Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 02-08-2004, 06:56 PM
Dave Bugg
 
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Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

Eddie wrote:
Watching the food channel tonight where Q'n was being featured. Had a
great segment on how Kingsford was made.
So guess who invented the briquette?
Henry Ford, with a little help from a friend named Thomas Edison.


I also loved seeing the production process. They use shredded *fir* and
*cedar* wood, along with some alder. It's then run through, on a conveyor,
through a huge retort that "toasts" the shreds at 600F. Then coal is
added -- about a third of the mixture -- then the mash is compressed into
briquettes and put under heat to dry out the moisture. Funny, they forgot
to mention the starches and other materials that are also added, but they
sure seemed proud of the amount of bituminous coal added.

Yummmmm.

Think I'll stick to hardwood lump and wood.



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Old 02-08-2004, 07:17 PM
Dana Myers
 
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Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

Dave Bugg wrote:

Funny, they forgot
to mention the starches and other materials that are also added, but they
sure seemed proud of the amount of bituminous coal added.


Well, gas and coal are similar products, right? ;-)

Yummmmm.

Think I'll stick to hardwood lump and wood.


Agreed.

Cheers,
Dana
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Old 02-08-2004, 07:26 PM
Chris L.
 
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Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

Don't forget Borax,Coal tar. Clay,Lime, And other goodies.I'll never cook
with it.The stuff is just EVIL! IMHO.
Chris L.
"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...
Eddie wrote:
Watching the food channel tonight where Q'n was being featured. Had a
great segment on how Kingsford was made.
So guess who invented the briquette?
Henry Ford, with a little help from a friend named Thomas Edison.


I also loved seeing the production process. They use shredded *fir* and
*cedar* wood, along with some alder. It's then run through, on a conveyor,
through a huge retort that "toasts" the shreds at 600F. Then coal is
added -- about a third of the mixture -- then the mash is compressed into
briquettes and put under heat to dry out the moisture. Funny, they forgot
to mention the starches and other materials that are also added, but they
sure seemed proud of the amount of bituminous coal added.

Yummmmm.

Think I'll stick to hardwood lump and wood.




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Old 02-08-2004, 07:35 PM
JakBQuik
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette


"Dave Bugg" wrote



Think I'll stick to hardwood lump and wood.

Me too. It's amazing to me that briquettes and lighter fluid are still the
tools of choice for so many folks. My BIL still adds about 3 good squirts
of lighter fluid after the coals are going good!

John in Austin


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Old 02-08-2004, 07:51 PM
webkatz
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

Dave Bugg wrote:

Eddie wrote:

Watching the food channel tonight where Q'n was being featured. Had a
great segment on how Kingsford was made.
So guess who invented the briquette?
Henry Ford, with a little help from a friend named Thomas Edison.



I also loved seeing the production process. They use shredded *fir* and
*cedar* wood, along with some alder. It's then run through, on a conveyor,
through a huge retort that "toasts" the shreds at 600F. Then coal is
added -- about a third of the mixture -- then the mash is compressed into
briquettes and put under heat to dry out the moisture. Funny, they forgot
to mention the starches and other materials that are also added, but they
sure seemed proud of the amount of bituminous coal added.

Yummmmm.

Think I'll stick to hardwood lump and wood.



After using lump for several years I've been trying the Royal Oak
briquettes. According to my dealer, they have 2 lines of business - lump
charcoal (good stuff in it's own right) and using a steam press to turn
the leftover/undersized lump into briquettes (no coal, no paraffin, no
sawdust).

So far I'm pretty pleased with them. They seem a little bigger than your
Kingsford variety, smell like lump when burning, hold a nice constant
heat for a long time, and burn down to almost nothing.

Anybody else using this?

Dave


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Old 02-08-2004, 10:39 PM
Niki
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

JakBQuik wrote:

Me too. It's amazing to me that briquettes and lighter fluid are still the
tools of choice for so many folks. My BIL still adds about 3 good squirts
of lighter fluid after the coals are going good!


Last week I did something a lil different on the charcoal grill. After
the flames were dying down a bit, I lightly drizzled the not so hot
spots with a bit of vegetable oil. It was the best fire in a long time.

--
Niki
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Old 02-08-2004, 10:39 PM
Niki
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

JakBQuik wrote:

Me too. It's amazing to me that briquettes and lighter fluid are still the
tools of choice for so many folks. My BIL still adds about 3 good squirts
of lighter fluid after the coals are going good!


Last week I did something a lil different on the charcoal grill. After
the flames were dying down a bit, I lightly drizzled the not so hot
spots with a bit of vegetable oil. It was the best fire in a long time.

--
Niki
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Old 03-08-2004, 12:13 AM
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

Niki wrote:
JakBQuik wrote:

Me too. It's amazing to me that briquettes and lighter fluid are
still the tools of choice for so many folks. My BIL still adds
about 3 good squirts of lighter fluid after the coals are going good!


Last week I did something a lil different on the charcoal grill. After
the flames were dying down a bit, I lightly drizzled the not so hot
spots with a bit of vegetable oil. It was the best fire in a long
time.



Was trying to cook breakfast on an improvised (read I built it) grill in
Lochloosa, Fl some time back. Not having much luck with temps and trying to
cook bacon. My friend Ed tipped the skillet and let the bacon grease pour
into the fire.

What a difference that makes.

Actually needed more ventilation in the cooker, but bacon grease is a
wonderful substitue.


TFM®


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Old 03-08-2004, 12:13 AM
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

Niki wrote:
JakBQuik wrote:

Me too. It's amazing to me that briquettes and lighter fluid are
still the tools of choice for so many folks. My BIL still adds
about 3 good squirts of lighter fluid after the coals are going good!


Last week I did something a lil different on the charcoal grill. After
the flames were dying down a bit, I lightly drizzled the not so hot
spots with a bit of vegetable oil. It was the best fire in a long
time.



Was trying to cook breakfast on an improvised (read I built it) grill in
Lochloosa, Fl some time back. Not having much luck with temps and trying to
cook bacon. My friend Ed tipped the skillet and let the bacon grease pour
into the fire.

What a difference that makes.

Actually needed more ventilation in the cooker, but bacon grease is a
wonderful substitue.


TFM®


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Old 03-08-2004, 01:16 AM
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 10:56:13 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote:

Eddie wrote:
Watching the food channel tonight where Q'n was being featured. Had a
great segment on how Kingsford was made.
So guess who invented the briquette?
Henry Ford, with a little help from a friend named Thomas Edison.


I also loved seeing the production process. They use shredded *fir* and
*cedar* wood, along with some alder. It's then run through, on a conveyor,
through a huge retort that "toasts" the shreds at 600F. Then coal is
added -- about a third of the mixture -- then the mash is compressed into
briquettes and put under heat to dry out the moisture. Funny, they forgot
to mention the starches and other materials that are also added, but they
sure seemed proud of the amount of bituminous coal added.

Yummmmm.

Think I'll stick to hardwood lump and wood.



Yes I was thinking the same exact thing during that episode.

Jesse


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Old 03-08-2004, 01:16 AM
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 10:56:13 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote:

Eddie wrote:
Watching the food channel tonight where Q'n was being featured. Had a
great segment on how Kingsford was made.
So guess who invented the briquette?
Henry Ford, with a little help from a friend named Thomas Edison.


I also loved seeing the production process. They use shredded *fir* and
*cedar* wood, along with some alder. It's then run through, on a conveyor,
through a huge retort that "toasts" the shreds at 600F. Then coal is
added -- about a third of the mixture -- then the mash is compressed into
briquettes and put under heat to dry out the moisture. Funny, they forgot
to mention the starches and other materials that are also added, but they
sure seemed proud of the amount of bituminous coal added.

Yummmmm.

Think I'll stick to hardwood lump and wood.



Yes I was thinking the same exact thing during that episode.

Jesse
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Old 03-08-2004, 01:51 AM
Big Jim
 
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Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette


"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...
Eddie wrote:


So guess who invented the briquette?
Henry Ford, with a little help from a friend named Thomas Edison.


-- He did that to use up all the wood pallets he had laying around,
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com


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Old 03-08-2004, 01:54 AM
Steve Grinstead
 
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Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette


On 2-Aug-2004, webkatz wrote:

After using lump for several years I've been trying the Royal Oak
briquettes. According to my dealer, they have 2 lines of business - lump
charcoal (good stuff in it's own right) and using a steam press to turn
the leftover/undersized lump into briquettes (no coal, no paraffin, no
sawdust).

So far I'm pretty pleased with them. They seem a little bigger than your
Kingsford variety, smell like lump when burning, hold a nice constant
heat for a long time, and burn down to almost nothing.

Anybody else using this?


Just got a 40# bag of Royal Oak a couple weeks ago. So far i've worked
about 1/2 way through it. Don't get me wrong there's probably 10# or so in
my WSM that I did a mess of chicken wings on.

I also used about 10# to grill everything from chicken breasts to bratwurst.
I just kept shutting the weber kettle down. Next time i needed to light
the charcoal chucked into the chimney onto the propane burner for 5 minutes
(if that) 15-20 minutes later i was cooking

I see my Do it Best hardware store special ordering this stuff for me a lot!

May get some royal oak lump too, but for $15 for 40# of charcoal i couldn't
pass it up.

Steve
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Old 03-08-2004, 01:54 AM
Steve Grinstead
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette


On 2-Aug-2004, webkatz wrote:

After using lump for several years I've been trying the Royal Oak
briquettes. According to my dealer, they have 2 lines of business - lump
charcoal (good stuff in it's own right) and using a steam press to turn
the leftover/undersized lump into briquettes (no coal, no paraffin, no
sawdust).

So far I'm pretty pleased with them. They seem a little bigger than your
Kingsford variety, smell like lump when burning, hold a nice constant
heat for a long time, and burn down to almost nothing.

Anybody else using this?


Just got a 40# bag of Royal Oak a couple weeks ago. So far i've worked
about 1/2 way through it. Don't get me wrong there's probably 10# or so in
my WSM that I did a mess of chicken wings on.

I also used about 10# to grill everything from chicken breasts to bratwurst.
I just kept shutting the weber kettle down. Next time i needed to light
the charcoal chucked into the chimney onto the propane burner for 5 minutes
(if that) 15-20 minutes later i was cooking

I see my Do it Best hardware store special ordering this stuff for me a lot!

May get some royal oak lump too, but for $15 for 40# of charcoal i couldn't
pass it up.

Steve
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Old 03-08-2004, 01:54 AM
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Ha, I just found out who invented the briquette

Big Jim wrote:
"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...
Eddie wrote:


So guess who invented the briquette?
Henry Ford, with a little help from a friend named Thomas Edison.


-- He did that to use up all the wood pallets he had laying around,




Hey Slim, long time no see.

TFM®




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