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Old 19-04-2006, 06:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default baking soda vs baking powder


"Mike "Piedmont"" wrote in message
...
:I have a cookie recipe that calls for baking soda, can I simply use the
: same amount of baking powder? I know, just go to store and buy a box of
: ArmNHammer. (grin)
: --
: Regards,
:
: Piedmont
:
: The Practical Bar-B-Q'r at: http://web.infoave.net/~amwil/Index.htm
:
snip

Google is your friend!

Frenchy



Both baking powder and baking soda are chemical leavening agents that cause
batters to rise when baked. The leavener enlarges the bubbles which are already
present in the batter produced through creaming of ingredients. When a recipe
contains baking powder and baking soda, the baking powder does most of the
leavening. The baking soda is added to neutralize the acids in the recipe plus to
add tenderness and some leavening. When using baking powder or baking soda in a
recipe, make sure to sift or whisk with the other dry ingredients before adding to
the batter to ensure uniformity. Otherwise the baked good can have large holes.
Baking powder consists of baking soda, one or more acid salts (cream of tartar and
sodium aluminum sulfate) plus cornstarch to absorb any moisture so a reaction does
not take place until a liquid is added to the batter. Most baking powder used
today is double-acting which means it reacts to liquid and heat and happens in two
stages. The first reaction takes place when you add the baking powder to the
batter and it is moistened. One of the acid salts reacts with the baking soda and
produces carbon dioxide gas. The second reaction takes place when the batter is
placed in the oven. The gas cells expand causing the batter to rise. Because of
the two stages, baking of the batter can be delayed for about 15-20 minutes
without it losing its leavening power.
Too much baking powder can cause the batter to be bitter tasting. It can also
cause the batter to rise rapidly and then collapse. (i.e. The air bubbles in the
batter grow too large and break causing the batter to fall.) Cakes will have a
coarse, fragile crumb with a fallen center. Too little baking powder results in a
tough cake that has poor volume and a compact crumb.
Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate or bicarbonate of soda (alkali) is
about four times as strong as baking powder. It is used in recipes that contain
an acidic ingredient (e.g. vinegar, citrus juice, sour cream, yogurt, buttermilk,
chocolate, cocoa (not Dutch-processed), honey, molasses (also brown sugar), fruits
and maple syrup). Baking soda starts to react and release carbon dioxide gas as
soon as it is added to the batter and moistened. Make sure to bake the batter
immediately.
Baking soda has an indefinite shelf life if stored in a sealed container in a cool
dry place. Too much baking soda will result in a soapy taste with a coarse, open
crumb. Baking soda causes reddening of cocoa powder when baked, hence the name
Devil's Food Cake.



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Old 19-04-2006, 07:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default baking soda vs baking powder

I have a cookie recipe that calls for baking soda, can I simply use the
same amount of baking powder? I know, just go to store and buy a box of
ArmNHammer. (grin)
--
Regards,

Piedmont

The Practical Bar-B-Q'r at: http://web.infoave.net/~amwil/Index.htm

What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless,
whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism
or the holy name of liberty or democracy?

Mahatma Gandhi, "Non-Violence in Peace and War"














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Old 19-04-2006, 11:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default baking soda vs baking powder


Frenchy wrote:
"Mike "Piedmont"" wrote in message
...
:I have a cookie recipe that calls for baking soda, can I simply use the
: same amount of baking powder? I know, just go to store and buy a box of
: ArmNHammer. (grin)
: --
: Regards,
:
: Piedmont
:
: The Practical Bar-B-Q'r at: http://web.infoave.net/~amwil/Index.htm
:
snip

Google is your friend!

Frenchy


I think what Frenchy meant to say was, "No".
Good information, I always wondered what the differences were, but
never took the time to check. Thanks, Frenchy.


Both baking powder and baking soda are chemical leavening agents that cause
batters to rise when baked. The leavener enlarges the bubbles which are already
present in the batter produced through creaming of ingredients. When a recipe
contains baking powder and baking soda, the baking powder does most of the
leavening. The baking soda is added to neutralize the acids in the recipe plus to
add tenderness and some leavening. When using baking powder or baking soda in a
recipe, make sure to sift or whisk with the other dry ingredients before adding to
the batter to ensure uniformity. Otherwise the baked good can have large holes.
Baking powder consists of baking soda, one or more acid salts (cream of tartar and
sodium aluminum sulfate) plus cornstarch to absorb any moisture so a reaction does
not take place until a liquid is added to the batter. Most baking powder used
today is double-acting which means it reacts to liquid and heat and happens in two
stages. The first reaction takes place when you add the baking powder to the
batter and it is moistened. One of the acid salts reacts with the baking soda and
produces carbon dioxide gas. The second reaction takes place when the batter is
placed in the oven. The gas cells expand causing the batter to rise. Because of
the two stages, baking of the batter can be delayed for about 15-20 minutes
without it losing its leavening power.
Too much baking powder can cause the batter to be bitter tasting. It can also
cause the batter to rise rapidly and then collapse. (i.e. The air bubbles in the
batter grow too large and break causing the batter to fall.) Cakes will have a
coarse, fragile crumb with a fallen center. Too little baking powder results in a
tough cake that has poor volume and a compact crumb.
Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate or bicarbonate of soda (alkali) is
about four times as strong as baking powder. It is used in recipes that contain
an acidic ingredient (e.g. vinegar, citrus juice, sour cream, yogurt, buttermilk,
chocolate, cocoa (not Dutch-processed), honey, molasses (also brown sugar), fruits
and maple syrup). Baking soda starts to react and release carbon dioxide gas as
soon as it is added to the batter and moistened. Make sure to bake the batter
immediately.
Baking soda has an indefinite shelf life if stored in a sealed container in a cool
dry place. Too much baking soda will result in a soapy taste with a coarse, open
crumb. Baking soda causes reddening of cocoa powder when baked, hence the name
Devil's Food Cake.


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Old 19-04-2006, 11:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default baking soda vs baking powder

salgud wrote:


I think what Frenchy meant to say was, "No".
Good information, I always wondered what the differences were, but
never took the time to check. Thanks, Frenchy.


And I think the OP already knew that.
Some recipes call for Baking Soda and some call for Baking Powder. The odd one calls for
both , but I have yet to come across a recipe that calls for Baking Powder OR Baking
Soda.

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Old 20-04-2006, 01:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default baking soda vs baking powder


"Mike "Piedmont"" wrote in message
...
I have a cookie recipe that calls for baking soda, can I simply use the same amount
of baking powder? I know, just go to store and buy a box of ArmNHammer. (grin)
--
Regards,

Piedmont


In a word, No.

kimberly




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Old 20-04-2006, 01:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default baking soda vs baking powder

On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 13:40:47 -0500, "Mike \"Piedmont\""
wrote:

I have a cookie recipe that calls for baking soda, can I simply use the
same amount of baking powder? I know, just go to store and buy a box of
ArmNHammer. (grin)


Read the label of your baking powder. The first ingredient should be
"Sodium of bicarbonate" ie baking soda. From what I understand
the other ingredients are acids meant to interact with the baking
soda.

Remember those vinegar and baking soda volcanoes you used to make as
a child? Baking soda and acids in foods, cause a similar reaction
which is why the baking soda causes foods to rise. The difference
between soda and powder is that powder contains it's own acids.

Plus I think the powder is ground finer, I think.


--------------------------------------------------
Thaddeus L. Olczyk, PhD
Think twice, code once.
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Old 20-04-2006, 01:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default baking soda vs baking powder

In article ,
"Mike \"Piedmont\"" wrote:

I have a cookie recipe that calls for baking soda, can I simply use the
same amount of baking powder? I know, just go to store and buy a box of
ArmNHammer. (grin)


Baking soda and baking powder are not the same. Both are leavening
agents but they act differently. Baking powder *contains* baking soda.

http://tinyurl.com/bvns9
http://tinyurl.com/ganzv
http://tinyurl.com/4d8cg
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 4-17-2006 with Easter stuffs.
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
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Old 21-04-2006, 03:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
AC AC is offline
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Default baking soda vs baking powder


Mike "Piedmont srote:

I have a cookie recipe that calls for baking soda, can I simply use the
same amount of baking powder? I know, just go to store and buy a box of
ArmNHammer. (grin)
--
Regards,

Piedmont

The Practical Bar-B-Q'r at: http://web.infoave.net/~amwil/Index.htm

What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless,
whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism
or the holy name of liberty or democracy?


hey mike,

i think we live in the same neck of the woods. r/h f/m area? it's rare to run
into
someone on this news group from my area so i thought i'd say howdy.
there's a poster here on rfc named 'curely sue' and she has a web page up
that gives more info than you ever want to know about the baking soda /
baking powder issue. ----
http://users.rcn.com/sue.interport/food/bakgsoda.html



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Old 22-04-2006, 01:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 65
Default baking soda vs baking powder

AC wrote:
snip
hey mike,

i think we live in the same neck of the woods. r/h f/m area? it's rare to run
into
someone on this news group from my area so i thought i'd say howdy.
there's a poster here on rfc named 'curely sue' and she has a web page up

snip
Hey AC,

I work in F/M area and visit R/H often to see friends and shop in the
Big City, (grin) We live North of L/C.

Thanks for the link!

--
Regards,

Piedmont

The Practical Bar-B-Q'r at: http://web.infoave.net/~amwil/Index.htm

What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless,
whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism
or the holy name of liberty or democracy?

Mahatma Gandhi, "Non-Violence in Peace and War"
















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