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Old 04-08-2008, 01:53 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne

Hello,
After discussion with the esteemed Herr Professor Lipton, I managed to weed,
cut down, and prune my presentation of Bourgogne (or Burgundy, if you so
prefer) to 192 words, approximatively.
Here it follows:
Bourgogne as a wine making region is, mostly, a long escarpment of Jurassic
lime mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to northern
Beaujolais in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of Yonne,
centered on Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions due to
differences in soil and climate: From north to south Cote de Nuits and Cote
de Beaune (together forming Cote d'Or), Cote Chalonnaise, and Cote
Maconnaise.

Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noire, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligoté for whites.
Other varieties have local importance.

In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Controllé, with subclassifications due to geographical
provenance and differences in vinification.

Next step would be commune, or village. This level exists in all the
mentioned subregions. Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of
superior vineyards in the village appellations. This level does not exist in
Cote Maconnaise. Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of
grapes for the best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in
Cote d'Or and Chablis.



Your opinions are eagerly sought.



Cheers



Nils



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Old 04-08-2008, 02:11 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne

On Aug 4, 8:53�am, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
wrote:
Hello,
After discussion with the esteemed Herr Professor Lipton, I managed to weed,
cut down, and prune my presentation of Bourgogne (or Burgundy, if you so
prefer) to 192 words, approximatively.
Here it follows:
Bourgogne as a wine making region is, mostly, a long escarpment of Jurassic
lime mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to northern
Beaujolais in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of Yonne,
centered on Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions due to
differences in soil and climate: From north to south Cote de Nuits and Cote
de Beaune (together forming Cote d'Or), Cote Chalonnaise, and Cote
Maconnaise.

Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noire, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligot� for whites.
Other varieties have local importance.

In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Controll� with subclassifications due to geographical
provenance and differences in vinification.

Next step would be commune, or village. This level exists in all the
mentioned subregions. Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of
superior vineyards in the village appellations. This level does not exist in
Cote Maconnaise. Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of
grapes for the best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in
Cote d'Or and Chablis.

Your opinions are eagerly sought.

Cheers

Nils


Well, you seemed to reach all of the importatn points of a very
complex appelation and all in 192 words!
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Old 04-08-2008, 04:06 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, corrected for diacriticals

Bourgogne as a wine making region is a long escarpment of Jurassic lime
mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to northern Beaujolais
in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of Yonne, centered on
Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions due to differences
in soil and climate: From north to south Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune
(together forming Côte d'Or), Côte Chalonnaise, and Côte Maconnaise.

Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noire, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligoté for whites.
Other varieties have local importance, such as, Sauvignon Blanc in St Bris,
and Caesar in Irancy.

In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Controllée, with subclassifications due to
geographical provenance and differences in vinification.

Next step would be commune, or village. This level exists in all the
mentioned subregions. Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of
superior vineyards in the village appellations. This level does not exist in
Côte Mconnaise. Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of
grapes for the best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in
Côte d'Or and Chablis.


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Old 04-08-2008, 04:58 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, corrected for diacriticals

In article , Nils Gustaf Lindgren
writes
Bourgogne as a wine making region is a long escarpment of Jurassic lime
mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to northern Beaujolais
in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of Yonne, centered on
Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions due to differences
in soil and climate: From north to south Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune
(together forming Côte d'Or), Côte Chalonnaise, and Côte Maconnaise.

Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noire, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligoté for whites.
Other varieties have local importance, such as, Sauvignon Blanc in St Bris,
and Caesar in Irancy.

In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Controllée, with subclassifications due to
geographical provenance and differences in vinification.

Next step would be commune, or village. This level exists in all the
mentioned subregions. Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of
superior vineyards in the village appellations. This level does not exist in
Côte Mconnaise. Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of
grapes for the best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in
Côte d'Or and Chablis.


You still need to change Pinot Noire to Pinot Noir

Sheila
--
---
Sheila Page
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Old 04-08-2008, 05:46 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, diacriticals in place, slightly fleshed out ...

Bourgogne as a wine making region is a long escarpment of Jurassic lime
mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to northern Beaujolais
in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of Yonne, centered on
Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions due to differences
in soil and climate: From north to south Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune
(together forming Côte d'Or), Côte Chalonnaise, and Côte Mconnaise.



Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noire, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligoté for whites.
Other varieties have local importance, such as, Sauvignon Blanc in St Bris,
and Caesar in Irancy.



In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Controllée, with subclassifications due to
geographical provenance and differences in vinification. There are at least
23 different sub classes.

Next step is commune, or village, of which there are 44. This level exists
in all the mentioned subregions; 30 are in Côte d'Or.

Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of superior vineyards in
the village appellations. This level does not exist in Côte Mconnaise.
There are 562 1er crus: 39 in Chablis, 129 in Côte Chalonnaise, the rest in
Côte d'Or.

Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of grapes for the
best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in Côte d'Or (31)
and Chablis (1).




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Old 04-08-2008, 05:49 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, corrected for ALL diacriticals, slightly fleshed out ...

Bourgogne as a wine making region is a long escarpment of Jurassic lime
mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to northern Beaujolais
in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of Yonne, centered on
Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions due to differences
in soil and climate: From north to south Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune
(together forming Côte d'Or), Côte Chalonnaise, and Côte Mconnaise.



Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noir, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligoté for whites.
Other varieties have local importance, such as, Sauvignon Blanc in St Bris,
and Caesar in Irancy.



In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Controllée, with subclassifications due to
geographical provenance and differences in vinification. There are at least
23 different sub classes.

Next step is commune, or village, of which there are 44. This level exists
in all the mentioned subregions; 30 are in Côte d'Or.

Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of superior vineyards in
the village appellations. This level does not exist in Côte Mconnaise.
There are 562 1er crus: 39 in Chablis, 129 in Côte Chalonnaise, the rest in
Côte d'Or.

Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of grapes for the
best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in Côte d'Or (31)
and Chablis (1).


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Old 04-08-2008, 05:59 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, corrected for ALL diacriticals, slightly fleshedout ...

On Aug 4, 12:49�pm, "Nils Gustaf Lindgren"
wrote:
Bourgogne as a wine making region is a long escarpment of Jurassic lime
mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to northern Beaujolais
in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of Yonne, centered on
Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions due to differences
in soil and climate: From north to south C�te de Nuits and C�te de Beaune
(together forming C�te d'Or), C�te Chalonnaise, and C�te M�connaise.

Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noir, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligot� for whites.
Other varieties have local importance, such as, Sauvignon Blanc in St Bris,
and Caesar in Irancy.

In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Controll�e, with subclassifications due to
geographical provenance and differences in vinification. There are at least
23 different sub classes.

Next step is commune, or village, of which there are 44. This level exists
in all the mentioned subregions; 30 are in C�te d'Or.

Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of superior vineyards in
the village appellations. This level does not exist in C�te M�connaise.
There are 562 1er crus: 39 in Chablis, 129 in C�te Chalonnaise, the rest in
C�te d'Or.

Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of grapes for the
best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in C�te d'Or (31)
and Chablis (1).


Very nice, thanks Nils Gustaf. You might want to start off with
"Bourgogne (aka Burgundy)"
I know it seems self-evident, but these things are geared towards
newbies.
Thanks for your work!
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Old 05-08-2008, 05:39 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne

Mike Tommasi wrote:

Only once, but it has been misspelled throughout the whole
thread:

Some spelling corrections (or typos for the keyboard accent
impaired): Côte ..., Côte Mconnaise, Appellation Bourgogne
Controllée, Pinot Noir

^^^
|||

Contrôlée

M.
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Old 05-08-2008, 06:49 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne

[Only once, but it has been misspelled throughout the whole
thread]

Mike Tommasi wrote:

Some spelling corrections (or typos for the keyboard accent
impaired): Côte ..., Côte Mconnaise, Appellation Bourgogne
Controllée, Pinot Noir

^^^
|||

Contrôlée

M.
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Old 05-08-2008, 07:59 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, corrected for REALLY all diacriticals, and typos, slightly fleshed out ...

(Takes deep breath, finds inner centre of stillness, contemplates innermost
being and counts to ten ...):

Bourgogne (aka Burgundy) as a wine making region is a long escarpment of
Jurassic lime mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to
northern Beaujolais in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of
Yonne, centered on Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions
due to differences in soil and climate: From north to south Côte de Nuits
and Côte de Beaune (together forming Côte d'Or), Côte Chalonnaise, and Côte
Mconnaise.



Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noir, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligoté for whites.
Other varieties have local importance, such as, Sauvignon Blanc in St Bris,
and Caesar in Irancy.



In terms of quality, the ladder of appellations starts with the region,
Appellation Bourgogne Contrôlée, with subclassifications due to geographical
provenance and differences in vinification. There are at least 23 different
sub classes.

Next step is commune, or village, of which there are 44. This level exists
in all the mentioned subregions; 30 are in Côte d'Or.

Premier cru (first growth) is a subclassification of superior vineyards in
the village appellations. This level does not exist in Côte Mconnaise.
There are 562 1er crus: 39 in Chablis, 129 in Côte Chalonnaise, the rest in
Côte d'Or.

Grand cru (great growth) is the top level growth place of grapes for the
best wines, with prices to match. Grand cru exists only in Côte d'Or (31)
and Chablis (1).




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Old 11-08-2008, 10:03 PM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, corrected for REALLY all diacriticals, and typos,slightly fleshed out ...

Nils Gustaf Lindgren wrote:
(Takes deep breath, finds inner centre of stillness, contemplates innermost
being and counts to ten ...):


Thanks very much for putting this together. I just got back from
vacation, so here are my comments (FWTW):

Bourgogne (aka Burgundy) as a wine making region is a long escarpment of
Jurassic lime mixed with clay, stretching from Dijon in the north to
northern Beaujolais in the south. Separated from it are the vineyards of
Yonne, centered on Chablis. The escarpment is divided in separate subregions
due to differences in soil and climate: From north to south Côte de Nuits
and Côte de Beaune (together forming Côte d'Or), Côte Chalonnaise, and Côte
Mconnaise.


How about a paragraph of touristic information? How far from Paris?
How does one reach there if not equipped with an auto (or should one not
even contemplate such a trip?) Where should one stay (geographically)
for a visit (Dijon? Beaune? pros/cons?)



Varietals of primary importance are, for red wines Pinot Noir, for white
Chardonnay; secondary varietals are Gamay for reds, and Aligoté for whites.
Other varieties have local importance, such as, Sauvignon Blanc in St Bris,
and Caesar in Irancy.

^^^^^^
Cesar, non?

Very nice precis, Nils. Bravo!

Mark Lipton


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Old 12-08-2008, 02:21 AM posted to alt.food.wine
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Default FAQ Bourgogne, corrected for REALLY all diacriticals, and typos,slightly fleshed out ...

Mark Lipton wrote:

How about a paragraph of touristic information? How far from Paris?
How does one reach there if not equipped with an auto (or should one not
even contemplate such a trip?) Where should one stay (geographically)
for a visit (Dijon? Beaune? pros/cons?)


p.s. Nils, if you're feeling beleaguered and overworked, let me know
and I'll bang one out for you. When all is done, I'll post a "working
copy" of the Bourgogne section for further comments/corrections before
it goes "live" in the FAQ.

Your humble FAQ editor,
Mark Lipton

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