Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 10-07-2005, 02:35 PM
Grizzly
 
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Default Ok, you folks helped me make some incredible brisket--now onto pulled pork

Still usin' that Char-Broil Electric Water Smoker. (But I'm thinkin'
of saving up for a Big Green Egg--anyone have any experiences with one
good/bad? Are they substantially better (esp. in cold weather) than
other, lesser priced Smokers/Grills?)

I put in a 5 lb bone-in butt (I think--damned supermarket butcher
likes making up his own names for things--but it *looked* like a
bone-in butt) this morning about 1.5 hours ago.

The faq says 160-170 is the 'magic' temperature for when it'll be
pulled pork.

Also, will I get the same plateau as collegens break down (around
145-150) that I got with the brisket?

Any other tips/tricks?

Thanks again for everyone's help. You folks are great.

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Old 10-07-2005, 03:11 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"Grizzly" wrote in message

The faq says 160-170 is the 'magic' temperature for when it'll be
pulled pork.


Closer to 170

Also, will I get the same plateau as collegens break down (around
145-150) that I got with the brisket?


Usually about 160 has been my experience.


Any other tips/tricks?


Patience. Pick it up by the bone. If the bone pulls out, it is done.


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Old 10-07-2005, 03:13 PM
TT
 
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Default

Your temps are low for pork butt. The plateau is around 160-170 and pulling
is in the range of 185-190 (I usually pull mine off the cooker around 188
and then wrap it in foil for an hour or so).

"Grizzly" wrote in message
...
Still usin' that Char-Broil Electric Water Smoker. (But I'm thinkin'
of saving up for a Big Green Egg--anyone have any experiences with one
good/bad? Are they substantially better (esp. in cold weather) than
other, lesser priced Smokers/Grills?)

I put in a 5 lb bone-in butt (I think--damned supermarket butcher
likes making up his own names for things--but it *looked* like a
bone-in butt) this morning about 1.5 hours ago.

The faq says 160-170 is the 'magic' temperature for when it'll be
pulled pork.

Also, will I get the same plateau as collegens break down (around
145-150) that I got with the brisket?

Any other tips/tricks?

Thanks again for everyone's help. You folks are great.



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Old 10-07-2005, 04:01 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default


"TT" . wrote in message ...
Your temps are low for pork butt. The plateau is around 160-170 and
pulling is in the range of 185-190 (I usually pull mine off the cooker
around 188 and then wrap it in foil for an hour or so).


Normally I'd agree. Did one last week that just would not get over 172
after about 14 hours. It was the best I've ever made.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


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Old 10-07-2005, 10:34 PM
TFM®
 
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Default


"Grizzly" wrote in message
...
Still usin' that Char-Broil Electric Water Smoker. (But I'm thinkin'
of saving up for a Big Green Egg--anyone have any experiences with one
good/bad? Are they substantially better (esp. in cold weather) than
other, lesser priced Smokers/Grills?)




Dude, it's not the preferred ceramic smoker, but it's ceramic.

Check out this comparison.........

Heat a beer can up in a fire alongside a brick.

Throw them both into the snow.

Which one loses heat the fastest? (in my analogy the beer can is your
current cooker, the brick is the BGE®)

Ceramic cookers have more thermal mass, therefore *much* better heat
retention.


Not a ceramic cooker fan only because of the cost of them. I much prefer
concrete block which in a large enough configuration can afford the same
thermal mass as an egg or Kamado.




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Old 10-07-2005, 11:19 PM
Grizzly
 
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Default

You all rock.

With my crappy Char-broil, I just made th' best damned pulled pork I
ever had.

I still couldn't get the internal meat temp up above 174--and after
about 3 hours of it sitting at 174, I put a thermometer dead center on
the grill and guess what? 174. No wonder it wouldn't go higher! (And
that's with a wind shelter AND thermal insulation around th' thing.) I
wonder if altitude has anything to do with it--I'm at about 6000 feet.

Anyway I ended up finishing it in the oven at 250--took another hour,
hour-fifteen, maybe to get to 185. Then let it sit for an hour,
wrapped in foil. It shredded/pulled perfectly, the bark was fantastic
(I tasted while I was shredding) moist, juicy, melt-in-my-mouth
tender.

Only weird thing I noticed is that some parts of it were bright red
(from the smoke) and others weren't--does meat often absorb smoke
irregularly?

And until I can afford a real grill (it's gonna be a ceramic one, I
think) is it 'cheating' to finish it in the oven? I have a Weber Gas
Grill--would that be 'less cheating'?

Anyway, thanks again to everyone. This newbie really appreciates all
your help!



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Old 11-07-2005, 12:20 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default


"Grizzly" wrote in message
Only weird thing I noticed is that some parts of it were bright red
(from the smoke) and others weren't--does meat often absorb smoke
irregularly?


Yes. You can also get some chemical reaction from the bone.


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Old 11-07-2005, 03:35 AM
Louis Cohen
 
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Default

Grizzly wrote:
Still usin' that Char-Broil Electric Water Smoker. (But I'm thinkin'
of saving up for a Big Green Egg--anyone have any experiences with one
good/bad? Are they substantially better (esp. in cold weather) than
other, lesser priced Smokers/Grills?)

I put in a 5 lb bone-in butt (I think--damned supermarket butcher
likes making up his own names for things--but it *looked* like a
bone-in butt) this morning about 1.5 hours ago.

The faq says 160-170 is the 'magic' temperature for when it'll be
pulled pork.

Also, will I get the same plateau as collegens break down (around
145-150) that I got with the brisket?

Any other tips/tricks?

Thanks again for everyone's help. You folks are great.

I usually cook butt to 1bout 195° internal. The meat will pull at lower
temps, but still has a lot of fat; the mouth feel is just too greasy. I
find 195° renders a lot of the fat without drying the meat out.

The plateau is usually around 160°.

Any big heavy ceramic will be better in cold weather than a steel pit,
especially a thin wall (ie cheaper) one. There'sno reason you can make
great Q in a cheap pit, as long as you can keep the temp in the pit at
220-250°. It's just easier to do in a big heavy ceramic, especially in
cold or windy weather.

--

================================================== =============
Regards

Louis Cohen

"Yes, yes, I will desalinate you, you grande morue!"

Émile Zola, Assommoir 1877
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Old 11-07-2005, 11:26 AM
Brick
 
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Default


On 10-Jul-2005, Grizzly wrote:

You all rock.

With my crappy Char-broil, I just made th' best damned pulled pork I
ever had.


Congratulations. It's an open and shut case that with a little practice
one can make 'Q' that is superior in every respect to commercial offerings.]


I still couldn't get the internal meat temp up above 174--and after
about 3 hours of it sitting at 174, I put a thermometer dead center on
the grill and guess what? 174. No wonder it wouldn't go higher! (And
that's with a wind shelter AND thermal insulation around th' thing.) I
wonder if altitude has anything to do with it--I'm at about 6000 feet.


Voila!!! Altitude is the Archtypal enemy of the pitmaster. You need all the
draft you can get. I don't think there is a production BBQ Pit that is
actually suited to high altitude cooking. You need a 4" dia chimney from
grate level and at least 4 ft tall. You're not going to make it with a flat-
lander's rig. I lived in Longmont, Co for 12 years.


Anyway I ended up finishing it in the oven at 250--took another hour,
hour-fifteen, maybe to get to 185. Then let it sit for an hour,
wrapped in foil. It shredded/pulled perfectly, the bark was fantastic
(I tasted while I was shredding) moist, juicy, melt-in-my-mouth
tender.


If it's true that 'The end justifies the means', you have just proven it.

Only weird thing I noticed is that some parts of it were bright red
(from the smoke) and others weren't--does meat often absorb smoke
irregularly?


Apparently uneven smoke penetration is more common then not.

And until I can afford a real grill (it's gonna be a ceramic one, I
think) is it 'cheating' to finish it in the oven? I have a Weber Gas
Grill--would that be 'less cheating'?


The concept of 'cheating' is not applicable to good food. However,
shortcuts that result in less then superb 'Q' are unacceptable.

Anyway, thanks again to everyone. This newbie really appreciates all
your help!


You're more then welcome.
--
The Brick® said that (Don't bother to agree with me, I've already changed my
mind. )

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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Old 12-07-2005, 06:18 AM
Harry Demidavicius
 
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Default

On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 21:34:18 GMT, "TFM®"
wrote:


"Grizzly" wrote in message
.. .
Still usin' that Char-Broil Electric Water Smoker. (But I'm thinkin'
of saving up for a Big Green Egg--anyone have any experiences with one
good/bad? Are they substantially better (esp. in cold weather) than
other, lesser priced Smokers/Grills?)




Dude, it's not the preferred ceramic smoker, but it's ceramic.

Check out this comparison.........

Heat a beer can up in a fire alongside a brick.

Throw them both into the snow.

Which one loses heat the fastest? (in my analogy the beer can is your
current cooker, the brick is the BGE®)

Ceramic cookers have more thermal mass, therefore *much* better heat
retention.


Not a ceramic cooker fan only because of the cost of them. I much prefer
concrete block which in a large enough configuration can afford the same
thermal mass as an egg or Kamado.

Easier for you to operate too TFM. Florida doesn't experience heat
challenges. Doing the Christmas Turkey in Calgary would be a non
starter in Calgary, eh. The kamado just goes ahead & does it .

Harry


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Old 12-07-2005, 05:20 PM
bc
 
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Default

Brick wrote:
On 10-Jul-2005, Grizzly wrote:



I still couldn't get the internal meat temp up above 174--and after
about 3 hours of it sitting at 174, I put a thermometer dead center on
the grill and guess what? 174. No wonder it wouldn't go higher! (And
that's with a wind shelter AND thermal insulation around th' thing.) I
wonder if altitude has anything to do with it--I'm at about 6000 feet.


Voila!!! Altitude is the Archtypal enemy of the pitmaster. You need all the
draft you can get. I don't think there is a production BBQ Pit that is
actually suited to high altitude cooking. You need a 4" dia chimney from
grate level and at least 4 ft tall. You're not going to make it with a flat-
lander's rig. I lived in Longmont, Co for 12 years.


I live north of Longmont, and temp isn't a problem for me. Of course,
I have a Grilldome ceramic. Couldn't the OP just use a hotter (made
from kiln-dried) lump like cowboy? He might have to replenish a bit on
long cooks, but so what?

Or, he could get a GD.

- bc

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Old 12-07-2005, 05:23 PM
Grizzly
 
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Default

On 12 Jul 2005 09:20:24 -0700, "bc" wrote:

Brick wrote:
On 10-Jul-2005, Grizzly wrote:



I live north of Longmont, and temp isn't a problem for me. Of course,
I have a Grilldome ceramic. Couldn't the OP just use a hotter (made
from kiln-dried) lump like cowboy? He might have to replenish a bit on
long cooks, but so what?


It's an electric smoker--you can only crank it up so far...which seems
to be about 174! I suspect building a fire in it would be a *bad*
idea! ;-)


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Old 12-07-2005, 05:27 PM
bc
 
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Default



Grizzly wrote:
On 12 Jul 2005 09:20:24 -0700, "bc" wrote:

Brick wrote:
On 10-Jul-2005, Grizzly wrote:



I live north of Longmont, and temp isn't a problem for me. Of course,
I have a Grilldome ceramic. Couldn't the OP just use a hotter (made
from kiln-dried) lump like cowboy? He might have to replenish a bit on
long cooks, but so what?


It's an electric smoker--you can only crank it up so far...which seems
to be about 174! I suspect building a fire in it would be a *bad*
idea! ;-)


Oh yeah. Missed that. Well, sounds like you need a ceramic smoker
too! Gotta sear a steak now and then you know.

- bc



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