Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 19-11-2003, 06:41 PM
Jack Curry
 
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Default Basting with bacon

"Faye Kinnitt" wrote in message
...
I did a 6 lb. Boston Butt yesterday in my electric
Brinkmann and covered the top and sides with
Bacon strips. The butt was rubbed previously with
one of the rubs from the BBQ faq. I put the fat side
down to keep it from getting overly done.

I had reference to using bacon on turkey breasts
somewhere and decided to give it a try.

After 4 hours at approximately 300 degrees, I removed
the bacon and gave the butt 2 more hours till the internal
temp reached 180 degrees. The bacon had kept the top
and side surfaces of the Butt from drying out for the period
it was on there and the additional 2 hours exposed was
enough to crisp up the surfaces without it being overly done.

The bacon was still a bit rubbery on ends which were
overlapped but a few seconds in the microwave crisped
them up nicely. The hickory smoked bacon is a bonus and
seemed to work nicely in lieu of basting to keep the top from
getting too crisp.

I'm sure I haven't invented anything new, however thought
I'd mention it. I'm surely going to do the same thing to my
turkey breast for Thanksgiving.

Bob

I think most of us really like that "crisp" stuff, called bark. It's what
really flavors the pulled pork when mixed in, but if you took yours off at
190°, I doubt it pulled.
Jack Curry



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Old 19-11-2003, 10:15 PM
Jack Schidt®
 
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Default Basting with bacon


"Barry" wrote in message
ink.net...
Isn't 300 degrees a bit hgh for smoking a but? I keep it lower to avoid

any drying out.
300 seems like it saves time though.



Not at all. Pork butt is very forgiving due to its fat content.

Jack


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Old 19-11-2003, 10:18 PM
Harry in Iowa
 
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Default Basting with bacon

Faye Kinnitt held forth in
:

I did a 6 lb. Boston Butt yesterday in my electric
Brinkmann and covered the top and sides with
Bacon strips. The butt was rubbed previously with
one of the rubs from the BBQ faq. I put the fat side
down to keep it from getting overly done.

I had reference to using bacon on turkey breasts
somewhere and decided to give it a try.

After 4 hours at approximately 300 degrees, I removed
the bacon and gave the butt 2 more hours till the internal
temp reached 180 degrees. The bacon had kept the top
and side surfaces of the Butt from drying out for the period
it was on there and the additional 2 hours exposed was
enough to crisp up the surfaces without it being overly done.

The bacon was still a bit rubbery on ends which were
overlapped but a few seconds in the microwave crisped
them up nicely. The hickory smoked bacon is a bonus and
seemed to work nicely in lieu of basting to keep the top from
getting too crisp.

I'm sure I haven't invented anything new, however thought
I'd mention it. I'm surely going to do the same thing to my
turkey breast for Thanksgiving.

Bob


My electric brinkman usually runs between 230 and 250. How is it you are
getting 300?

Harry in Iowa

--
'Its just NOTSO if you feel the need to contact me'
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Old 19-11-2003, 10:18 PM
BOB
 
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Default Low vs not-so-low/was: Basting with bacon

Barry typed:
Isn't 300 degrees a bit hgh for smoking a but? I keep it lower to avoid
any drying out.
300 seems like it saves time though.


Not really. I usually cook at 250 to 275, so 300 isn't really all that much
higher.
Recently, I did an experiment, cooked 2 butts, one right after the other.
First was cooked at about 350, the other cooked about 250. Both rubbed with
exactly the same rub. Both cooked to about 198 internal. Of course the 350 butt
took less time.
Side-by-side, you could tell a slight difference. Not really sure what the
difference was, texture or less fat maybe, but the 250 butt was better, in the
minds of the testers. Most of the tests were "blind".

I'm also guessing that without the side-by-side tests, especially if they had been
refrigerated and re-heated, most people couldn't tell the difference.

My conclusion? I'll keep on cooking at about 225 to 250 unless time is a
controlling factor, since with my brand of cooker (without any extra voo-doo type
equipment), I can get the temperature stabilized and then go on with other things
like sleeping or shopping if I keep the target time in mind.

BOB


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Old 19-11-2003, 11:07 PM
BOB
 
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Default Low vs not-so-low/was: Basting with bacon

Jack Schidt® typed:
" BOB" wrote...
Barry typed:
Isn't 300 degrees a bit hgh for smoking a but? I keep it lower to avoid
any drying out.
300 seems like it saves time though.


Not really. I usually cook at 250 to 275, so 300 isn't really all that

much
higher.
Recently, I did an experiment, cooked 2 butts, one right after the other.
First was cooked at about 350, the other cooked about 250. Both rubbed

with
exactly the same rub. Both cooked to about 198 internal. Of course the

350 butt
took less time.
Side-by-side, you could tell a slight difference. Not really sure what

the
difference was, texture or less fat maybe, but the 250 butt was better, in

the
minds of the testers. Most of the tests were "blind".


Or maybe the testers were blind. Buncha drunks.

HMMmmm? Never thought of that.
BUT one of the females doesn't drink alcohol (wimp!) and she consistantly went for
the low-and-slow, even when we switched the plates.




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Old 20-11-2003, 11:05 AM
frohe
 
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Default Basting with bacon

BOB wrote:
IMO, you have to be either a Texan or weird to like mesquite. Or
both.


Howdy from one weird Texican. g
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry


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Old 20-11-2003, 02:10 PM
Harry in Iowa
 
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Reg held forth in
. com:



Harry in Iowa wrote:

My electric brinkman usually runs between 230 and 250. How is it you
are getting 300?


Are you using an extension cord? They can reduce the current and lower
the temperature if they're not the heavy duty ones.


I don't use an extension cord and my temps are consistantly 230 to 250
depending on if the wood is smoking or burning, sometimes a little higher
if I put too much wood in.

Harry in Iowa

--
'Its just NOTSO if you feel the need to contact me'
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Old 20-11-2003, 02:17 PM
Harry in Iowa
 
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"The Fat Man®" held forth in
:

Barry wrote:

Isn't 300 degrees a bit hgh for smoking a but? I keep it lower to
avoid

any drying out.
300 seems like it saves time though.



The *slower* you cook it, the more apt you are to dry it out.

Sorry, but you've been reading too much internet barbecue advice.
That whole business about cooking at 220 is a myth. Nonsense.

Here's a couple of quotes from Bob in Ga. The quotes are from a reply
he sent me concerning whole hog cooking.

-------------------

"The methodology used to cook this classic bbq, in my opinion, was not
meant for huge thick cuts such as the shoulder-butts from #1 hogs that
are sold at grocery stores. Reason being that I don't subscribe to the
newfangled idea that the process was ever intended to be "low and
slow" ala internet hobbyist bbq. But I'll get to more on that later."


snippage

I recently did a 150 pound whole hog which due to either too much fuel or
the design of the pit cooked at 350 degrees F. It was done in 9 hours. I
was expecting a lot longer so at 3 in the A of M, myself and a couple of
family members were pulling pork.

Harry in Iowa

--
'Its just NOTSO if you feel the need to contact me'
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Old 20-11-2003, 06:25 PM
John O
 
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My electric brinkman usually runs between 230 and 250. How is it you
are getting 300?


Are you using an extension cord? They can reduce the current and lower
the temperature if they're not the heavy duty ones.


I don't use an extension cord and my temps are consistantly 230 to 250
depending on if the wood is smoking or burning, sometimes a little higher
if I put too much wood in.


Assuming this is a problem with the electrical system, and has nothing
whatsoever to do with ambient temps and wind and whatnot, the problem is
Ohm's Law. P=E²/R

Either the voltage is too low, or the resistance of the element is too high.
That keeps the power low which keeps the smoker cooler. Boost the AC voltage
or get an element with less resistance, and it'll generate more heat.

-John O


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Old 20-11-2003, 08:36 PM
BOB
 
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frohe typed:
BOB wrote:
IMO, you have to be either a Texan or weird to like mesquite. Or
both.


Howdy from one weird Texican. g
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry


(waving back at the Texican I hoped would read my reply)

vbg

BOB




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Old 20-11-2003, 11:42 PM
The Fat Man®
 
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Faye Kinnitt wrote:

I have determined that hickory has a much nicer flavor than
the mesquite I've been using up until now and would like to
get a hold of some fruitwood to try. I think the mesquite I have
left is going in the trash as it seems too harsh compared to the
hickory flavor.



Bob, stinkweed and pine needles would give off a better smell than mesquite.
You're doing the right thing by tossing it in the trash.

Those dang Texans have been trying to rid their state of the weed for years.
Their most successful attempt has been selling it to folks as BBQ wood.

I've eaten a *LOT* of BBQ in my day, and while I've never eaten anything
good that came from a mesquite fire, some folks say it's good for grilling.
I'm inclined to believe them, but for smoking it's worthless.


TFM®


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Old 21-11-2003, 11:22 AM
Brick
 
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"The Fat Man®" wrote


Bob, stinkweed and pine needles would give off a better smell than

mesquite.
You're doing the right thing by tossing it in the trash.

Those dang Texans have been trying to rid their state of the weed

for years.
Their most successful attempt has been selling it to folks as BBQ

wood.

I've eaten a *LOT* of BBQ in my day, and while I've never eaten

anything
good that came from a mesquite fire, some folks say it's good for

grilling.
I'm inclined to believe them, but for smoking it's worthless.


TFM®

I do believe you are correct TFM®. Years ago, I did a lot of grilling
with
mesquite, but there was now smoke involved other then from grease
drippings.
We burned mesquite in a brick pit and always let it reduce to coals
before
cooking on it.

Brick ( Didn't always have the money to buy real wood )


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Old 21-11-2003, 12:20 PM
Jack Schidt®
 
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"The Fat Man®" wrote in message
m...
Faye Kinnitt wrote:

I have determined that hickory has a much nicer flavor than
the mesquite I've been using up until now and would like to
get a hold of some fruitwood to try. I think the mesquite I have
left is going in the trash as it seems too harsh compared to the
hickory flavor.



Bob, stinkweed and pine needles would give off a better smell than

mesquite.
You're doing the right thing by tossing it in the trash.

Those dang Texans have been trying to rid their state of the weed for

years.
Their most successful attempt has been selling it to folks as BBQ wood.

I've eaten a *LOT* of BBQ in my day, and while I've never eaten anything
good that came from a mesquite fire, some folks say it's good for

grilling.
I'm inclined to believe them, but for smoking it's worthless.


TFM®



Grilling chicken and believe it or not, swordfish.

Jack


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Old 21-11-2003, 03:21 PM
Harry in Iowa
 
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Default Basting with bacon

"John O" held forth in
. com:

My electric brinkman usually runs between 230 and 250. How is it
you are getting 300?

Are you using an extension cord? They can reduce the current and
lower the temperature if they're not the heavy duty ones.


I don't use an extension cord and my temps are consistantly 230 to
250 depending on if the wood is smoking or burning, sometimes a
little higher if I put too much wood in.


Assuming this is a problem with the electrical system, and has nothing
whatsoever to do with ambient temps and wind and whatnot, the problem
is Ohm's Law. P=E²/R

Either the voltage is too low, or the resistance of the element is too
high. That keeps the power low which keeps the smoker cooler. Boost
the AC voltage or get an element with less resistance, and it'll
generate more heat.

-John O




I don't want more heat, 250 is just fine. I was wondering why his was
running 300. And ohms law make my head hurt. I have to go have a homebrew
now

Harry in Iowa
--
'Its just NOTSO if you feel the need to contact me'


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