General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-11-2009, 07:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 362
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me about yourgrinder.....

We have a Champion juicer and I was hoping there was an attachment for
the strong motor it has, but they don't make one.
Please tell me about what you have and why you like it.
Thanks, Nan

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-11-2009, 08:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,557
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyour grinder.....

Nan wrote:

We have a Champion juicer and I was hoping there was an attachment for
the strong motor it has, but they don't make one.
Please tell me about what you have and why you like it.
Thanks, Nan




I have an old Chop-Rite #10 that I bought 30 years ago (clamps on the
edge of a table), and a few years ago I bought an electric #12 from
Northern Hydraulic, now called Northern Tool. I think this is the
same model:
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...70_36989_36989

I like it because it takes the same plates as my old Chop-Rite, and it
has a large feed tube so I can cut the meat into quite large strips
and it will handle it. It will grind up a whole brisket in just a few
minutes.

I would not get anything smaller than a heavy-duty #8 grinder.

Bob
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-11-2009, 08:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 5,847
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyourgrinder.....


zxcvbob wrote:

Nan wrote:

We have a Champion juicer and I was hoping there was an attachment for
the strong motor it has, but they don't make one.
Please tell me about what you have and why you like it.
Thanks, Nan


I have an old Chop-Rite #10 that I bought 30 years ago (clamps on the
edge of a table), and a few years ago I bought an electric #12 from
Northern Hydraulic, now called Northern Tool. I think this is the
same model:
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...70_36989_36989

I like it because it takes the same plates as my old Chop-Rite, and it
has a large feed tube so I can cut the meat into quite large strips
and it will handle it. It will grind up a whole brisket in just a few
minutes.

I would not get anything smaller than a heavy-duty #8 grinder.

Bob


If you have a Kitchenaid stand mixer (or compatible like Hobart N-50),
the grinder attachment works well. I wouldn't try to use it to process a
huge amount of meat at one time, but it does just fine for up to say 6#
of meat at a time which would certainly cover most normal meals. I also
find that it only takes a few minutes to tear down and wash once you've
done it a few times.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-11-2009, 09:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,055
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me about yourgrinder.....

Nan wrote:

We have a Champion juicer and I was hoping there was an attachment for
the strong motor it has, but they don't make one.
Please tell me about what you have and why you like it.
Thanks, Nan


There used to be a meat grinder attachment for the
Champion, and you can still find them now and then on
eBay. However, it has no reduction gear. I think the
Champion motor spins way too fast for grinding meat
without a reduction gear.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-11-2009, 09:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 6
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyourgrinder.....

I have a KitchenAid stand mixer and the meat grinder accessory. Also
the sausage stuffer, a nice add-on. The mixer gets very frequent
use. The meat grinder gets less frequent but regular use. We don't
use ground meat often, but when we do use it almost always we grind it
ourselves. Far higher quality, lower cost, and full control over fat
content etc. The sausage stuffer is really neat, and home made
sausages are so delicious.

The meat grinder accessory is very easy to clean. Some gristle may
have to be pulled off the spindle by hand, but then all the parts can
go in the dishwasher. It is easy to wash by hand too.

If you process more than 10 pounds at one time, try to find a local
meat packer and have them do it for you. Know any hunters? They'll
know who the local packers are.

Pologirl






  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-11-2009, 10:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 43
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyour grinder.....



Nan wrote:
We have a Champion juicer and I was hoping there was an attachment for
the strong motor it has, but they don't make one.
Please tell me about what you have and why you like it.
Thanks, Nan


We use an Oster Electric Meat Grinder. When our local market has beef on
sale (in a cryovac package), usually 25 pound packages I will buy one.
I cut it up into a few 3 pound roasts and then grind the rest for
burgers, meatloaf, meatballs, etc. When I do meat loaf I throw
everything in the grinder, bread, onion, spices. It is a great meat
grinder. Save about 50% off buying this way.

We lent the grinder to a neighbor who wanted to grind up his deer meat.
Deer meat was too much for the grinder, he broke it. The gears inside
are plastic and they broke. I was going to get the parts and repair,
but I luckily found another grinder at a yard sale. I don't lend it out
anymore....
--
Skype fxdlrider2
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-11-2009, 11:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18,833
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyour grinder.....

Pologirl wrote:

I have a KitchenAid stand mixer and the meat grinder accessory. Also
the sausage stuffer, a nice add-on. The mixer gets very frequent
use. The meat grinder gets less frequent but regular use. We don't
use ground meat often, but when we do use it almost always we grind it
ourselves. Far higher quality, lower cost, and full control over fat
content etc. The sausage stuffer is really neat, and home made
sausages are so delicious.

The meat grinder accessory is very easy to clean. Some gristle may
have to be pulled off the spindle by hand, but then all the parts can
go in the dishwasher. It is easy to wash by hand too.

If you process more than 10 pounds at one time, try to find a local
meat packer and have them do it for you. Know any hunters? They'll
know who the local packers are.

Pologirl


Wrong answer... if you have more meat than your teeny grinder can
handle thats all the more reason to own a larger grinder of your own,
the larger the quantity of meat the more reason to own ones own
grinder. Having someone else grind your meat regardless of quantity
is never a solution... then you're back where you started from,
mystery meat, only worse because now instead of having a tiny bit of
mystery meat you have a whole boatload of mystery meat. With all your
talk about cleaning your grinder then what is the point of someone
else grinding your meat with their schmutzic grinder. That's the main
purpose of owning ones own grinder, so that they know with absolute
certainty that all aspects of grinding are done clean.

I hope no one will be running out to buy one of those tiny cheapo
attachment grinders, they are so small that most folks will continue
to buy pregrond mystery meat because it's just too much trouble to
grind meat with the toys r us thingie, plus they don't produce a very
good grind anyway, they produce mostly smeared meat... mostly what
they do is take a nice piece of pricy meat and turn it into pet food,
clean pet food but pet food never the less.

Anyone contemplating buying a meat grinder I strongly suggest buying
the largest best quality grinder they can afford that is suitable for
the home cook... if you can't afford your dream grinder right now then
save your pennies until you can, you won't be sorry. The Waring Pro
from Cabelas is an excellent buy, for home use anything with greater
capacity is over engineered... if you can afford $500 for a grinder
and your ego feels neglected then go for it but you really don't need
a commercial grinder for home use... would be like buying a 38DD bra
when you really wear a 36C.


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 02:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me about yourgrinder.....



Nan wrote:

We have a Champion juicer and I was hoping there was an attachment for
the strong motor it has, but they don't make one.
Please tell me about what you have and why you like it.
Thanks, Nan


We have two:

The grinder attachment for the KA. Works well and fairly easy to clean.

A hand-cranked cast iron version brought over from Holland. Also works
well and easy to clean. Heavy as all get-out though LOL.
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 02:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 475
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me about yourgrinder.....

On Nov 2, 12:08*pm, Nan wrote:
We have a Champion juicer and I was hoping there was an attachment for
the strong motor it has, but they don't make one.
Please tell me about what you have and why you like it.


I bought one off ebay for about $20. It's fine, except that the
suction cup isn't perfect. I have used my Cuisinart to chop meat, but
it was more like pulverized, like Taco Bell taco meat. I still
happily use store ground beef, especially when I'm cooking it well
done. I tell you a fun thing to do. Use a strip steak that's an inch
and a half. Trim it a bit and pepper the remaining fat, and the meat
next to the bone. Seriously sear it over a wood fire on a Weber
Kettle, then cap the kettle to smoke, leaving it blue rare. Grind and
serve on a platter with the bones behind the ground meat, and stale
toasted Italian bread pieces. I'd have a few shakers with fine ground
salt available.

Thanks, Nan


--Bryan
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 03:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 6
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyourgrinder.....

On Nov 2, 3:32*pm, brooklyn1 wrote:
Wrong answer... if you have more meat than your teeny grinder can
handle thats all the *more reason to own a larger grinder of your own,
the larger the quantity of meat the more reason to own ones own
grinder.


Depends how many times a year you use it, and how much you want to
spend on a grinder and a freezer etc. Some meat packers are
immaculate. I will buy ground meat from some supermarkets, not from
others. My local supermarket is not one of them. These days real
butcher shops are few and far between.

Pologirl


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 03:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 18,833
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyour grinder.....

Pologirl writes:
brooklyn1 wrote:
Wrong answer... if you have more meat than your teeny grinder can
handle thats all the *more reason to own a larger grinder of your own,
the larger the quantity of meat the more reason to own ones own
grinder.


Depends how many times a year you use it, and how much you want to
spend on a grinder and a freezer etc. Some meat packers are
immaculate. I will buy ground meat from some supermarkets, not from
others. My local supermarket is not one of them. These days real
butcher shops are few and far between.

Cop out alert!

Uncanny how I can always pick out the cheapo ******* back pedaling
phonys who own no kind of grinder but like to pretend they do just so
they can have something to say in a thread.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 06:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 6
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyourgrinder.....

On Nov 2, 7:55*pm, brooklyn1 wrote:
Uncanny how I can always pick out the cheapo ******* back pedaling
phonys who own no kind of grinder but like to pretend they do just so
they can have something to say in a thread.


I had ground elk steak Russian style for dinner a couple nights ago.
Mmm... The meat was a gift from the hunter, ground and packed in 1
pound units by a local packer. Neener neener.

Pologirl
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 09:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,154
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyour grinder.....


"Pologirl" wrote in message
...
On Nov 2, 3:32 pm, brooklyn1 wrote:
Wrong answer... if you have more meat than your teeny grinder can
handle thats all the more reason to own a larger grinder of your own,
the larger the quantity of meat the more reason to own ones own
grinder.


Depends how many times a year you use it, and how much you want to
spend on a grinder and a freezer etc. Some meat packers are
immaculate. I will buy ground meat from some supermarkets, not from
others. My local supermarket is not one of them. These days real
butcher shops are few and far between.


I am only cooking for two of us now, but I still like to grind my meat
freshly when I want to use it. I prefer to do it myself for many reasons
which I am sure you already know if you are interested in grinders and read
here.

Mine can be seen here. I took these pics during the Hamburger thread:
http://tinypic.com/a/ziqb/2


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 03:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 5,847
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyourgrinder.....


Ophelia wrote:

"Pologirl" wrote in message
...
On Nov 2, 3:32 pm, brooklyn1 wrote:
Wrong answer... if you have more meat than your teeny grinder can
handle thats all the more reason to own a larger grinder of your own,
the larger the quantity of meat the more reason to own ones own
grinder.


Depends how many times a year you use it, and how much you want to
spend on a grinder and a freezer etc. Some meat packers are
immaculate. I will buy ground meat from some supermarkets, not from
others. My local supermarket is not one of them. These days real
butcher shops are few and far between.

I am only cooking for two of us now, but I still like to grind my meat
freshly when I want to use it. I prefer to do it myself for many reasons
which I am sure you already know if you are interested in grinders and read
here.

Mine can be seen here. I took these pics during the Hamburger thread:
http://tinypic.com/a/ziqb/2


For grinding meat for individual meals for a few servings or less, the
smaller grinders like the Kitchenaid attachment are better suited to the
task.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-11-2009, 03:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 5,847
Default OK, I'm convinced I need to grind my own meat, tell me aboutyourgrinder.....


Ophelia wrote:

"Pologirl" wrote in message
...
On Nov 2, 3:32 pm, brooklyn1 wrote:
Wrong answer... if you have more meat than your teeny grinder can
handle thats all the more reason to own a larger grinder of your own,
the larger the quantity of meat the more reason to own ones own
grinder.


Depends how many times a year you use it, and how much you want to
spend on a grinder and a freezer etc. Some meat packers are
immaculate. I will buy ground meat from some supermarkets, not from
others. My local supermarket is not one of them. These days real
butcher shops are few and far between.

I am only cooking for two of us now, but I still like to grind my meat
freshly when I want to use it. I prefer to do it myself for many reasons
which I am sure you already know if you are interested in grinders and read
here.

Mine can be seen here. I took these pics during the Hamburger thread:
http://tinypic.com/a/ziqb/2


When cooking for a few servings, the smaller grinders like the
Kitchenaid attachment are better suited to the task. Indeed grinding and
storing large batches of meat at home pretty much defeats the purposes
of home grinding - to eliminate the off taste from oxidation and to
eliminate contamination issues. If you want to buy large portions of
cheap meat to freeze, freeze them in whole primal cuts and only grind
them when you are ready to use them.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Another reason to grind your own meat Jerry Avins General Cooking 0 08-03-2012 06:35 PM
Using a food processor to grind meat. Handy Gandy General Cooking 8 14-09-2010 05:24 PM
Okay All You Meat Grinding Folks... what to grind first? jmcquown[_2_] General Cooking 73 27-07-2010 05:03 PM
finally convinced my hubby Evelyn Diabetic 14 01-02-2009 03:21 PM
Course Grind meat for chili... Dannyl General Cooking 37 22-05-2007 08:01 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:11 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017