Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 26-05-2007, 12:04 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

Anyone have a good recipe / procedure for beef jerky?
Thanks
Bob-tx



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Old 27-05-2007, 02:32 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Bob wrote:
Anyone have a good recipe / procedure for beef jerky?
Thanks
Bob-tx


2 pounds (about 1 kg) venison or beef sliced 1/8-inch (3 mm)
thick
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 cup (240 ml) bourbon or 2 cups (480 ml) red wine
1 cup (240 ml) water

Marinate overnight in the refrigerator in a non-metal pan,
covered. (I use a zip-lock bag) Coat with a mixture of 1/2
honey and 1/2 water and hang on a rack for 8 hours to dry.

Place in a cold smoker for 12 hours.

Example of a cold smoker:
http://www.jtbuckonline.com/index.as...ROD&ProdID=182



--
Steve
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Old 27-05-2007, 03:04 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

On Sat, 26 May 2007 05:04:45 -0600, Bob wrote:

Anyone have a good recipe / procedure for beef jerky?
Thanks
Bob-tx


Here's my oven instructions. The same goes for smoking, pretty
much, except that you want the jerky strips to dry somewhat after
draining the marinade.

------

Trim meat of all visible fat, gristle, and especially sinew.
Slice meat about 1/4th" thick, as evenly as possible, and with
the grain (not across the grain). With venison it may be hard to
tell which way the grain is running since it is very finely
grained. A good rule of thumb is that the grain runs parallel to
any sinew. Partially freezing meat helps make the meat easier to
slice thinner and more evenly.

Marinate the sliced meat for 2-8 hours (depending on strength of
marinade and thickness of meat) in any combination of the
following ingredients:

Water
Soy sauce
Worcestershire sauce
Sugar (not much, of any)
Tabasco
Black pepper
Crushed red pepper flakes/seeds
Teriyaki sauce.
Smoked salt (available in the bulk spice section of Whole Foods)
Liquid smoke
Onion powder
Garlic Powder
Salt

Do not use any sort of oil/fats in the marinade.

Whichever ingredients you choose, make sure that it is somewhat
salty. Using soy or Worcestershire makes the meat salty enough
without adding additional salt. Most marinades will require the
addition of some amount of water to thin them down as the
ingredients used are usually pretty potent by themselves.

The marinade only needs to barely cover meat - no more than 1 cup
for 2lbs of meat. The meat should not be swimming in marinade.
Stir several times during the marinating. The time needed to
marinade will be dependent on the thickness of the meat and the
strength of the marinade. A good way to test your meat is to fry
a piece of it in a hot skillet to see what kind of flavor the end
product will have. Note that the meat will shrink 60-80%, so
flavors will concentrate in the end-product. If the meat is too
salty or pungent, you may rinse off the meat and let soak in
water for a few minutes. Experience will tell you when you have
a good marinade without having to test it.

Strain the marinade from the meat using a colander or wire mesh
strainer. Toss the meat with any extra coarse ground pepper or
red pepper flakes (if using) at this time.

Spread meat flat on wire racks over cookie sheets or cake pans or
anything that has low (or no) sides to promote air circulation.
The meat should not be overlapping and should not be touching
other pieces. You'll probably need several racks/pans to spread
out the meat. If you still want to add any extra pepper/red
pepper, shake it on now.

Place racks in a *low* oven. Some ovens may only down to 180-200
degrees. This is too hot. You want the temperature in the oven
to cycle between 130F and 140F. Anything over 155 or so will
cook the meat and leave you with crumbly, hard jerky.

Pans may be placed on both oven racks at the same time, but
switch the pans between oven racks every couple hours to help
them dry evenly. Turn each piece of meat over after 2-3 hours.
You usually only need to turn it once.

Some ovens have vents that vent to the stove top. I place an
electronic probe thermometer in this vent to monitor the oven
temperature. If this is not possible, then use an oven
thermometer inside the oven. You could even use a meat
thermometer placed on one of the racks since the oven temps will
not be very high.

The oven should also be vented on the front side. The 3-4" gap
where most oven doors rest is too wide. The oven will cycle
on/off too often if you leave the door in this position. I place
a wooden spoon in the oven opening and close the door on it. This
leaves a less than 1" gap to allow moisture to escape. If you
have a convection (fan) feature in your oven, use it. If you have
an electric oven that allows you turn on both top and bottom
elements at the same time (without reaching broiling
temperatures), use both elements.

Jerky will be dry enough in 6-18 hours, depending on thickness.
The meat will be noticeably smaller in 4-5 hours and will look
dry. It probably isn't dry yet, despite how it looks. Jerky
should still be pliable, but not crumbly when finished. Some
pieces of meat may finish sooner than others. You can remove
these and allow the remainder to dehydrate longer. It's better to
under-dry than to over-dry. Knowing when to remove it just takes
some experience. Note that the meat will continue to dry slightly
after taken out of the oven.

When you think it's done, let the racks sit on the counter for
30-60 minutes, then place the jerky into a zip-lock bag and put
them into the fridge overnight. This will help the remaining
moisture in the meat even out and come to the drier surface of
the meat. Jerky right out of the oven will be very dry on the
outside, and slightly moist on the inside. So let it rest in the
fridge to stabilize the moisture.

If your jerky is still too moist the next morning, keep it
refrigerated at all times and eat it quickly, or you can dry it
further in the oven. Storing any home made jerky in the fridge
isn't a bad idea. It warms up quickly when taken out of the
fridge. Large amounts can be frozen. How long your jerky will
last is dependent on many factors and beyond the scope and
liability of these instructions. If you've done it right, it
shouldn't last long anyway.

Good Luck.

Steve Wertz
November 16th, 2006
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Old 27-05-2007, 03:50 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky


"Steve Calvin" wrote in message
...

Place in a cold smoker for 12 hours.


Does that mean just moving air, no heat or actual smoke? Reason I ask is
that I have a large commercial jerky oven (not as seen on TV) that uses
electric heat, moving air and no smoke.
I have had it for quite some time but have never used it (it's never been
used, found at an estate sale) so have been looking for good info to try
with it for a first time run. RM~



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Old 27-05-2007, 04:00 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

Rob Mills wrote:
"Steve Calvin" wrote in message
...

Place in a cold smoker for 12 hours.


Does that mean just moving air, no heat or actual smoke? Reason I ask is
that I have a large commercial jerky oven (not as seen on TV) that uses
electric heat, moving air and no smoke.
I have had it for quite some time but have never used it (it's never been
used, found at an estate sale) so have been looking for good info to try
with it for a first time run. RM~



No, it's a very low heat. In the unit I pointed to, there's
a 250W electric element in the bottom and a metal "chip" pan
sits on top of the element for holding wood chips to
generate the smoke. Don't expect to see smoke pouring out
of it, ain't gonna happen, but the final product will have a
smoke flavor to it whether it be cheese, turkey, jerky, fish
or whatever.

I sometimes put sirloin steaks in it for an hour or so
before grilling too. It's a nice change once in a while.

All that said, I can't stand mesquite... I really doubt if
many Texans really use it. I think they just created a bunch
of hype about it so they could rip the Yankees off.... ;-D

--
Steve


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Old 27-05-2007, 05:08 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky


"Steve Calvin" wrote in message
...

No, it's a very low heat. In the unit I pointed to, there's a 250W
electric element in the bottom and a metal "chip" pan sits on top of the
element for holding wood chips to generate the smoke.


That's interesting, sounds about like the one I have (mine is mdf covered
with formica) but I don't have a chip tray. Guess I could add one with no
problems. I do have an internally adjustable thermostat. Guess I'll knock
the dust off of it and do some tinkering.

All that said, I can't stand mesquite...


Amen brother, guess they have to burn the stuff to get rid of it.
RM ~




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Old 28-05-2007, 12:45 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Bob Bob is offline
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Default Making jerky


"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 26 May 2007 05:04:45 -0600, Bob wrote:

Anyone have a good recipe / procedure for beef jerky?
Thanks
Bob-tx


Here's my oven instructions. The same goes for smoking, pretty
much, except that you want the jerky strips to dry somewhat after
draining the marinade.

------snip


Thanks, sounds mighty good, a bit of a job, but like most things, no
doubt worth it.
Bob-tx


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Old 28-05-2007, 03:14 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

Shawn wrote:
Steve Calvin wrote:
Rob Mills wrote:
"Steve Calvin" wrote in message
...


snip

All that said, I can't stand mesquite... I really doubt if
many Texans really use it. I think they just created a bunch
of hype about it so they could rip the Yankees off.... ;-D



Hey! You're blowing our marketing program here.
We figured out a couple of decades ago that the only way to rid ourselves of
this nusance weed was to create a global market for it.


oops, sorry. Previous, and obviously ridiculous statement is
hereby retracted. ;-)

--
Steve
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Old 28-05-2007, 03:46 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

Steve Calvin wrote:
Rob Mills wrote:
"Steve Calvin" wrote in message
...


snip

All that said, I can't stand mesquite... I really doubt if
many Texans really use it. I think they just created a bunch
of hype about it so they could rip the Yankees off.... ;-D



Hey! You're blowing our marketing program here.
We figured out a couple of decades ago that the only way to rid ourselves of
this nusance weed was to create a global market for it.


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Old 28-05-2007, 04:17 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky



Shawn wrote:


Hey! You're blowing our marketing program here.
We figured out a couple of decades ago that the only way to rid ourselves of
this nusance weed was to create a global market for it.


I think that the finest Porterhouse I ever ate was at some restaurant in
Austin, back in the 70's. The steak was grilled over Mesquite coals and
served with a ladle of Pintos in a tin plate. I've had many steaks in
my life, including Angus steers that started out life after weening on
corn/hay/drylass and hung for 30+ days before cutting. Never, have I
had a finer steak than that night in Austin, and I've never been able to
recreate it.

--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.


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Old 28-05-2007, 01:23 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

Nonnymus wrote:
Shawn wrote:


Hey! You're blowing our marketing program here.
We figured out a couple of decades ago that the only way to rid
ourselves of this nusance weed was to create a global market for it.


I think that the finest Porterhouse I ever ate was at some restaurant
in Austin, back in the 70's. The steak was grilled over Mesquite
coals and served with a ladle of Pintos in a tin plate. I've had
many steaks in my life, including Angus steers that started out life
after weening on corn/hay/drylass and hung for 30+ days before
cutting. Never, have I had a finer steak than that night in Austin,
and I've never been able to recreate it.



That's probably the difference. Once it has burned down to coals, the
flavor mekkows a lot. Most folks don't go to the effort of pre-burning
before adding to the smoker.

If you pre-burn to coals first, I think you can get acceptable Q from just
about any non-processed hardwood. (with the exception of Cowboy lump. (Who
knows what they put in that stuff))


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Old 28-05-2007, 01:24 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

Shawn wrote:
Nonnymus wrote:
Shawn wrote:


Hey! You're blowing our marketing program here.
We figured out a couple of decades ago that the only way to rid
ourselves of this nusance weed was to create a global market for it.


I think that the finest Porterhouse I ever ate was at some restaurant
in Austin, back in the 70's. The steak was grilled over Mesquite
coals and served with a ladle of Pintos in a tin plate. I've had
many steaks in my life, including Angus steers that started out life
after weening on corn/hay/drylass and hung for 30+ days before
cutting. Never, have I had a finer steak than that night in Austin,
and I've never been able to recreate it.



That's probably the difference. Once it has burned down to coals, the
flavor mekkows a lot. Most folks don't go to the effort of
pre-burning before adding to the smoker.

If you pre-burn to coals first, I think you can get acceptable Q from
just about any non-processed hardwood. (with the exception of Cowboy
lump. (Who knows what they put in that stuff))


I ment "Mellows" (Put down the coffee cup, and back away from the
computer)


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Old 28-05-2007, 07:21 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky



Shawn wrote:
Nonnymus wrote:
Shawn wrote:

Hey! You're blowing our marketing program here.
We figured out a couple of decades ago that the only way to rid
ourselves of this nusance weed was to create a global market for it.

I think that the finest Porterhouse I ever ate was at some restaurant
in Austin, back in the 70's. The steak was grilled over Mesquite
coals and served with a ladle of Pintos in a tin plate. I've had
many steaks in my life, including Angus steers that started out life
after weening on corn/hay/drylass and hung for 30+ days before
cutting. Never, have I had a finer steak than that night in Austin,
and I've never been able to recreate it.



That's probably the difference. Once it has burned down to coals, the
flavor mekkows a lot. Most folks don't go to the effort of pre-burning
before adding to the smoker.

If you pre-burn to coals first, I think you can get acceptable Q from just
about any non-processed hardwood. (with the exception of Cowboy lump. (Who
knows what they put in that stuff))


I think this is true for about any wood. FWIW, I almost always cooked
on pre burn when I was more active in grilling and smoking. I presently
am limited in smoking to my Bradley, which uses compressed wood pucks,
fed onto a heater every 20 minutes. The heater seems to be a reasonable
compromise between lump and pre burn, since you get a good smoke flavor
without much creosote or tars. In the case of the Mesquite pucks,
however, I don't like the flavor as much as the traditional pre burn
Mesquite. I don't understand the "why," of this, but have about given
up using the Mesquite pucks and am sticking to Apple, Alder and the
"special blend."


--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.
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Old 29-05-2007, 01:32 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky

Nonnymus wrote:
Shawn wrote:
Nonnymus wrote:
Shawn wrote:

Hey! You're blowing our marketing program here.
We figured out a couple of decades ago that the only way to rid
ourselves of this nusance weed was to create a global market for
it.
I think that the finest Porterhouse I ever ate was at some
restaurant in Austin, back in the 70's. The steak was grilled over
Mesquite coals and served with a ladle of Pintos in a tin plate. I've
had many steaks in my life, including Angus steers that
started out life after weening on corn/hay/drylass and hung for 30+
days before cutting. Never, have I had a finer steak than that
night in Austin, and I've never been able to recreate it.



That's probably the difference. Once it has burned down to coals,
the flavor mekkows a lot. Most folks don't go to the effort of
pre-burning before adding to the smoker.

If you pre-burn to coals first, I think you can get acceptable Q
from just about any non-processed hardwood. (with the exception of
Cowboy lump. (Who knows what they put in that stuff))


I think this is true for about any wood. FWIW, I almost always cooked
on pre burn when I was more active in grilling and smoking. I
presently am limited in smoking to my Bradley, which uses compressed
wood pucks, fed onto a heater every 20 minutes. The heater seems to
be a reasonable compromise between lump and pre burn, since you get a
good smoke flavor without much creosote or tars. In the case of the
Mesquite pucks, however, I don't like the flavor as much as the
traditional pre burn Mesquite. I don't understand the "why," of
this, but have about given up using the Mesquite pucks and am
sticking to Apple, Alder and the "special blend."



I actually prefer hill country post oak myself.


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Old 30-05-2007, 02:04 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making jerky


"Steve Calvin" wrote in message
...
Bob wrote:
Anyone have a good recipe / procedure for beef jerky?
Thanks
Bob-tx

2 pounds (about 1 kg) venison or beef sliced 1/8-inch (3 mm) thick
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 cup (240 ml) bourbon or 2 cups (480 ml) red wine
1 cup (240 ml) water

Marinate overnight in the refrigerator in a non-metal pan, covered. (I use
a zip-lock bag) Coat with a mixture of 1/2 honey and 1/2 water and hang on
a rack for 8 hours to dry.

Place in a cold smoker for 12 hours.

Example of a cold smoker:
http://www.jtbuckonline.com/index.as...ROD&ProdID=182



--
Steve


A little cheif aint a cold smoker.
Having said that I have used smokers like this for years. they are great
for Salmon and fish




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