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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-06-2021, 07:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 22:24:26 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 6/13/2021 9:43 PM, Michael Trew wrote:

The VAST majority of your electric is derived from COAL, John...


No one seems to understand that.* Same deal with these electric cars.
Yes, they are not polluting locally, but on top of fossil fuel plants,
literally about half of all electricity is lost during transmission...
that's terribly inefficient, and adds up to twice of the claimed
pollution of whatever fossil fuel the plant burns.


You need to brush up on the facts. Electricity loss is about 5% in
transmission.
https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=105&t=3
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that
electricity transmission and distribution (T&D) losses equaled about 5%
of the electricity transmitted and distributed in the United States in
2015 through 2019.

http://insideenergy.org/2015/11/06/l...and-your-plug/
Energy lost in transmission and distribution: About 6% – 2% in
transmission and 4% in distribution – or 69 trillion Btus in the U.S. in
2013

In the future, other forms of generation will take over. In our area
solar is viable and I get some of my juice from solar.

EVs have a long way to go to be ideal, but there are many new
technologies in the works to reduce or eliminate lithium, make faster
charging times, longer distance.

People thought the automobile was just a fad for the wealthy too. It
will take years but it will be viable.

Ask them, theyre here. "You can stop saying that now. Thank you."
--
Bruce

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Old 14-06-2021, 07:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 18:57:46 -0700 (PDT), GM
wrote:

Michael Trew wrote:

On 6/13/2021 1:35 PM, GM wrote:
On Sunday, June 13, 2021 at 12:27:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe of toll
house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In
a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on heat
in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped ham and
provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately needing
defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better than snow, however.
I turn of my stove's pilot light permanently! I went all ELECTRIC! And I have my gas company come and pull their gas meter from my house!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...


The VAST majority of your electric is derived from COAL, John...

No one seems to understand that. Same deal with these electric cars.
Yes, they are not polluting locally, but on top of fossil fuel plants,
literally about half of all electricity is lost during transmission...
that's terribly inefficient, and adds up to twice of the claimed
pollution of whatever fossil fuel the plant burns.



EV's can be *far* worse as consumption and disposal of fuel and raw materials goes...from the original mining of the battery/vehicle materials to fuel consumed to the eventual disposal of those batteries/vehicle materials ...

An example of hare - brained environmental "thinking" is California's mandate to rapidly switch to EV's. Much has been debated about this, here is one piece:

https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-e...-cut-emissions

California should let carbon market, not mandate, cut emissions

BY GEOFF COOPER, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR — 10/05/20

"California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) sent shock waves through energy and climate policy circles recently when he ordered that all new passenger cars and trucks sold in the state must be “zero-emission” by 2035.

Of course, in California regulatory lingo, the term “zero-emission vehicle” (or “ZEV”) is shorthand for an electric or fuel cell vehicle. Thus, starting 15 years from now, Gov. Newsom’s order would essentially ban the sale of cars and trucks that use liquid fuels in internal combustion engines and mandate the sale of battery electric, plug-in hybrid and fuel cell vehicles.

There’s no question that the executive order is as bold as it is fashionable. But is it realistic? And is it truly necessary?

Indeed, the goal behind the ZEV mandate — combating climate change —is laudable and absolutely should be pursued with urgency. As producers of renewable liquid fuels, confronting climate change and reducing carbon emissions is our goal too.

In California, the transportation sector accounts for more than 50 percent of the state’s greenhouse gas emissions. And nationwide, transportation is the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We can — and must — do more to reduce carbon pollution, and we need to act quickly.

But let’s get a few things straight.

First, there is no such thing as a zero-emission vehicle. Calling an electric vehicle a ZEV is like calling a donkey a unicorn — it sounds nice, but it simply isn’t real. Just because there aren’t any greenhouse gas emissions coming out the tailpipe of an electric vehicle doesn’t mean the vehicle and its fuel are emissions-free. The electricity that powers the vehicle had to come from somewhere. And, if it comes from fossil fuels, the true carbon impacts of a “ZEV” can be as bad or worse than the impacts of a vehicle running on straight gasoline.

It’s true that California gets a significant share (about 30 percent) of its electricity from clean, renewable sources like biomass, wind, solar and hydro. It’s also true that an electric vehicle running on these sources of electricity offers a far smaller carbon footprint than a vehicle running on gasoline. But roughly one-third of the electricity produced in California is generated by natural gas-fired plants. Another one-third of the state’s electricity comes in from other states and, yes, some of those places still use coal in their power plants. Nationwide, fossil fuels like coal and natural gas still generate 63 percent of our electricity, with 20 percent coming from nuclear and 18 percent from renewables..."

/

Ask them, theyre here. "You can stop saying that now. Thank you."
--
Bruce
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Old 14-06-2021, 02:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 21:37:23 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 6/13/2021 12:52 AM, GM wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe of toll
house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In
a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on heat
in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped ham and
provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately needing
defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better than snow, however.



Years ago I used to do a lot of home canning. I didn't have A/C, and I'd often choose the hottest days to can. It would be SO hot that it would be a "transcedental" experience - and accompanied by LOTS of ice - cold beer...

Couldn't do that now, I'd surely croak...


I have grandma's old huge enamel pot with the wire rack in the bottom.
I might pick up some Ball jars and try my hand at canning this year. I
planted a dozen tomato plants, so why not?


Depends what type of tomatoes, not all can well. Salad tomatoes (the
type most grow) are too watery for canning and sauce. Long simmering
to reduce water ends up with brown tomato sauce and a burnt flavor.
I grow a lot of Romas and to preserve I freeze, a lot safer and saves
storage space. I use cubical plastic containers, stack like bricks.
A Foley food mill removes skins, cores, and seeds. Prepare sauce with
minimal cooking and freeze.
It costs a lot less and is far safer to buy ones tomato products by
the case in #10 cans.
A large home vegetable garden is a lot of work and expence, we do it
for the enjoyment, no monetary savings.
We grow a lot of different tomatoes, most are eaten as salad tomatoes,
many are grilled.... at seasons end we fry green tomatoes and pickle
green tomatoes along with Kirby cukes.
Factory canned removes excess water with a huge vacuum tower (silo
sized), same method used for frozen OJ concentrate, and tomato
paste... minimally heated and water vapor vacuumed off... equipment is
too costly for home use.
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Old 14-06-2021, 03:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 6/14/2021 9:51 AM, Sheldon Martin wrote:
On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 21:37:23 -0400, Michael
wrote:

On 6/13/2021 12:52 AM, GM wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe of toll
house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In
a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on heat
in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped ham and
provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately needing
defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better than snow, however.


Years ago I used to do a lot of home canning. I didn't have A/C, and I'd often choose the hottest days to can. It would be SO hot that it would be a "transcedental" experience - and accompanied by LOTS of ice - cold beer...

Couldn't do that now, I'd surely croak...


I have grandma's old huge enamel pot with the wire rack in the bottom.
I might pick up some Ball jars and try my hand at canning this year. I
planted a dozen tomato plants, so why not?


Depends what type of tomatoes, not all can well. Salad tomatoes (the
type most grow) are too watery for canning and sauce. Long simmering
to reduce water ends up with brown tomato sauce and a burnt flavor.
I grow a lot of Romas and to preserve I freeze, a lot safer and saves
storage space. I use cubical plastic containers, stack like bricks.
A Foley food mill removes skins, cores, and seeds. Prepare sauce with
minimal cooking and freeze.
It costs a lot less and is far safer to buy ones tomato products by
the case in #10 cans.
A large home vegetable garden is a lot of work and expence, we do it
for the enjoyment, no monetary savings.
We grow a lot of different tomatoes, most are eaten as salad tomatoes,
many are grilled.... at seasons end we fry green tomatoes and pickle
green tomatoes along with Kirby cukes.
Factory canned removes excess water with a huge vacuum tower (silo
sized), same method used for frozen OJ concentrate, and tomato
paste... minimally heated and water vapor vacuumed off... equipment is
too costly for home use.



I planted mostly Roma tomatoes. I figured good for sauces and recipes.
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Old 14-06-2021, 03:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 09:51:38 -0400, Sheldon Martin
wrote:

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 21:37:23 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 6/13/2021 12:52 AM, GM wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe of toll
house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In
a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on heat
in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped ham and
provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately needing
defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better than snow, however.


Years ago I used to do a lot of home canning. I didn't have A/C, and I'd often choose the hottest days to can. It would be SO hot that it would be a "transcedental" experience - and accompanied by LOTS of ice - cold beer...

Couldn't do that now, I'd surely croak...


I have grandma's old huge enamel pot with the wire rack in the bottom.
I might pick up some Ball jars and try my hand at canning this year. I
planted a dozen tomato plants, so why not?


Depends what type of tomatoes, not all can well. Salad tomatoes (the
type most grow) are too watery for canning and sauce. Long simmering
to reduce water ends up with brown tomato sauce and a burnt flavor.
I grow a lot of Romas and to preserve I freeze, a lot safer and saves
storage space. I use cubical plastic containers, stack like bricks.
A Foley food mill removes skins, cores, and seeds. Prepare sauce with
minimal cooking and freeze.
It costs a lot less and is far safer to buy ones tomato products by
the case in #10 cans.
A large home vegetable garden is a lot of work and expence, we do it
for the enjoyment, no monetary savings.
We grow a lot of different tomatoes, most are eaten as salad tomatoes,
many are grilled.... at seasons end we fry green tomatoes and pickle
green tomatoes along with Kirby cukes.
Factory canned removes excess water with a huge vacuum tower (silo
sized), same method used for frozen OJ concentrate, and tomato
paste... minimally heated and water vapor vacuumed off... equipment is
too costly for home use.


Non-paste tomatoes (regular eating tomatoes) are fine for home canning
just as they are. No boiling down needed. For decades I used a quart
of home canned tomatoes to make caseroles, chili, sauce for pasta
dinner. If you run out of cannng jars you can freeze the tomatoes
whole with skins on. When you need tomatoes for cooking simply remove
the frozen tomatoes from the freezer, run hot water over them and the
skin will slip off. You can also skin and chop them and measure out
your most common used size and freeze that way. It's true that the
paste tomatoes have less water in them but I wouldn't let that deter
me from canning or freezing the tomatoes I have in my garden.
Janet US


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Old 14-06-2021, 03:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 6/13/2021 10:24 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 6/13/2021 9:43 PM, Michael Trew wrote:

The VAST majority of your electric is derived from COAL, John...


No one seems to understand that. Same deal with these electric cars.
Yes, they are not polluting locally, but on top of fossil fuel plants,
literally about half of all electricity is lost during transmission...
that's terribly inefficient, and adds up to twice of the claimed
pollution of whatever fossil fuel the plant burns.


You need to brush up on the facts. Electricity loss is about 5% in
transmission.
https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=105&t=3
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that
electricity transmission and distribution (T&D) losses equaled about 5%
of the electricity transmitted and distributed in the United States in
2015 through 2019.

http://insideenergy.org/2015/11/06/l...and-your-plug/

Energy lost in transmission and distribution: About 6% €“ 2% in
transmission and 4% in distribution €“ or 69 trillion Btus in the U.S. in
2013

In the future, other forms of generation will take over. In our area
solar is viable and I get some of my juice from solar.

EVs have a long way to go to be ideal, but there are many new
technologies in the works to reduce or eliminate lithium, make faster
charging times, longer distance.

People thought the automobile was just a fad for the wealthy too. It
will take years but it will be viable.



I meant to say distribution losses = 50% -- not transmission losses.

https://electrical-engineering-porta...ission-lines-1

I'm sure it will eventually be viable. However, as it sits now, between
fossil fuel power plants and environmentally harmful lithium mining, you
can't say that you are making the "Green choice" with an electric car.
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Old 14-06-2021, 04:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 21:43:11 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 6/13/2021 1:35 PM, GM wrote:
On Sunday, June 13, 2021 at 12:27:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe of toll
house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In
a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on heat
in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped ham and
provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately needing
defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better than snow, however.
I turn of my stove's pilot light permanently! I went all ELECTRIC! And I have my gas company come and pull their gas meter from my house!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...



The VAST majority of your electric is derived from COAL, John...


No one seems to understand that. Same deal with these electric cars.
Yes, they are not polluting locally, but on top of fossil fuel plants,
literally about half of all electricity is lost during transmission...
that's terribly inefficient, and adds up to twice of the claimed
pollution of whatever fossil fuel the plant burns.


All true, ask any electrician and they'll tell you about the terrific
losses from transmission, much is lost as heat. A tremendous amount
of electicity is wasted by step up, step down transformers, known as
hysteresis... no that's not a sexual term, has nothing to do with
hysterectomies.
Electric powered vehicles save nothing, in fact they waste energy and
pollute heavily from burning coal. Those heavy transmission wires
used to charge EVs cause cancer. I'd not be surprised to learn that
driving an electric vehicle is a carsogenic, as are solar panels...
any Dermatologist will tell you how exposure to sunlight causes skin
cancer... people with their roof covered with solar panels are
inviting solar rays.
Electric vehicles have been around for a long time, mostly as delivery
vans in large cities, especially diaper service delivery(Pilgrim). So
now disposables are used, how is that not pollution? The word
'disposable' is synonimous with 'pollution'.
Kootch possesses one of the lowest IQs on the internet.
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Old 14-06-2021, 05:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,452
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Sheldon Martin wrote:
On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 21:43:11 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 6/13/2021 1:35 PM, GM wrote:
On Sunday, June 13, 2021 at 12:27:02 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe of toll
house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In
a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on heat
in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped ham and
provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately needing
defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better than snow, however.
I turn of my stove's pilot light permanently! I went all ELECTRIC! And I have my gas company come and pull their gas meter from my house!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...


The VAST majority of your electric is derived from COAL, John...


No one seems to understand that. Same deal with these electric cars.
Yes, they are not polluting locally, but on top of fossil fuel plants,
literally about half of all electricity is lost during transmission...
that's terribly inefficient, and adds up to twice of the claimed
pollution of whatever fossil fuel the plant burns.


All true, ask any electrician and they'll tell you about the terrific
losses from transmission, much is lost as heat. A tremendous amount
of electicity is wasted by step up, step down transformers, known as
hysteresis... no that's not a sexual term, has nothing to do with
hysterectomies.
Electric powered vehicles save nothing, in fact they waste energy and
pollute heavily from burning coal. Those heavy transmission wires
used to charge EVs cause cancer. I'd not be surprised to learn that
driving an electric vehicle is a carsogenic, as are solar panels...
any Dermatologist will tell you how exposure to sunlight causes skin
cancer... people with their roof covered with solar panels are
inviting solar rays.
Electric vehicles have been around for a long time, mostly as delivery
vans in large cities, especially diaper service delivery(Pilgrim). So
now disposables are used, how is that not pollution? The word
'disposable' is synonimous with 'pollution'.
Kootch possesses one of the lowest IQs on the internet.


Yoose a true polymath Popeye!


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Old 14-06-2021, 08:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 559
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Michael Trew wrote:

On 6/13/2021 12:52 AM, GM wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe
of toll house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9
dozen cookies. In a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day,
that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on
heat in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped
ham and provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge
desperately needing defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better
than snow, however.



Years ago I used to do a lot of home canning. I didn't have A/C,
and I'd often choose the hottest days to can. It would be SO hot
that it would be a "transcedental" experience - and accompanied by
LOTS of ice - cold beer...

Couldn't do that now, I'd surely croak...


I have grandma's old huge enamel pot with the wire rack in the
bottom. I might pick up some Ball jars and try my hand at canning
this year. I planted a dozen tomato plants, so why not?


I've done jellies, jams and pickles at times. Fun to do.
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-06-2021, 08:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Mar 2021
Posts: 559
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Sheldon Martin wrote:

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 21:37:23 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 6/13/2021 12:52 AM, GM wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew

wrote: I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double
recipe of toll house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about
9 dozen cookies. In a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day,
that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on

heat in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped
ham and provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge
desperately needing defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better
than snow, however.


Years ago I used to do a lot of home canning. I didn't have A/C,

and I'd often choose the hottest days to can. It would be SO hot
that it would be a "transcedental" experience - and accompanied by
LOTS of ice - cold beer...

Couldn't do that now, I'd surely croak...


I have grandma's old huge enamel pot with the wire rack in the
bottom. I might pick up some Ball jars and try my hand at canning
this year. I planted a dozen tomato plants, so why not?


Depends what type of tomatoes, not all can well. Salad tomatoes (the
type most grow) are too watery for canning and sauce. Long simmering
to reduce water ends up with brown tomato sauce and a burnt flavor.


I just freeze them as is in bags. Once you defrost a bit in warm
water, the skins slip right off.

(snips)

A large home vegetable garden is a lot of work and expence, we do it
for the enjoyment, no monetary savings.


Actually there can be monetary savings in some things. Lettuce makes a
good example as do green onions. For green onions, I just get some in
early spring, use the tops and plant the bottoms and they come back up
for several years. Generally I can 'crop my own' from late March to
around Christmas.

Lettuce is another one. 6 weeks from seeding to cropping for most
types. I've tried Gai Lan (Chinese Broccoli) for the first time and
had great suscess from a single plant. I keep chopping some off and it
keeps coming back. Seedling plant was 1.19$ and I've already cropped
about 4$ worth.

Still, yes, we do it for fun.

Fruit trees are another matter. If you understand proper pollenators
for your type, those yield a HUGE crop. I'm looking at about 350
estimated apples this year. Being far north of me, you'd be apt more
to reds. A Courtland and a Red Delicious would do well. Plant within
15 feet of each other and let them do their thing.

https://www.acnursery.com/resources/...ts/apple-chart

No real expense other than the tree. Save your eggshells and crush a
bit then toss on the ground under them. Apple trees are calcium
hungry. 2 eggshells a day is more than enough though.


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Old 14-06-2021, 08:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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US Janet wrote:

On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 09:51:38 -0400, Sheldon Martin
wrote:

On Sun, 13 Jun 2021 21:37:23 -0400, Michael Trew
wrote:

On 6/13/2021 12:52 AM, GM wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew

wrote: I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double
recipe of toll house cookies, but it somehow came out to be
about 9 dozen cookies. In a house without A/C on a near 90
degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save

on heat in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped
chopped ham and provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge
desperately needing defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better
than snow, however.


Years ago I used to do a lot of home canning. I didn't have A/C,

and I'd often choose the hottest days to can. It would be SO hot
that it would be a "transcedental" experience - and accompanied by
LOTS of ice - cold beer...

Couldn't do that now, I'd surely croak...

I have grandma's old huge enamel pot with the wire rack in the
bottom. I might pick up some Ball jars and try my hand at
canning this year. I planted a dozen tomato plants, so why not?


Depends what type of tomatoes, not all can well. Salad tomatoes (the
type most grow) are too watery for canning and sauce. Long
simmering to reduce water ends up with brown tomato sauce and a
burnt flavor. I grow a lot of Romas and to preserve I freeze, a
lot safer and saves storage space. I use cubical plastic
containers, stack like bricks. A Foley food mill removes skins,
cores, and seeds. Prepare sauce with minimal cooking and freeze.
It costs a lot less and is far safer to buy ones tomato products by
the case in #10 cans.
A large home vegetable garden is a lot of work and expence, we do it
for the enjoyment, no monetary savings.
We grow a lot of different tomatoes, most are eaten as salad
tomatoes, many are grilled.... at seasons end we fry green tomatoes
and pickle green tomatoes along with Kirby cukes.
Factory canned removes excess water with a huge vacuum tower (silo
sized), same method used for frozen OJ concentrate, and tomato
paste... minimally heated and water vapor vacuumed off... equipment
is too costly for home use.


Non-paste tomatoes (regular eating tomatoes) are fine for home canning
just as they are. No boiling down needed. For decades I used a quart
of home canned tomatoes to make caseroles, chili, sauce for pasta
dinner. If you run out of cannng jars you can freeze the tomatoes
whole with skins on. When you need tomatoes for cooking simply remove
the frozen tomatoes from the freezer, run hot water over them and the
skin will slip off. You can also skin and chop them and measure out
your most common used size and freeze that way. It's true that the
paste tomatoes have less water in them but I wouldn't let that deter
me from canning or freezing the tomatoes I have in my garden.
Janet US


LOL, I just posted that bit on freezing as is. Really easy.

Last night we had fried green tomatoes with dinner. We also had yellow
squash and Gai Lan from the garden with leftover butter baked Perch.

Looks like the bell peppers are doing very well also. Bunnies got my
carrot tops though. Ah well. Some may work out still.
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Old 14-06-2021, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 559
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Michael Trew wrote:

On 6/13/2021 1:26 PM, John Kuthe wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe
of toll house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9
dozen cookies. In a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day,
that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on
heat in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped
ham and provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge
desperately needing defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better
than snow, however.


I turn of my stove's pilot light permanently! I went all ELECTRIC!
And I have my gas company come and pull their gas meter from my
house!

John Kuthe, RN, BSN...


Natural gas is dirt cheap around here, I'll keep my stove. I don't
care about the oven, other than the cost, but I hate cooking on an
electric stove top.


Same here but it's all in what you are used to. Gas is far more
flexible than electric or induction.
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Old 14-06-2021, 08:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Michael Trew wrote:

On 6/13/2021 12:52 AM, GM wrote:
On Saturday, June 12, 2021 at 11:29:00 PM UTC-5, Michael Trew wrote:
I'm not sure what recently compelled me to make a double recipe of toll
house cookies, but it somehow came out to be about 9 dozen cookies. In
a house without A/C on a near 90 degree day, that wasn't my smartest idea.

I decided to turn off the the pilot lights on my stove to save on heat
in the kitchen, and supper was just a cold chipped chopped ham and
provolone sandwich. The humidity has my fridge desperately needing
defrosted as well. I suppose it's all better than snow, however.



Years ago I used to do a lot of home canning. I didn't have A/C, and I'd often choose the hottest days to can. It would be SO hot that it would be a "transcedental" experience - and accompanied by LOTS of ice - cold beer....

Couldn't do that now, I'd surely croak...

I have grandma's old huge enamel pot with the wire rack in the bottom.
I might pick up some Ball jars and try my hand at canning this year. I
planted a dozen tomato plants, so why not?



I made a lot of stuff for holiday giving. Brandied cherries, pickled okra, chow - chow, and dilly beans were always a HUGE hit, makes a unique gift. I'd use pint jars for the gifts, a recipient would get two or more jars, fancily garnished with a nice ribbon and labelled...peeps would "oooh" and "aaah" when receiving...

Cantaloupe and watermelon pickles are great, and also something "unusual",...

You can also make refrigerator pickles, right now I am using up some fresh and frozen stuff to make corn relish (red/green peppers, celery, red onion, sliced garlic, frozen corn, diced cukes), I always have this on hand...very easy to make...

Wiki: "How do you make refrigerator pickles?

How to Make Refrigerator Pickles: Step 1: Fill clean jar with thinly sliced cucumbers (ideally Kirby). Step 2: Stir brine ingredients together (kosher salt, vinegar and chopped fresh dill) and pour over cucumber slices. Step 3: Close jar lid and shake to distribute brine. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours then enjoy!"

The only "dud" I had was ketchup, tried several times, but the result was always poor, this despite following exact directions...

It is *critical* you follow canning safety guidelines (but you surely already know that). I once made a batch of tomatoes that caused several of us (we were at a cookout) to become quite ill, in hindsight we were very lucky that it was not worse...

Go he

https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/commu...-botulism.html

Home Canning and Botulism

Home canning is an excellent way to preserve garden produce and share it with family and friends, but it can be risky€”or even deadly€”if not done correctly and safely.

Its summertime and time to harvest the delicious produce youve been growing. You may be thinking about home canning your garden goodies to preserve them. But beware! If home canning is not done the proper way, your canned vegetables and fruits (as well as other foods, including meats and seafood) could cause botulism..."


--
GM
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Old 14-06-2021, 09:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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GM wrote:
It is*critical* you follow canning safety guidelines (but you surely already know that). I once made a batch of tomatoes that caused several of us (we were at a cookout) to become quite ill, in hindsight we were very lucky that it was not worse...


What was the root cause?

It's pretty hard to screw up tomatoes, as they are acidic.
(pressure canner isn't needed). Boiling water bath works fine.




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Old 14-06-2021, 09:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Hank Rogers wrote:

GM wrote:
It is*critical* you follow canning safety guidelines (but you surely already know that). I once made a batch of tomatoes that caused several of us (we were at a cookout) to become quite ill, in hindsight we were very lucky that it was not worse...


What was the root cause?

It's pretty hard to screw up tomatoes, as they are acidic.
(pressure canner isn't needed). Boiling water bath works fine.



I dunno what happened...I used a boiling water bath...

Only sick for a day, but we got severe intestinal upset and jaundice. This happened at the cookout, and also a bit later with another jar, with just myself...

Just found this. other sites also recommend pressure canning, not a hot water bath:

https://www.foodnetwork.com/how-to/a...o-can-tomatoes

"...Unlike pickles and most fruit preserves, tomatoes are comparatively low in acidity, and so must be acidified in order to be canned using the standard water-bath method. Foods with a pH higher than 4.6 can harbor botulism bacteria spores; tomatoes are generally right around 4.5, so you're playing with fire if you do not bring the acid level up. Moreover, if you add anything to your tomatoes, such as onions, garlic or basil, you are lowering the acidity further.

Water boils at 212 degrees Farenheit at sea level; this is not sufficient to kill off the botulism spores. By raising the pressure in the cooking environment, you raise the temperature at which water boils. By raising the pressure to 11 pounds, you raise the boiling temperature to about 240 degrees Farenheit, which will kill off the spores.

So, if you intend to do much canning of low-acid foods such as tomatoes, stocks or meats, you may want to invest in a pressure canner. Modern pressure canners are easy and exceedingly safe to use, and you will be able to rest easy knowing that your canned goods are free of toxins..."

--
GM


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