General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 12:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,987
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Oct 10, 3:41*pm, Bob Terwilliger
wrote:
I've contended in the past that some foods are better when prepared at
home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.

On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)

Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
hotter than what you can get at home.

What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
better to order in a restaurant?

Bob


On the whole, I think that homemade by a decent cook tops most resto
fare. The only reason we eat out is because I'm tired and/or have not
the ingreeds I need for something and don't feel like shopping.
Besides, I've cooked thousands of meals and deserve a break.

Better to order in a resto: lobster Fisherman style and other
elaborate entrees.

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 12:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 508
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

sf wrote:

On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:19:45 -0700, "JL" wrote:


I don't eat at exotic restaurants, and i choose restaurants with menus i
can understand. Where i have some idea what i order is. Often times
ordering a "chicken fried steak" if its on the menu, but since moving to
California i have been so consistently disappointed i had to learn to
make it myself.



I ordered chicken fried steak for the first time to see what that's
all about. It was good, but it's not good enough to want to make it
at home... or to even order it again, but my curiosity was satisfied.



Don't even get me started on "country fried steak"!!!

What i don't understand is why Oregon roadside dinners make such a good
version?

I think it should be batter diped not egged & bread crumbed or floured
and frying with lard is as important as the chicken gravy.
--
JL
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 12:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,796
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:12:10 -0700 (PDT), Kalmia
wrote:

On the whole, I think that homemade by a decent cook tops most resto
fare. The only reason we eat out is because I'm tired and/or have not
the ingreeds I need for something and don't feel like shopping.
Besides, I've cooked thousands of meals and deserve a break.

Better to order in a resto: lobster Fisherman style and other
elaborate entrees.


Sometimes, I just want a hamburger.... a $10 burger, but it's still
ground beef.
--

Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
T.S. Eliot
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 12:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 4,387
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Oct 10, 12:41*pm, Bob Terwilliger
wrote:
I've contended in the past that some foods are better when prepared at
home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.

On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)

Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
hotter than what you can get at home.

What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
better to order in a restaurant?

Bob


Our local Chinese rest (Harbor Monsoon) is one of the only ones I will
go to- we get family style, so there are 4-5 dishes. Too many
ingredients and prep time for me to want to bother with, plus their
food is really good.
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 12:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,796
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:26:12 -0700, "M. JL Esq."
wrote:

I think it should be batter diped not egged & bread crumbed or floured
and frying with lard is as important as the chicken gravy.
--


What I ordered was battered and fried well, I just don't "get" chicken
fried beef. I prefer chicken fried chicken and can hardly wait to get
back to the restaurant where I had that delicious chicken & waffles.
--

Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
T.S. Eliot


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 12:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 45,420
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?


"Pico Rico" wrote in message
...

Someone once told me
that a sandwich always tastes better when someone else makes it. I think
this is true.



you must have missed that Dr. Phil episode, where he was telling the
husband that he should go out of his way to make his wife feel loved, and
then sided with her when she told the husband to "make his own damn
sandwich" since she couldn't be bothered to learn how to make a better
sandwich.


I can't stand Dr. Phil.


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 01:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,122
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Pico Rico" wrote in message
...

Someone once told me
that a sandwich always tastes better when someone else makes it. I
think this is true.



you must have missed that Dr. Phil episode, where he was telling the
husband that he should go out of his way to make his wife feel loved, and
then sided with her when she told the husband to "make his own damn
sandwich" since she couldn't be bothered to learn how to make a better
sandwich.


I can't stand Dr. Phil.


and he doesn't know much about making a good sandwich, either.


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 01:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,796
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:52:06 -0700 (PDT), Helpful person
wrote:

Many restaurants now cook their steaks sous vide and finish them off
on the grill. This gives consistent results every time.


Please don't mention sous vide, the thought turns my stomach. I avoid
anything on a menu that admits being sous vide and sincerely hope they
aren't lying about the rest of the menu.
--

Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
T.S. Eliot
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 02:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,198
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?


"merryb" wrote in message
...
On Oct 10, 12:41 pm, Bob Terwilliger
wrote:
I've contended in the past that some foods are better when prepared at
home than when you get them in a restaurant. Risotto is an example
I've cited in particular, because restaurants take shortcuts which
detract from the quality of the risotto. Paella is a similar story,
and it pains me to note that many restaurants don't even bother to use
anything *close* to the right kind of rice for paella, assuming that
their customers are too ignorant to recognize the difference.

On the other hand, bouillabaise would be better in a restaurant,
because in order to make a "proper" bouillabaise you need to make
enough for more than a dozen people. (Well, maybe it would be
practical for Ranee to make at *her* home, but not for most of us.)

Grilled steak is a tossup: If you're in charge of cooking your own
steak, you can make it *exactly* the way you want it, but that's
balanced by the fact that restaurants often can get a better quality
of meat than what is available to consumers, and in many cases
restaurants have equipment which can create a heating surface much
hotter than what you can get at home.

What do you think are other foods which are better at home? What is
better to order in a restaurant?

Bob


Our local Chinese rest (Harbor Monsoon) is one of the only ones I will
go to- we get family style, so there are 4-5 dishes. Too many
ingredients and prep time for me to want to bother with, plus their
food is really good.

Seafood as an answer on both sides. My gumbo is lots grander than any
restaurant ever serves. Lots. OTOH, I like to order a seafood platter when
we're out. They have access to fresh seafood and they deal with the prep
and clean-up. I've learned to bypass their notion of tartar sauce to go
with. That concoction is fragile, spoils easily and is rarely safely
maintained. IMHO of course. Polly

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 04:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,796
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 22:21:32 +0000, Isaac Gish
wrote:


Ah, i totally agree. Food cooked at home is usually amazing if done
right. Of course fast food isn't meant for quality, and even at many
restaurants they have ways to get the more for their buck my giving us
food that isn't the best quality. Plus, when you cook your own food, you
decide the ingredients, and you get a sense of accomplishment when it's
done.


Yeah, but I like to eat out.... because I'd rather not cook that
night.
--

Never commit yourself to a cheese without having first examined it.
T.S. Eliot


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 02:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,546
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

"Julie Bove" wrote:

In most cases I have found that the food is not better in a restaurant at
all. I've never been able to make a good grilled cheese or tuna melt at
home. And really I hate making sandwiches at all. Someone once told me
that a sandwich always tastes better when someone else makes it. I think
this is true.


You haven't tried when I make you a sandwich.
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 03:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 32,588
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?


I can't speak for risotto as it's not one of my favorites, however I
take issue with Bouillabaisse. I make my own fish stock and have
never had anything that comes close at a restaurant.


I don't usually order what I make with any regularity at home either,
but I would order bouillabaisse because I don't make it at home. Same
with paella (although I haven't had a restaurant version that I like
yet) and risotto... I love most of the restaurant versions I've had.


I was never much of a fish eater because my mother, who was a pretty
good cook, did not do fish well. Besides, we lived a long way from the
ocean and did not have the access to good fish that we have now. I
used to order fish in restaurants. Not fish and chips or fish sticks,
but whatever the fish or seafood choice was in nice restaurants. I
discovered all sorts of interesting ways to have fish and started
cooking it at home.

We don't go out for dinner as often as we used to, but I still tend to
have things that I don't get at home. For instance, my wife does not eat
potatoes, so when we go to one of the local restaurants I often have
Shepherds pie, and she has liver.
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 03:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 32,588
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On 10/10/2011 6:13 PM, Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:

you must have missed that Dr. Phil episode, where he was telling the husband
that he should go out of his way to make his wife feel loved, and then sided
with her when she told the husband to "make his own damn sandwich" since she
couldn't be bothered to learn how to make a better sandwich.


Is this what people's marital problems really are? For crying out
loud! Make a nice sandwich for your husband and say thank you for the
sandwich made for you, is it really that difficult?



I had a job for about 10 years where I was on the road half the time,
and if I was away from the shop my meals were covered by my expense
account, so I ate in restaurants. If I was stuck at the shop I at the
brown bag special. One thing I had to learn to do was to throw out the
sandwich my wife had made. Apparently she resented making sandwiches for
me if I was not eating them.
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 03:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 32,588
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

On 10/10/2011 6:16 PM, Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:

At first I couldn't think of dishes that were actually better in a
restaurant, but now that I've thought a little, I think those things
which require hard to acquire or store or install equipment. So,
tandoori, since I don't have a tandoor oven. Although I make a
delicious faux gyro, making it without the spit is a challenge.


My faux gyro experiments have been better than some of my recent Gyros
experiences. I used to love those things but over the last few years I
have been disappointed so many times. I think the worst was a year or so
ago when my wife went by bicycle to an event in another city. I was
yearning for a gyros and knew there would be food kiosks that offered
them. When I got my gyros I was never so disappointed in my life. Then
last summer I went to the local Greek run greasy spoon and ordered a
gyros. Three thin strips of meat and a thick crumbly pita. It was a
major disappointment.

Thank goodness I have since discovered a good middle eastern restaurant.
I learned from it that hummus can be really good. I have had their
kebabs. Maybe I should try a gyros there.
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-10-2011, 04:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 12
Default Better at home? Better at restaurant?

sf wrote:

On Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:26:12 -0700, "M. JL Esq."
wrote:


I think it should be batter diped not egged & bread crumbed or floured
and frying with lard is as important as the chicken gravy.
--



What I ordered was battered and fried well, I just don't "get" chicken
fried beef. I prefer chicken fried chicken and can hardly wait to get
back to the restaurant where I had that delicious chicken & waffles.



Its comfort food for me. A childhood favourite that was only ever eaten
at a restaurant.

And those being more the "roadside dinner" sort of rural Oregon than
anything else.

While i think there is some thing to be said for the use of commercial,
instant, powdered or canned chicken gravy's with the steak, mashed
potatoes & green beans i do prefer a more home made gravy using real
schmaltz to make the gravy as well as lard to fry the steak. And the
seasoning of the batter is important also, i prefer it with a good
amount of both paprika and black pepper.

I use, primarily for convenience, shoulder of beef, i cut into thin
slices and than pound thin with a meat mallet.

In my experience the so called 'minute steaks" are not done to my
satisfaction in the minute it actually take to cook them.

A chicken fried steak should be very tender, fork tender, and a quick
cooking of the machine tenderized "minute steaks" do not achieve this
imo. Baking them, covered in the oven for another half hour or so after
frying them helps but i prefer to tenderize the slice of shoulder with
the meat mallet which then cooks up very tender.

Im also very fond of chicken breast cooked in a beef & red wine gravy.

But have yet to see it on a menu
--
JL


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FS: WEBER'S NEW AMERICAN BARBECUE Home Grillers and Restaurant Chefstrying new recipes by JAMIE PURVIANCE 44%off! [email protected] Barbecue 0 10-11-2016 12:22 PM
Make restaurant recipes at home!(personal favorite) Ashley Lipinski Recipes 0 24-08-2012 06:54 PM
Do you like recreating restaurant food at home? [email protected] General Cooking 0 12-10-2007 11:28 PM
restaurant style iced-tea (home results dont come close) Sanjay Punjab Tea 5 24-11-2003 07:07 PM
restaurant style iced-tea (home results dont come close) Sanjay Punjab General 5 24-11-2003 07:07 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2020 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017