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Old 07-04-2016, 03:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".

"Circulation" is a scientific journal published by Lippincott Williams
& Wilkins for the American Heart Association. The journal publishes
articles related to research in and the practice of cardiovascular
diseases, including observational studies, clinical trials,
epidemiology, health services and outcomes studies, and advances in
applied and basic research. From 1996 to 2004, its impact factor
remained close to 10. As of 2014, its impact factor was 14.43 and it
ranked fourth among journals in the Cardiac and Cardiovascular
Systems, Peripheral Vascular Disease categories.


Can we go back to putting whole milk in our coffee and slurping down
real ice cream? Two recent studies suggest eating full-fat dairy foods
instead of their thinner tasting, low-fat or non-fat counterparts may
help cut the risk for diabetes and obesity. But the research is still
early, experts told CBS News.

Tufts researchers report in the journal Circulation that people who
consumed full-fat dairy products had as much as a 46 percent lower
risk of developing diabetes over the course of the 15-year study
compared with people who opted for skim milk, low-fat yogurt and
low-fat cheese. The research was based on an analysis of blood test
results showing biomarkers of full-fat dairy consumption.

A second study more than 18,000 middle-age women who were part of the
Women's Health Study -- and normal weight, free of cardiovascular
disease, cancer, and diabetes at the start of the research -- found
that those who ate more high-fat dairy had an 8 percent lower chance
of going on to become obese over time compared to those who ate less.
No association was observed with low-fat dairy product intake.

"We saw less weight gain for higher total dairy and high-fat dairy
intake and also a lower risk of becoming overweight and obese in those
who consumed more high-fat dairy," said study author Susanne
Rautiainen, a research fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospital and
Harvard Medical School in Boston.

The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend keeping saturated fat
consumption to less than 10 percent of calories per day. A latte made
with one cup of whole milk, for example, contains 4.6 grams of
saturated fat -- almost a quarter of the daily total.

Dr. Susan Spratt, a diabetes specialist at Duke, told CBS News it's an
interesting study and adds to previous, conflicting findings on diet
and health.


But she pointed out that the Women's Health Study, which has tracked
thousands of participants since 1993, was not a randomized trial, and
said, "We've been burned before on observational studies."

The studies don't answer the question of why eating richer dairy
products may affect diabetes and obesity risk. For years doctors have
recommended sticking with low-fat dairy for heart health and weight
control. The authors of the diabetes and dairy study wrote, "Findings
suggest that either ... dairy fatty acids themselves or other
correlated factors in dairy fat could reduce risk of diabetes."

But it could also be that full-fat dairy foods make people feel more
satisfied so they'll eat less overall.

Spratt, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Duke
University School of Medicine, said, "I think we now understand there
are healthy fats and unhealthy fats; healthy carbohydrates and less
healthy carbohydrates. And fat can improve satiety and that could
reduce total calorie intake. There could be other mechanisms at play.
Patients eating high-fat dairy may be on a high-protein, high-fat diet
(Atkins) and perhaps that is why they are not gaining."

You might not want to toss out your low-fat frozen yogurt yet, though.
Rautiainen told CBS News it's a single observational study. "I don't
think we have the whole story yet. This is something that future
studies need to look at more carefully."


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Old 07-04-2016, 05:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 10:57:29 AM UTC-4, Janet B wrote:
this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".


Major snippage.

I take the middle road. 2% milk, low-fat yogurt sometimes,
full-fat yogurt other times, and real butter when I want
something buttery, but all in moderation. I've reduced
my intake of carbs, but I can't really say I'm even
"low carb", just "not stupid carbs".

We'll see how that plays out over time.

Of course, people want there to be one cause for things,
and a magic bullet to fix problems. The real world
just isn't so accommodating.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 07-04-2016, 06:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

In article ,
Janet B wrote:



Tufts researchers report in the journal Circulation that people who
consumed full-fat dairy products had as much as a 46 percent lower
risk of developing diabetes over the course of the 15-year study
compared with people who opted for skim milk, low-fat yogurt and
low-fat cheese. The research was based on an analysis of blood test
results showing biomarkers of full-fat dairy consumption.


The Schwarzbein Principle came out in 1999. It's only the government
who's pushing the health benefits of a diet made with a chemistry set.
(And still some people think the government should run even more of our
lives)
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Old 07-04-2016, 07:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 10:57:29 AM UTC-4, Janet B wrote:
this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".


Major snippage.

I take the middle road. 2% milk, low-fat yogurt sometimes,
full-fat yogurt other times, and real butter when I want
something buttery, but all in moderation. I've reduced
my intake of carbs, but I can't really say I'm even
"low carb", just "not stupid carbs".

We'll see how that plays out over time.

Of course, people want there to be one cause for things,
and a magic bullet to fix problems. The real world
just isn't so accommodating.

Cindy Hamilton


You are on the right track--keep up the good work! I admire your
commitment and sound approach. Slow and steady wins the race. I say this
as someone who has lost 100+ pounds and been able to keep it off for 9
years, strictly by changing how I ate and what I thought about food. For
all the enjoyment I thought I got from eating before, it pales to the
enjoyment I get now simply because I appreciate the foods and flavors I put
into my mouth a whole lot more.

--
jinx the minx
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Old 07-04-2016, 09:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On 07/04/2016 8:57 AM, Janet B wrote:
this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".


How fashions change! Back in 1972, a British Dr wrote "Pure, White and
Deadly" about the effects of sugar. He was hounded for that. Now, it has
come full circle:
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2...ig-john-yudkin

Graham



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Old 08-04-2016, 12:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On Thu, 07 Apr 2016 12:02:39 -0500, Mark Storkamp
wrote:

In article ,
Janet B wrote:



Tufts researchers report in the journal Circulation that people who
consumed full-fat dairy products had as much as a 46 percent lower
risk of developing diabetes over the course of the 15-year study
compared with people who opted for skim milk, low-fat yogurt and
low-fat cheese. The research was based on an analysis of blood test
results showing biomarkers of full-fat dairy consumption.


The Schwarzbein Principle came out in 1999. It's only the government
who's pushing the health benefits of a diet made with a chemistry set.
(And still some people think the government should run even more of our
lives)


Putting the 'Schwarzbein Principle' aside (since I know nothing about
it), I agree entirely. Anything Govco says health and food should
be viewed by default with suspicion. Same with most (note I said
'most') mainstream medical practitioners, who are notoriously
conservative, and generally too lazy/disinterested to take an active
interest in contemporary thinking if it doesn't involve pharmaceutical
products. Especially regarding nutrition.
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Old 08-04-2016, 01:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On Thu, 7 Apr 2016 09:33:59 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 10:57:29 AM UTC-4, Janet B wrote:
this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".


Major snippage.

I take the middle road. 2% milk, low-fat yogurt sometimes,
full-fat yogurt other times, and real butter when I want
something buttery, but all in moderation. I've reduced
my intake of carbs, but I can't really say I'm even
"low carb", just "not stupid carbs".

We'll see how that plays out over time.

Of course, people want there to be one cause for things,
and a magic bullet to fix problems. The real world
just isn't so accommodating.


I used to do 2% too, but I don't consume much milk or cream so I
switched to full fat milk and heavy cream because they are all purpose
for me. The cream goes in my coffee and takes the place of a flour
slurry in gravy, milk is always used up before it goes bad if I stick
to a quart. Don't ask me how, the specifics range from cereal to
quiche.


--

sf
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Old 08-04-2016, 11:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 8:25:31 PM UTC-4, sf wrote:
On Thu, 7 Apr 2016 09:33:59 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 10:57:29 AM UTC-4, Janet B wrote:
this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".


Major snippage.

I take the middle road. 2% milk, low-fat yogurt sometimes,
full-fat yogurt other times, and real butter when I want
something buttery, but all in moderation. I've reduced
my intake of carbs, but I can't really say I'm even
"low carb", just "not stupid carbs".

We'll see how that plays out over time.

Of course, people want there to be one cause for things,
and a magic bullet to fix problems. The real world
just isn't so accommodating.


I used to do 2% too, but I don't consume much milk or cream so I
switched to full fat milk and heavy cream because they are all purpose
for me. The cream goes in my coffee and takes the place of a flour
slurry in gravy, milk is always used up before it goes bad if I stick
to a quart. Don't ask me how, the specifics range from cereal to
quiche.


Everybody's different. I do about a gallon and a half of milk
every week (including putting it in coffee), but I never make gravy
or quiche. We've just no use for cream (light or heavy) in this
house anymore. I'm habituated to the taste of 2%; whole milk seems
"too much" nowadays.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 08-04-2016, 10:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On 4/8/2016 5:55 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 8:25:31 PM UTC-4, sf wrote:
On Thu, 7 Apr 2016 09:33:59 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 10:57:29 AM UTC-4, Janet B wrote:
this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".

Major snippage.

I take the middle road. 2% milk, low-fat yogurt sometimes,
full-fat yogurt other times, and real butter when I want
something buttery, but all in moderation. I've reduced
my intake of carbs, but I can't really say I'm even
"low carb", just "not stupid carbs".

We'll see how that plays out over time.

Of course, people want there to be one cause for things,
and a magic bullet to fix problems. The real world
just isn't so accommodating.


I used to do 2% too, but I don't consume much milk or cream so I
switched to full fat milk and heavy cream because they are all purpose
for me. The cream goes in my coffee and takes the place of a flour
slurry in gravy, milk is always used up before it goes bad if I stick
to a quart. Don't ask me how, the specifics range from cereal to
quiche.


Everybody's different. I do about a gallon and a half of milk
every week (including putting it in coffee), but I never make gravy
or quiche. We've just no use for cream (light or heavy) in this
house anymore. I'm habituated to the taste of 2%; whole milk seems
"too much" nowadays.


It's good to know other folks like to drink lots of milk and (heavy)
cream, too! I drink a LOT of milk :- Price for 2%-milk when
recently purchased was ~$1.07/gal at Ruler Food (Kroger affiliate akin
to Aldi)! Can't beat that price, and I've even seen it a bit lower than
that price! I can easily drink 2-plus gallons of milk a week!

When I make my home-made morning 'mocha', it's a combination of 2%-milk
with a hefty dose of heavy whipping cream included, along with a wee bit
of sugar. The mixture gets nuked in the mug, then cocoa powder and
instant coffee are added to the hot dairy mixture. Hey, this is a lot
less expensive than buying any 'starbucks' (etc.) whatever G! Works
for me - and that's what ultimately counts. Oh, oh - a quart of heavy
whipping cream at Ruler is only ~$3.59 vs. nearly ~$7/quart at other
local grocery stores - yikes!

Sky

================================
Kitchen Rule #1 - Use the timer!
Kitchen Rule #2 - Cook's choice!
================================

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Old 09-04-2016, 11:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 5:07:28 PM UTC-4, Sky wrote:

It's good to know other folks like to drink lots of milk and (heavy)
cream, too! I drink a LOT of milk :- Price for 2%-milk when
recently purchased was ~$1.07/gal at Ruler Food (Kroger affiliate akin
to Aldi)! Can't beat that price, and I've even seen it a bit lower than
that price! I can easily drink 2-plus gallons of milk a week!


I'm not price sensitive. I think I paid $2.19 last Thursday, which
seemed like a good price. I know if I run out and buy it at the
convenience store, it's more like $3.99 or maybe $4.99 (it happens
so rarely, I can't quite recall which it was).

You made out like a bandit.

Cindy Hamilton


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Old 09-04-2016, 12:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 5:07:28 PM UTC-4, Sky wrote:

It's good to know other folks like to drink lots of milk and (heavy)
cream, too! I drink a LOT of milk :- Price for 2%-milk when
recently purchased was ~$1.07/gal at Ruler Food (Kroger affiliate akin
to Aldi)! Can't beat that price, and I've even seen it a bit lower than
that price! I can easily drink 2-plus gallons of milk a week!


I'm not price sensitive. I think I paid $2.19 last Thursday, which
seemed like a good price. I know if I run out and buy it at the
convenience store, it's more like $3.99 or maybe $4.99 (it happens
so rarely, I can't quite recall which it was).

You made out like a bandit.


I just bought a 1/2 gallon this morning for $1.99. That will last me
several weeks usually unless the milk goes sour sooner. Sometimes milk
can last a long time and other times it can turn sour fairly quickly.
I assume the bad stuff was left out too long before they put it on the
shelf.
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Old 09-04-2016, 04:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Are full-fat dairy foods better for you after all?

On Friday, April 8, 2016 at 4:07:28 PM UTC-5, Sky wrote:
On 4/8/2016 5:55 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 8:25:31 PM UTC-4, sf wrote:
On Thu, 7 Apr 2016 09:33:59 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Thursday, April 7, 2016 at 10:57:29 AM UTC-4, Janet B wrote:
this study was reported in the journal "Circulation".

Major snippage.

I take the middle road. 2% milk, low-fat yogurt sometimes,
full-fat yogurt other times, and real butter when I want
something buttery, but all in moderation. I've reduced
my intake of carbs, but I can't really say I'm even
"low carb", just "not stupid carbs".

We'll see how that plays out over time.

Of course, people want there to be one cause for things,
and a magic bullet to fix problems. The real world
just isn't so accommodating.

I used to do 2% too, but I don't consume much milk or cream so I
switched to full fat milk and heavy cream because they are all purpose
for me. The cream goes in my coffee and takes the place of a flour
slurry in gravy, milk is always used up before it goes bad if I stick
to a quart. Don't ask me how, the specifics range from cereal to
quiche.


Everybody's different. I do about a gallon and a half of milk
every week (including putting it in coffee), but I never make gravy
or quiche. We've just no use for cream (light or heavy) in this
house anymore. I'm habituated to the taste of 2%; whole milk seems
"too much" nowadays.


It's good to know other folks like to drink lots of milk and (heavy)
cream, too! I drink a LOT of milk :- Price for 2%-milk when
recently purchased was ~$1.07/gal at Ruler Food (Kroger affiliate akin
to Aldi)! Can't beat that price, and I've even seen it a bit lower than
that price! I can easily drink 2-plus gallons of milk a week!

When I make my home-made morning 'mocha', it's a combination of 2%-milk
with a hefty dose of heavy whipping cream included, along with a wee bit
of sugar. The mixture gets nuked in the mug, then cocoa powder and
instant coffee are added to the hot dairy mixture. Hey, this is a lot
less expensive than buying any 'starbucks' (etc.) whatever G! Works
for me - and that's what ultimately counts. Oh, oh - a quart of heavy
whipping cream at Ruler is only ~$3.59 vs. nearly ~$7/quart at other
local grocery stores - yikes!

We go through about 5 gallons of whole milk a week. All this talk of
milk inspired me to have a big bowl of raisin bran.

Sky


--Bryan


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