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Old 18-05-2004, 09:47 PM
NorMinn
 
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Default Ceramic (glass) cooktops--Which pots can be used?



Lew wrote:
Thank you all for sharing your knowledge and experience on glass
cooktops. They look really great, but they seem to have quite a few
more problems and precautions than do the (ugly old) bare coil
elements, and, especially, gas. It seems that we could adjust our
cooking procedures to the glass cooktop, but I'm calling a plumber to
find out how much a gas supply line to the kitchen will cost. (We have
natural gas heat and hot water.)

You've given us much to chew over before we make our final plan.

Thanks again.

Lew


I'm sure there are those who love solid surface cooktops, but I'm not
one. When my Club aluminum wore out, I bought an inexpensive set of
anodyzed alum. cookware. I love it. It uses less heat and nothing
sticks (I didn't get the "non-stick" coating).


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Old 19-05-2004, 03:44 PM
Lew
 
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Default Ceramic (glass) cooktops--Which pots can be used?

pltrgyst wrote in message . ..
On 18 May 2004 06:36:42 -0700, (Lew) wrote:

Thank you all for sharing your knowledge and experience on glass
cooktops. They look really great, but they seem to have quite a few
more problems and precautions than do the (ugly old) bare coil
elements, and, especially, gas. It seems that we could adjust our
cooking procedures to the glass cooktop, but I'm calling a plumber to
find out how much a gas supply line to the kitchen will cost. (We have
natural gas heat and hot water.)


The look is a minor consideration comapared to the smoothtop's performance
advantages. There is no need to adapt your cooking procedures if you're coming
from electric cooktops, except to adjust for quicker response when you change
the heat setting.

And you may find, as some of us have, that despite its still quicker response,
gas is a disappointment, and is not worthwhile. We had the opportunity to have
gas run in last year as part of a group in our townhouses, and declined.

-- Larry


My plumber looked over our kitchen situation yesterday, and even
though the distance from the gas line to the kitchen (above) is only
about 15 feet, his estimate to install gas is $700-900. This includes
getting several permits and inspections. I'll admit the the
installation is a bit tricky since there is no direct access via
straight pipe, and a flexible pipe has to be "snaked" and secured
above a false ceiling. But at that cost I can even replace a damaged
cooktop a couple of times ;-).

So, we'll have the adventure of trying the handsome glass cooktop!

Lew
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Old 22-05-2004, 01:23 AM
Mary Shafer
 
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Default Ceramic (glass) cooktops--Which pots can be used?

On 18 May 2004 06:36:42 -0700, (Lew) wrote:

Thank you all for sharing your knowledge and experience on glass
cooktops. They look really great, but they seem to have quite a few
more problems and precautions than do the (ugly old) bare coil
elements, and, especially, gas. It seems that we could adjust our
cooking procedures to the glass cooktop, but I'm calling a plumber to
find out how much a gas supply line to the kitchen will cost. (We have
natural gas heat and hot water.)


I really prefer gas, because you can look at the flame and know
whether it's right or not. Plus, any change you make is almost
instant. I find cooking on electric burners very frustrating, but I'm
assured by those who have changed over that it can be learned fairly
quickly.

If you decide to get a gas cooktop, be sure to consider the ones that
have different sized burners. The cooktop in my new house, a 36-in.
gas GE cooktop with five burners, has three burner sizes. These are
simmer (small), regular, and extra hot (large). I haven't unpacked
the manual, so I can't tell you the BTUs of each, but I can tell you
the large burner boils water for pasta very quickly and the small
burners do a good job simmering the sauce.

There's one really annoying thing about the GE, though. It has the
piezo pilot lights and the dial positions for using them are marked
"LITE", not "LIGHT". This peeves me every time I see it, as I think
it cheapens my cooktop.

Mary

--
Mary Shafer Retired aerospace research engineer

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Old 22-05-2004, 01:44 AM
Jim Yanik
 
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Default Ceramic (glass) cooktops--Which pots can be used?

Mary Shafer wrote in
:

On 18 May 2004 06:36:42 -0700, (Lew) wrote:

Thank you all for sharing your knowledge and experience on glass
cooktops. They look really great, but they seem to have quite a few
more problems and precautions than do the (ugly old) bare coil
elements, and, especially, gas. It seems that we could adjust our
cooking procedures to the glass cooktop, but I'm calling a plumber to
find out how much a gas supply line to the kitchen will cost. (We have
natural gas heat and hot water.)


I really prefer gas, because you can look at the flame and know
whether it's right or not. Plus, any change you make is almost
instant. I find cooking on electric burners very frustrating, but I'm
assured by those who have changed over that it can be learned fairly
quickly.

If you decide to get a gas cooktop, be sure to consider the ones that
have different sized burners. The cooktop in my new house, a 36-in.
gas GE cooktop with five burners, has three burner sizes. These are
simmer (small), regular, and extra hot (large). I haven't unpacked
the manual, so I can't tell you the BTUs of each, but I can tell you
the large burner boils water for pasta very quickly and the small
burners do a good job simmering the sauce.

There's one really annoying thing about the GE, though. It has the
piezo pilot lights and the dial positions for using them are marked
"LITE", not "LIGHT". This peeves me every time I see it, as I think
it cheapens my cooktop.

Mary


I wonder why they don't make a gas cooktop with burners that have more than
one burner ring? If you had a couple of burners with 2-3 progressively
larger concentric burner rings,you could have more flexibility as to size
of pot that can be used on each position.Probably cost,although I think for
a premium stove,the extra cost would not be that great.

Comments welcome,but be nice. :-)

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik-at-kua.net
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Old 22-05-2004, 06:42 PM
JWC
 
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Default Ceramic (glass) cooktops--Which pots can be used?

On Sat, 22 May 2004 00:44:38 +0000 (UTC), Jim Yanik
wrote:




I wonder why they don't make a gas cooktop with burners that have more than
one burner ring? If you had a couple of burners with 2-3 progressively
larger concentric burner rings,you could have more flexibility as to size
of pot that can be used on each position.Probably cost,although I think for
a premium stove,the extra cost would not be that great.

Comments welcome,but be nice. :-)


We have a 3 year old Maytag with 5 burner rings, Four are regular and
on is a warmer. One burner, front left, does have dual rings. While
I have no specific evidence, we believe that when the burner is set
to "Large" the inner burner does not get as hot as the outer one.


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Old 14-08-2018, 05:14 PM posted to rec.food.equipment,rec.food.cooking,alt.home.repair
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 2
Default Ceramic (glass) cooktops--Which pots can be used?

replying to NorMinn, Gigi Miller wrote:
Did you use your Club Aluminum on the glass top? I've been reading that the
cookware should not have ridges on the bottom. I get conflicting info- some
say thick aluminum is safe, while others say avoid aluminum. What's a girl to
do?

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/mainte...ed-524755-.htm




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