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Old 15-06-2021, 09:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 19:48:59 +0100, S Viemeister
wrote:

On 15/06/2021 19:26, Sheldon Martin wrote:
On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 16:16:00 +0100, S Viemeister
wrote:

On 15/06/2021 14:43, Sheldon Martin wrote:

It's easy enough to temporarily connect your stove to a propane
bottle... it's no big deal to switch between natural gas and propane
and then switch back,

Changing the orifice on a gas stove takes time and knowledge. Natural
gas and propane require different sizes.


Very easy, just swap a plastic disk with a different orifice.

Plastic??? Brass. And yes, they are round, but they are more tubular
than disc-like.
Obviously it's not something you have ever done. Nor should you.


Ask them, theyre here. "You can stop saying that now. Thank you."
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Old 15-06-2021, 09:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 13:22:44 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Simmons
wrote:

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 8:55:17 AM UTC-5, Mike Duffy wrote:
On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 00:05:14 -0700, dsi1 wrote:


I might be able to produce a flame by heating up a pan until very
hot and then dumping alcohol in the pan. Would that work? I can't say.

Try diethyl ether. Oftimes it is sold as a 'carburator helper' to give a
bit of boost to help start recalcitrant engines. It has a flash point
under 100 C, i.e. it will ignite just with contacting live steam.

NB: Do this outdoors & upwind, &c.

And tell your buddy, "Hold my beer."

--Bryan

Ask them, theyre here. "You can stop saying that now. Thank you."
--
Bruce
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Old 15-06-2021, 11:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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dsi1 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 9:20:39 AM UTC-10, Mike Duffy wrote:
On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 10:52:05 -0700, dsi1 wrote:

I loved rebuilding carburetors - just don't let your check
balls roll off the table.

You youngster. In my day all the carburator innards were spring-propelled
off into the grass. Or maybe that was my experience at lock-smithing.


Yes, I remember now. You old guys had to work on carburetors outside during the day because Edison hadn't invented the light bulb yet. As I recall, "starter fluid" was made from whale blubber. Back then, all you had was cans of WD-2, which was also made from whale blubber. Even whitewall tires were made from whale blubber. I can barely imagine how hard life must have been for you ancient ones!


And God, just think about what they had to use for hearing aides?

Poor Hawaiians! *******s stumbled around looking for a smart Asian
to sell them a chinese hearing aide for $10000.

Still going on today. An Asian shame.




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Old 16-06-2021, 12:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 15 Jun 2021 16:14:53 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2021-06-15 2:02 p.m., dsi1 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 5:24:08 AM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
O

My parent's house had gas appliances. I remember watching a repair
guy working on the clothes dryer. He said that the jets in the dryer
was set up for propane, not natural gas which is what we had. That
was nice of him explain that to a pesky kid. He switched out the jet
to a bigger one and that dryer was noticeably louder - it sounded
like a blowtorch. Clothes dried a lot faster too. Awesome!


You probably had less lint and clothes etc probably lasted longer. It is
the tumbling that causes the lint to break off from the cloth. When my
brother got a gas dryer he noted that clothes dried a lot faster and
there was a lot less lint.


Lint, OMG. All my life I've forgotten to worry about lint. Thanks for
the heads-up!

I'm looking forward to "Lint and I, A Journey", by Dave Smith.

--
Bruce
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Old 16-06-2021, 01:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 6:08:16 AM UTC-4, dsi1 wrote:
On Monday, June 14, 2021 at 11:47:06 PM UTC-10, Cindy Hamilton
wrote:
On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 5:27:49 AM UTC-4, dsi1 wrote:
On Monday, June 14, 2021 at 10:35:39 PM UTC-10, Cindy Hamilton
wrote:
On Monday, June 14, 2021 at 5:32:52 PM UTC-4, dsi1 wrote:
On Monday, June 14, 2021 at 9:45:44 AM UTC-10, cshenk
wrote:
Michael Trew wrote:

On 6/13/2021 1:26 PM, John Kuthe wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5,
Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a
double recipe of toll house cookies, but it somehow
came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In a house
without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my
smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my
stove to save on heat in the kitchen, and supper
was just a cold chipped chopped ham and provolone
sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately
needing defrosted as well. I suppose it's all
better than snow, however.

I turn of my stove's pilot light permanently! I went
all ELECTRIC! And I have my gas company come and
pull their gas meter from my house!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...

Natural gas is dirt cheap around here, I'll keep my
stove. I don't care about the oven, other than the
cost, but I hate cooking on an electric stove top.
Same here but it's all in what you are used to. Gas is
far more flexible than electric or induction.
It's not a good option for homes with kids and for elderly
cooks.
Really? Millions of kids have grown up in houses with gas
ranges. Millions of elderly cooks use gas ranges.

I think you're projecting your own fears.

Cindy Hamilton
Around 180,000 house fires start in the kitchen every year.
Induction ranges are inherently safer because the cooktops do
not heat up. Do the math. You're obviously projecting your own
ignorance.
How many of those house fires are directly related to gas
cooktops?

How many of them are related to dumbass behaviors like putting
wet food into hot oil and creating a grease fire? How many of
them are electrical fires?

Your facile and poorly researched comment is worthless.

Cindy Hamilton

I can't tell you the breakdown of fires caused by gas and electric
burners. The reality is that you can easily light a combustible
material with gas or electric burners. Try it yourself if you think
it's unlikely. You can't do that with an induction cooktop. This is
just another one of your idiotic gamesmanship ploys. Yoose gets the
last move - count me out of your dumb game.


Ok. Here's my last move.

I have used gas stoves all my life. I've occasionally caused a
potholder to smolder. Since we've dismantled our kitchen for
remodeling, I've been using an induction burner. I'm well aware of
its characteristics.

Fires are less likely with an induction cooktop. The risk with other
cooktops is small enough that they're not outlawing them. Your fears
are unfounded and overblown.

Cindy Hamilton


I think he just likes what he thinks of as 'modern and shiny'.


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Old 16-06-2021, 04:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 6/15/2021 1:11 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 6/14/2021 10:25 AM, Michael Trew wrote:
On 6/13/2021 10:24 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 6/13/2021 9:43 PM, Michael Trew wrote:

The VAST majority of your electric is derived from COAL, John...


No one seems to understand that. Same deal with these electric cars.
Yes, they are not polluting locally, but on top of fossil fuel plants,
literally about half of all electricity is lost during transmission...
that's terribly inefficient, and adds up to twice of the claimed
pollution of whatever fossil fuel the plant burns.

You need to brush up on the facts. Electricity loss is about 5% in
transmission.
https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=105&t=3
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that
electricity transmission and distribution (T&D) losses equaled about 5%
of the electricity transmitted and distributed in the United States in
2015 through 2019.


http://insideenergy.org/2015/11/06/l...and-your-plug/



Energy lost in transmission and distribution: About 6% 2% in
transmission and 4% in distribution or 69 trillion Btus in the

U.S. in
2013

In the future, other forms of generation will take over. In our area
solar is viable and I get some of my juice from solar.

EVs have a long way to go to be ideal, but there are many new
technologies in the works to reduce or eliminate lithium, make faster
charging times, longer distance.

People thought the automobile was just a fad for the wealthy too. It
will take years but it will be viable.



I meant to say distribution losses = 50% -- not transmission losses.


https://electrical-engineering-porta...ission-lines-1



I'm sure it will eventually be viable. However, as it sits now, between
fossil fuel power plants and environmentally harmful lithium mining, you
can't say that you are making the "Green choice" with an electric car.

Thank you for proving the electric automobile is a better use of energy.

You are probably aghast that 50% of the energy generated is lost. Bad as
it seem, that is much better than the internal combustion engine.

How efficient is an internal combustion engine?
20 percent
Most internal combustion engines are only 20 percent thermally
efficient, according to Green Car Reports. In addition to heat, the
various systems required to run the engine all take energy that could
potentially be put to use propelling the vehicle.Mar 1, 2018

Toyota has done better, but still not as good as an EV. Don't forget the
cost of energy to transport gas to the local stations.
https://www.thedrive.com/tech/18919/...0-liter-engine




I honestly thought that engines were less than 20% efficient. I know
their efficiency is particularly low, but I have yet to see someone do
the math and calculate actual pollution and waste from electric
generation/transmission and from creating the batteries for electric
cars... then compare it to gasoline cars. Of course, that would vary on
your electric utility, but people don't seem to take in that electric
cars aren't as green as they think that they are.
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Old 16-06-2021, 04:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 6/15/2021 4:14 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2021-06-15 2:02 p.m., dsi1 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 5:24:08 AM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
O

My parent's house had gas appliances. I remember watching a repair
guy working on the clothes dryer. He said that the jets in the dryer
was set up for propane, not natural gas which is what we had. That
was nice of him explain that to a pesky kid. He switched out the jet
to a bigger one and that dryer was noticeably louder - it sounded
like a blowtorch. Clothes dried a lot faster too. Awesome!


You probably had less lint and clothes etc probably lasted longer. It is
the tumbling that causes the lint to break off from the cloth. When my
brother got a gas dryer he noted that clothes dried a lot faster and
there was a lot less lint.


I have an apartment size gas dryer... I've thought about hooking it up
next to my huge ancient 1950's GE electric dryer to compare the two.
I've always wanted a NG dryer.
  #113 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-06-2021, 04:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 6/15/2021 2:16 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 5:25:38 AM UTC-10, Michael Trew wrote:
On 6/15/2021 3:11 AM, dsi1 wrote:
On Monday, June 14, 2021 at 6:40:50 PM UTC-10, Michael Trew wrote:
On 6/14/2021 3:45 PM, cshenk wrote:
Michael Trew wrote:

On 6/13/2021 1:26 PM, John Kuthe wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe
of toll house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9
dozen cookies. In a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day,
that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on
heat in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped
ham and provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge
desperately needing defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better
than snow, however.

I turn of my stove's pilot light permanently! I went all ELECTRIC!
And I have my gas company come and pull their gas meter from my
house!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...

Natural gas is dirt cheap around here, I'll keep my stove. I don't
care about the oven, other than the cost, but I hate cooking on an
electric stove top.

Same here but it's all in what you are used to. Gas is far more
flexible than electric or induction.
I'd never want induction. If my cast iron pans don't work, it's a
useless stove to me.

Cast iron works great with induction. My guess is that an induction range works faster than gas because you're not heating the pan by conduction. The pan actually acts as a heating element. These days there's no need to use cast iron. Carbon steel pans are lighter and bear a cooking surface uncannily similar to cast iron.

I like my cast iron pans.

I head that they did not work with induction, but to be fair, I can't
say that I've ever tested it. There was a pan that did not work with
induction stoves at all. Was it aluminum? Maybe just my old enamel
pots (which I do still use)?

Cast iron and any glass top stove are not a good combination. I
wouldn't want a glass top stove; far too easy to scratch with any pan or
while cleaning.


Cast iron works well with an induction range. The problem, as you say, is you shouldn't use it on a glass top. Some people will disagree with me but that's just my particular feeling on the matter. It just ain't right. I didn't have any problem with carbon steel pans on the glass top. As it goes, if a pan is not magnetic, it won't work at all. Some pans will work better on an induction range than others. I have a pan that won't get hot enough on the range. That's too bad because it's a beautiful pan. I was seduced by its good looks in the store, but mostly, it was a dud. I think it has something to do with a pan's intrinsic property i.e., its magnetic permeability.


Ah, yes. No aluminum pans.


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