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Old 12-12-2008, 04:28 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 23:26:29 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

.... The oven self clean cycle is
way too high for seasoning, it will burn the oil right off.


Agreed.


But that is what he wants to do, remove it.


That's what the OP wanted to do. This digression was in response to JT's
suggestion of re-seasoning by oiling and running through a cleaning cycle twice.

-- Larry

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Old 12-12-2008, 04:55 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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In article ,
Sky wrote:

The problem is, the seasoning is quite grody, so I need to re-season
this puppy. What's the best way to remove the current seasoning?


Easy off oven cleaner and sunlight. That'll de-season any pan. g

Should I use the clean feature of my oven with the DO inside? What
other methods are there? Right now, it's really greasy & sticky as all
get out; even the lid is sticky. TIA.

Sky

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Old 12-12-2008, 05:19 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

Omelet wrote:

In article ,
Sky wrote:

The problem is, the seasoning is quite grody, so I need to re-season
this puppy. What's the best way to remove the current seasoning?


Easy off oven cleaner and sunlight. That'll de-season any pan. g

Should I use the clean feature of my oven with the DO inside? What
other methods are there? Right now, it's really greasy & sticky as all
get out; even the lid is sticky. TIA.

Sky

--
Peace! Om


OH, I really, really like this idea! That's definitely a lot easier
than a lot of 'elbow grease.' Thanks ever so much for the suggestion to
use EasyOff, and thanks to all who've responded ;D

Sky, who wishes everyone a Happy Holiday


--
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Old 12-12-2008, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron


"Sky" wrote in message
...
X-posted with followups set to rec.food.equipment

Well, I scored a cast iron Lodge dutch oven at the cost of only $5! The
dutch oven has "8 D O" marked on its bottom.

The problem is, the seasoning is quite grody, so I need to re-season
this puppy. What's the best way to remove the current seasoning?
Should I use the clean feature of my oven with the DO inside? What
other methods are there? Right now, it's really greasy & sticky as all
get out; even the lid is sticky. TIA.

Sky



Put the pan in either a fireplace and light a wood fire, placing the pan on
top of the fire - come back the next morning when cool or put the pan in a
self cleaning oven and run the oven through its cycle.

These are the quickest ways.

Dimitri

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Old 12-12-2008, 08:54 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 11:19:46 -0600, Sky wrote:

Easy off oven cleaner and sunlight. That'll de-season any pan. g


OH, I really, really like this idea! That's definitely a lot easier
than a lot of 'elbow grease.' Thanks ever so much for the suggestion to
use EasyOff...


Be careful with the EasyOff, even using a sealed bag. And afterward, you'll
still have to run it through a self-cleaning cycle, or scrub and soap it like
crazy, to get rid of the vestiges of chemicals on [and in] the inside of your
[now porous] pan.

If I had access to a self-cleaning oven, I wouldn't even think of using the
EasyOff method. YMMV, of course.

-- Larry


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Old 13-12-2008, 05:38 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 15:02:16 -0800, The Wolf wrote:

Steel wool and liquid detergent.

Coat with vegetable oil using a paper towel.


What does the paper towel do? I use my fingers.

Put in pre-heated oven at 100 degrees for two hours.


Oh, now we're making tea, are we? 8

IMO, more like 325 deg F for three to four hours, then turn the oven off and let
the pan cool within the oven.

-- Larry
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Old 13-12-2008, 07:40 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
Sky Sky is offline
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Henry Q. Bibb wrote:

In article ,
AtM says...
X-posted with followups set to rec.food.equipment

Well, I scored a cast iron Lodge dutch oven at the cost of only $5! The
dutch oven has "8 D O" marked on its bottom.

The problem is, the seasoning is quite grody, so I need to re-season
this puppy. What's the best way to remove the current seasoning?
Should I use the clean feature of my oven with the DO inside? What
other methods are there? Right now, it's really greasy & sticky as all
get out; even the lid is sticky. TIA.

Sky


Here's what Lodge says to do:
http://www.lodgemfg.com/use-care-sea...ast-iron.asp#3


OOOPS! Now why didn't I think to reference the Lodge website!!! DOH!
I do know how to season cast iron, but the thing is, I want to remove
the really sticky and grody seasoning that's already on the dutch oven
-- it's really very nasty indeed.

Again, thanks for all the suggestions and recommendations, folks. I
found them very helpful.

Sky

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Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
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Old 13-12-2008, 09:25 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 18:46:27 -0600, Sky
wrote:

X-posted with followups set to rec.food.equipment

Well, I scored a cast iron Lodge dutch oven at the cost of only $5! The
dutch oven has "8 D O" marked on its bottom.

The problem is, the seasoning is quite grody, so I need to re-season
this puppy. What's the best way to remove the current seasoning?
Should I use the clean feature of my oven with the DO inside? What
other methods are there? Right now, it's really greasy & sticky as all
get out; even the lid is sticky. TIA.

Sky


Use lard or bacon grease for the reseasoning or it'll be sticky again


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Old 14-12-2008, 12:49 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

On Fri, 12 Dec 2008 08:28:55 -0600, Terry
wrote:

On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 18:46:27 -0600, Sky
wrote:

X-posted with followups set to rec.food.equipment

Well, I scored a cast iron Lodge dutch oven at the cost of only $5! The
dutch oven has "8 D O" marked on its bottom.

The problem is, the seasoning is quite grody, so I need to re-season
this puppy. What's the best way to remove the current seasoning?
Should I use the clean feature of my oven with the DO inside? What
other methods are there? Right now, it's really greasy & sticky as all
get out; even the lid is sticky. TIA.

Sky


Hi Sky,

There was a thread on rec.crafts.metalworking on this subject.

faulty memory engaged; not responsible for errors

Metalworker showed young nephew how to use cup-type wire brush to make
things nice and shiny. Left nephew alone for a while. Nephew proudly
brings granny's 50-year-old cast-iron skillet to show uncle. Skillet
is now beautifully shiny... :-(

That being said, since the skillet is sticky, other measures are
likely to be necessary. Wire brushes don't like 'sticky'.

Best -- Terry


Howdy,

I know that I am touching on religious matters, but...

Several years ago, Consumer Reports did a piece on cast iron
cookware.

Among other things, they tested a number of "Grandma's 75
year old perfectly seasoned so everything slides right off
it" pieces against brand new stock.

They could not tell the difference, and neither can I.

In my experience, if the temperature is right, things tend
not to stick.

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 14-12-2008, 04:34 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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"Bobo" wrote in message

Use lard or bacon grease for the reseasoning or it'll be sticky again



Never did the oven seasoning thing. I like to fry a pound of bacon to
season a CI pan.


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Old 15-12-2008, 05:05 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 16:56:12 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:

Sky wrote:

Well, I scored a cast iron Lodge dutch oven at the cost of only $5! The
dutch oven has "8 D O" marked on its bottom.

The problem is, the seasoning is quite grody, so I need to re-season
this puppy. What's the best way to remove the current seasoning?
Should I use the clean feature of my oven with the DO inside? What
other methods are there? Right now, it's really greasy & sticky as all
get out; even the lid is sticky. TIA.


Been there, done that. Found the easiest way is to break out the
old cordless drill. Go to Home Depot and buy an inexpensive
steel brush set for it. They typically come with a roundish one
that looks like a vegetable scrubber and one or two wire sheel
bushes in the 2 or 3 inch sizes.

Wear leather gloves. Your brushes WILL jump now and then
and those wire bristles can cut.

Take your iron stuff out to the patio and start brushing, going
right down to bright metal. If the metal is also pitted, you can
switch to a small sanding disk and grind a little more seriously.
This makes a difference if the pitting is on the bottom inside
of the pot (for more even browning later and for discouraging
further damage to the metal).

Bails can be polisihed with a little fine grit sandpaper.

If you want to play with it , you can throw in some sharp
sand and brush with that inside the pot. It might speed
things up a little.

Then go through the usual seasoning process with whatever
oil suits your fancy (I use bacon drippings), maybe on your
BBQ grill. I use a Kamodo and take it up to 450-550 degrees.
Smokes a lot, but does a good job. May take more than one
pass to get the job done... YMMV.

HTH

Alex
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Old 15-12-2008, 05:11 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 23:26:29 -0500, "Ed Pawlowski"
wrote:


"pltrgyst" wrote in message
.. .
On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 21:26:01 -0500, Moka Java
wrote:

Pre-seasoned Lodge cast iron is available at bargain prices on Amazon....


Does anyone like this stuff? Plus they don't seem to make anything with a
smooth
bottom anymore, so their current products are worthless for glass cooktops
and
induction hobs.


Wagnerware is available again. Do a Google search to find it. IMO, it is a
much better finish.


Beware cast iron bearing the Heuck Classic brand on the bottom.
Chinese made, I think, and QC is spotty. Bottoms may not be level,
which is a constant annoyance even on a gas stove. Test for flat
bottom at the store. If it's OK and doesn't rock and roll, the price
is usually OK, too.

Alex
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Old 16-12-2008, 10:45 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Reseasoning cast iron

I found my notes and realized I posted something incorrect here
regarding reseasoning a pan that is rusted or over glopped. I had
posted to bead blast and then reseason on self clean. I skipped and
missorted some vital info that I need to correct.

Yes, for my situation, I need to start with bead blasting. But this
process will leave some fine grit on the pan that needs to be fully
removed. So after blasting, I need to wrap it tight in a plastic bag to
take home. Once home, I need to wash it thoroughly in sudsy warm water
to get all the bead blast and other grit off. Then, IMMEDIATELY put the
pan in the oven and self-clean once, perhaps twice, to remove all
moisture from the pores of the metal.

Then I can season by traditional methods such as frying bacon, taking
bacon grease and rubbing it all over then bake at 400 for a couple
hours, coat with veggie oil or shortening or lard .....

I knew the part of putting the pan in the oven on self clean was in
there, but it was the washing the grit that I missed, and when I saw
subsequent posts of how the self clean was too hot for seasoning, that
prompted me to start looking for that sheet of paper I had.

Sorry about my previous error.

jt


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