Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 11-09-2005, 07:24 PM
mikehende
 
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Default Basting, how much, how often and when?

I usually grill small pieces Beef and pork steaks, some chicken, burgers
and Hot Dogs. I simply put a light coating of the BBQ sauce right from the
start, wait a little, turn it over, baste again and keep repeating this
until it is cooked.
Am I doing this correctly? Am I basting too much and too often? Sould I
wait until a certain time before basting? Should I stop basting at a
certain time?
How do you pros do the basting? Thanks


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Old 11-09-2005, 09:26 PM
Dave Bugg
 
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mikehende wrote:

How do you pros do the basting? Thanks


I don't. I always want the meat to be the flavor presented. But their is
no right or wrong way to baste, or not baste --- so do what works well for
you. Grilling, like bbq, should have the distinctive variation of the grill
or pit master's touch.

Except pulled-pork sammiches. They should always be eaten with slaw on top.
;-)
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Old 11-09-2005, 09:43 PM
kilikini
 
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Default


"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
...
mikehende wrote:

How do you pros do the basting? Thanks


I don't. I always want the meat to be the flavor presented. But their is
no right or wrong way to baste, or not baste --- so do what works well for
you. Grilling, like bbq, should have the distinctive variation of the

grill
or pit master's touch.

Except pulled-pork sammiches. They should always be eaten with slaw on

top.
;-)
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com



Dave, next time I visit, I'm going to have to try a pulled pork sammie with
slaw on top. Never had it before - but I've never had a pulled pork sammie
before either. I usually pick it off the carcass standing up in my kitchen
and later serve the leftovers up with plain cabbage.

kili


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Old 11-09-2005, 10:25 PM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"mikehende" wrote in message

How do you pros do the basting? Thanks


I don't baste at all. Tried it, but never fund much difference so I figures
I'd not bother. If I do decide to put a sauce on, it is for the last few
minutes of cooking.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


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Old 11-09-2005, 11:32 PM
Louis Cohen
 
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mikehende wrote:
I usually grill small pieces Beef and pork steaks, some chicken, burgers
and Hot Dogs. I simply put a light coating of the BBQ sauce right from the
start, wait a little, turn it over, baste again and keep repeating this
until it is cooked.
Am I doing this correctly? Am I basting too much and too often? Sould I
wait until a certain time before basting? Should I stop basting at a
certain time?
How do you pros do the basting? Thanks

The other day, I heard a TV chef say "never baset raw meat", but he
didn't say why. He basted after the first turn.

A sweet sauce would burn at grill temp - maybe that's why.

--

================================================== =============
Regards

Louis Cohen

"Yes, yes, I will desalinate you, you grande morue!"

Émile Zola, Assommoir 1877


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Old 12-09-2005, 01:03 AM
mikehende
 
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This what I can't understand guys, if you don't baste with BBQ sauce or any
sauce for that matter then how do you prevent the meat from burning?

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Old 12-09-2005, 01:11 AM
David G.
 
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mikehende wrote:
This what I can't understand guys, if you don't baste with BBQ
sauce or any sauce for that matter then how do you prevent the
meat from burning?


If your cooking low and slow, the meat won't burn. If your cooking on high
heat, your turning alot and watching so's
it doesn't burn.



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Old 12-09-2005, 01:22 AM
Dave Bugg
 
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mikehende wrote:

This what I can't understand guys, if you don't baste with BBQ sauce
or any sauce for that matter then how do you prevent the meat from
burning?


First, barbecue sauce is not a thermal protectant. It doesn't keep the meat
from burning. Unless, of course, you are using one of them new-fangled
ceramic-based sauces :-) You may *think* that your meat is not burning
because of the baste. It is more likely that your frequent basting is
causing the cooking chamber to cool down, thus reducing the amount of heat
geting to yer meat.

How do you control burnt meat during a cookout on a grill? Here are some
options, and you can combine two or more.

1. control the size of the fire.
2. lengthen the distance between the fire and meat.
3. baffle the fire from the meat.
4. decrease the length of the meat's exposure to the fire.
5. use temperature variation during the cooking process (ie, start hot, then
lower heat at a later point during the cooking process)

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Old 12-09-2005, 04:04 AM
 
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"mikehende" wrote:
I usually grill small pieces Beef and pork steaks, some chicken, burgers
and Hot Dogs. I simply put a light coating of the BBQ sauce right from
the start, wait a little, turn it over, baste again and keep repeating
this until it is cooked.
Am I doing this correctly? Am I basting too much and too often? Sould
I wait until a certain time before basting? Should I stop basting at a
certain time?
How do you pros do the basting? Thanks


How do you like your results? That's the bottom line. It ain't brain
surgery. With the stuff you say yer cookin', it ain't likely ta break ya ta
expuriment. Test it on yerself! Ya might even keep notes. Fer steaks I give
'em a rub with salt, pepper and garlic the night before. That's it! For
chicken, try Hound's brine. Burgers, s & p, garlic powder and a light touch
of Woostershere mixed in. Don't keep turnin' the stuff, except maybe the
hot dawgs. Turn it once. On somethin' that I'm cookin' long, low and slow,
I might give it a mop or 2 towards the end, dependin' on what I'm goin'
for. But, I'm not a pro, just the group faq nihil.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
http://saluteheroes.org/ & http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !
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Old 12-09-2005, 04:18 AM
 
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"kilikini" wrote:
"Dave Bugg" wrote in message
mikehende wrote:

How do you pros do the basting? Thanks


I don't. I always want the meat to be the flavor presented. But their
is no right or wrong way to baste, or not baste --- so do what works
well for you. Grilling, like bbq, should have the distinctive variation
of the grill or pit master's touch.

Except pulled-pork sammiches. They should always be eaten with slaw on
top.
;-)

Dave, next time I visit, I'm going to have to try a pulled pork sammie
with slaw on top. Never had it before - but I've never had a pulled pork
sammie before either. I usually pick it off the carcass standing up in
my kitchen and later serve the leftovers up with plain cabbage.

A short step away from cabbage is heavenly slaw. Bob in SoCal, Eddie,
Fosco, Frohe, Jack Curry and kili (!), have all posted slaw recipes here or
on a.b.f.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
http://saluteheroes.org/ & http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !


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Old 12-09-2005, 04:45 AM
Abe
 
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Fer steaks I give
'em a rub with salt, pepper and garlic the night before. That's it!

What, no onion powder? Oh man, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and onion
powder makes it for me when it comes to steaks.
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Old 12-09-2005, 07:14 AM
 
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"mikehende" wrote:
This what I can't understand guys, if you don't baste with BBQ sauce or
any sauce for that matter then how do you prevent the meat from burning?


Fire control, distance from fire control, timing.
Have you read the BBQ FAQ?

http://www.eaglequest.com/%7Ebbq/faq2/toc.html

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
http://saluteheroes.org/ & http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !
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Old 12-09-2005, 07:41 AM
 
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Abe wrote:
Fer steaks I give
'em a rub with salt, pepper and garlic the night before. That's it!

What, no onion powder? Oh man, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and onion
powder makes it for me when it comes to steaks.


That's what I love about this place. Different strokes, etc. and
ever'body's happy!

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
http://saluteheroes.org/ & http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !
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Old 12-09-2005, 03:14 PM
LewZephyr
 
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Default

On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 20:45:34 -0700, I needed a babel fish to
understand Abe :

Fer steaks I give
'em a rub with salt, pepper and garlic the night before. That's it!

What, no onion powder? Oh man, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and onion
powder makes it for me when it comes to steaks.


I been using Montreal Steak Seasoning... from costco.... really
enjoyed the flavor...

I also place a little pat of garlic butter on the steak just as they
come out. (I crush the garlic fresh and mix it with the butter).
----------------------------------------
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is
indistinguishable from magic."
- Arthur C. Clarke
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Old 12-09-2005, 03:24 PM
Matthew L. Martin
 
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LewZephyr wrote:
On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 20:45:34 -0700, I needed a babel fish to
understand Abe :


Fer steaks I give
'em a rub with salt, pepper and garlic the night before. That's it!


What, no onion powder? Oh man, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and onion
powder makes it for me when it comes to steaks.



I been using Montreal Steak Seasoning... from costco.... really
enjoyed the flavor...


I find that too salty. I cut it, 50/50 with dried basil. Everyone in the
family likes it that way.

I also place a little pat of garlic butter on the steak just as they
come out. (I crush the garlic fresh and mix it with the butter).


This I will have to try.

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game


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