E
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Emery Davis
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Old 27-09-2006, 12:44 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

Mark, importer is W.Wg. Best Weinkellerei in San Diego.

Emery, I have found some reputable '95s too ripe for my tastes, and
often one-dimensional. No real big boys- things like Chapoutier Le
Bernardine. I'm not totally down on the vintage. But John Gilman had an
interesting article in a "View From the Cellar" about Southern Rhones,
where he kind of pegged '95 as the year he felt things went the wrong
way ("Parkerization", though he didn't use the term) in the Southern
Rhone . Lots of makers going for riper picking and concentrating a bit
much on the luxury cuvees. I'm a bit more tolerant than John of
modernistic tendencies, but I do take seriously his doubts re many post
1990-CdPs having the longevity of earlier wines from the appellation.
There's nobody who I know who writes with more knowledge than Gilman
(disclaimer, I have dinner/wines with John once a month or so).

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Old 27-09-2006, 01:19 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

PS I know you enjoy Loire reds, too. The 2005 Filliatreau La Grand
Vignolle was great tonight, and a fine value at $14!

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Old 27-09-2006, 10:12 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default TN: '00 Bourgogne, '95 CdP

On 26 Sep 2006 16:44:55 -0700
"DaleW" wrote:

[]
Emery, I have found some reputable '95s too ripe for my tastes, and
often one-dimensional. No real big boys- things like Chapoutier Le
Bernardine. I'm not totally down on the vintage. But John Gilman had an
interesting article in a "View From the Cellar" about Southern Rhones,
where he kind of pegged '95 as the year he felt things went the wrong
way ("Parkerization", though he didn't use the term) in the Southern
Rhone . Lots of makers going for riper picking and concentrating a bit
much on the luxury cuvees. I'm a bit more tolerant than John of
modernistic tendencies, but I do take seriously his doubts re many post
1990-CdPs having the longevity of earlier wines from the appellation.
There's nobody who I know who writes with more knowledge than Gilman
(disclaimer, I have dinner/wines with John once a month or so).


Parkerization has been a powerful temptation indeed in CdP. One has
only to look at the prices now commanded by the Parker favorites to
understand the lure. There have been several reactions to this: some
that have nothing to lose I think have gone down that path; some
have released a cuvée, like Beaurenard, which is specifically tailored
to the Parker model; others like Roger Perrin won't change their style
for anyone.

CdP had the advantage of being a fairly expensive -- if not by current
standards -- wine on average, perhaps 60 - 100 FF/bt. So it was
a sizable risk for the successful producers to switch everything
over to the Parker model, because they already had the success
of a client base (not US) and high profits by domestic French
standards. So, I certainly don't disagree with John generally but
do think that many have avoided the problem in CdP. Still as
I said the 95s never shut down much for me, so...

In the Southern Rhone in general, though, Parker was making a
huge amount of noise in the early 90s, and many of the good
villages vin de garde were still selling in the 20-30 FF range.
For these guys, looking at the US and even UK market, the
temptation for many was too strong not to gamble.

I feel strongly that by any measure he has had a very negative
impact on the larger industry in the southern Rhone. French
wines can't compete with the new world on a one to one basis --
costs are too high -- so without retaining typicity there aren't
many advantages.

-E
--
Emery Davis
You can reply to ecom
by removing the well known companies



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