Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-12-2003, 01:49 AM
Alex Rast
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

Here's a recipe I perfected today for cornbread that has no wheat flour,
only cornmeal. It comes out somewhat cakey, mildly sweet (not candylike) -
exactly what I expect of cornbread.

This is a great recipe for those times when you accidentally leave a carton
of milk in the fridge that one too many days, or were hoping it might
survive a couple of days longer, but didn't, because it calls for sour
milk. Don't try this, however, if your milk was ultra-pasteurized: I don't
think it'll work with that, in fact, I don't believe (people who use it
frequently, correct me if this is not so) that it ever goes sour at all.
Also don't try it if the milk has gone beyond sour into the cheesey stage.

Cornbread

2 cups cornmeal
2 cups sour milk
3 eggs
2 tbsp butter
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 450F. Thoroughly butter a heavy cast-iron pan. A 10"
skillet is ideal.

Mix cornmeal, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl until fully blended.
Cut butter in until the mixture is fairly uniform. In a separate bowl,
beat the eggs with a whisk or mixer until they are frothy and pale yellow.
Put the pan in the oven and allow it to heat until it is nearly smoking.

At this point, quickly beat the eggs into the cornmeal, then the sour milk,
then pour the entire batter into the pan and set in the oven quickly. After
about 5 minutes, turn the oven down to 400 without opening the door. Bake
for another 25 minutes or so, until the top is dark, uniform brown. Remove
and cool.

This cornbread is delicious eaten warm - simply wait for about
5 minutes or so, until it cools to edible temperature, then cut into
wedges. Or cool all the way if you prefer it at room temperature.
--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-12-2003, 06:39 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

(Alex Rast) wrote in
:

Here's a recipe I perfected today for cornbread that has no wheat
flour, only cornmeal. It comes out somewhat cakey, mildly sweet (not
candylike) - exactly what I expect of cornbread.

This is a great recipe for those times when you accidentally leave a
carton of milk in the fridge that one too many days, or were hoping it
might survive a couple of days longer, but didn't, because it calls
for sour milk. Don't try this, however, if your milk was
ultra-pasteurized: I don't think it'll work with that, in fact, I
don't believe (people who use it frequently, correct me if this is not
so) that it ever goes sour at all. Also don't try it if the milk has
gone beyond sour into the cheesey stage.


You are correct. It simply spoils and never really goes through a
"sour" stage.


Cornbread

2 cups cornmeal
2 cups sour milk
3 eggs
2 tbsp butter
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 450F. Thoroughly butter a heavy cast-iron pan. A 10"
skillet is ideal.

Mix cornmeal, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl until fully
blended. Cut butter in until the mixture is fairly uniform. In a
separate bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk or mixer until they are
frothy and pale yellow. Put the pan in the oven and allow it to heat
until it is nearly smoking.

At this point, quickly beat the eggs into the cornmeal, then the sour
milk, then pour the entire batter into the pan and set in the oven
quickly. After about 5 minutes, turn the oven down to 400 without
opening the door. Bake for another 25 minutes or so, until the top is
dark, uniform brown. Remove and cool.

This cornbread is delicious eaten warm - simply wait for about
5 minutes or so, until it cools to edible temperature, then cut into
wedges. Or cool all the way if you prefer it at room temperature.


Alex,

This is exactly the way that I and my family (back to grandmother) have
been making cornbread for generations...the same ingredients and the same
proportions However, I often use buttermilk in place of sour milk since
I rarely have sour milk on hand. Occasionally I will substitute bacon
drippings for the butter. In any event, it is delicious!

BTW, whenever I can get it, I use stone-ground cornmeal. It's even
better, so do give it a try if you haven't already.

Wayne
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-12-2003, 04:25 AM
Isaac Wingfield
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

In article ,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

(Alex Rast) wrote in
:

Here's a recipe I perfected today for cornbread that has no wheat
flour, only cornmeal. It comes out somewhat cakey, mildly sweet (not
candylike) - exactly what I expect of cornbread.

This is a great recipe for those times when you accidentally leave a
carton of milk in the fridge that one too many days, or were hoping it
might survive a couple of days longer, but didn't, because it calls
for sour milk. Don't try this, however, if your milk was
ultra-pasteurized: I don't think it'll work with that, in fact, I
don't believe (people who use it frequently, correct me if this is not
so) that it ever goes sour at all. Also don't try it if the milk has
gone beyond sour into the cheesey stage.


You are correct. It simply spoils and never really goes through a
"sour" stage.


Cornbread

2 cups cornmeal
2 cups sour milk
3 eggs
2 tbsp butter
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 450F. Thoroughly butter a heavy cast-iron pan. A 10"
skillet is ideal.

Mix cornmeal, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl until fully
blended. Cut butter in until the mixture is fairly uniform. In a
separate bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk or mixer until they are
frothy and pale yellow. Put the pan in the oven and allow it to heat
until it is nearly smoking.

At this point, quickly beat the eggs into the cornmeal, then the sour
milk, then pour the entire batter into the pan and set in the oven
quickly. After about 5 minutes, turn the oven down to 400 without
opening the door. Bake for another 25 minutes or so, until the top is
dark, uniform brown. Remove and cool.

This cornbread is delicious eaten warm - simply wait for about
5 minutes or so, until it cools to edible temperature, then cut into
wedges. Or cool all the way if you prefer it at room temperature.


Alex,

This is exactly the way that I and my family (back to grandmother) have
been making cornbread for generations


--snip--

And ours.

Try cooking it in a cast-iron skillet for a wonderful crust.

Here's our family recipe, from Arkansas:

1-1/2 C corn meal (white or yellow)
1 t baking soda
1 t salt
1 egg
2 C buttermilk ("fake" buttermilk, from adding vinegar to fresh milk,
will work too)

Mix thoroughly. The batter will be thin. Important: mix just before the
pan is ready, or the baking soda will be "all foamed out".

In hot oven (400 F), heat heavy pan (I use a cast-iron skillet) with 2 T
bacon fat (anything else is _not_authentic_) until almost smoking. Add
batter and bake until brown. When the bread pulls away from the sides of
the pan, it's probably ready. Test it with a toothpick.

--

For New Year's Day, we always cook up a "mess" of black-eyed peas
(really beans). Don't forget to put a hamhock or a piece of salt pork in
with the peas, and make a pan of cornbread.

To serve, slice a piece of cornbread through the middle and open it up
on the plate. Then spoon the peas over, including as much "juice" as you
like.

Note: Black-eyed peas cook a *lot* faster than most other kinds of dried
beans. A couple or three hours will do it, with *no* pre-soaking. If you
cook them too long, they'll turn to mush.

Isaac
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-12-2003, 04:46 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

Isaac Wingfield wrote in
:

In article ,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

(Alex Rast) wrote in
:

Here's a recipe I perfected today for cornbread that has no wheat
flour, only cornmeal. It comes out somewhat cakey, mildly sweet
(not candylike) - exactly what I expect of cornbread.

This is a great recipe for those times when you accidentally leave
a carton of milk in the fridge that one too many days, or were
hoping it might survive a couple of days longer, but didn't,
because it calls for sour milk. Don't try this, however, if your
milk was ultra-pasteurized: I don't think it'll work with that, in
fact, I don't believe (people who use it frequently, correct me if
this is not so) that it ever goes sour at all. Also don't try it if
the milk has gone beyond sour into the cheesey stage.


You are correct. It simply spoils and never really goes through a
"sour" stage.


Cornbread

2 cups cornmeal
2 cups sour milk
3 eggs
2 tbsp butter
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 450F. Thoroughly butter a heavy cast-iron pan. A
10" skillet is ideal.

Mix cornmeal, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl until fully
blended. Cut butter in until the mixture is fairly uniform. In a
separate bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk or mixer until they are
frothy and pale yellow. Put the pan in the oven and allow it to
heat until it is nearly smoking.

At this point, quickly beat the eggs into the cornmeal, then the
sour milk, then pour the entire batter into the pan and set in the
oven quickly. After about 5 minutes, turn the oven down to 400
without opening the door. Bake for another 25 minutes or so, until
the top is dark, uniform brown. Remove and cool.

This cornbread is delicious eaten warm - simply wait for about
5 minutes or so, until it cools to edible temperature, then cut
into wedges. Or cool all the way if you prefer it at room
temperature.


Alex,

This is exactly the way that I and my family (back to grandmother)
have been making cornbread for generations


--snip--

And ours.

Try cooking it in a cast-iron skillet for a wonderful crust.

Here's our family recipe, from Arkansas:

1-1/2 C corn meal (white or yellow)
1 t baking soda
1 t salt
1 egg
2 C buttermilk ("fake" buttermilk, from adding vinegar to fresh milk,
will work too)

Mix thoroughly. The batter will be thin. Important: mix just before
the pan is ready, or the baking soda will be "all foamed out".

In hot oven (400 F), heat heavy pan (I use a cast-iron skillet) with 2
T bacon fat (anything else is _not_authentic_) until almost smoking.
Add batter and bake until brown. When the bread pulls away from the
sides of the pan, it's probably ready. Test it with a toothpick.

--

For New Year's Day, we always cook up a "mess" of black-eyed peas
(really beans). Don't forget to put a hamhock or a piece of salt pork
in with the peas, and make a pan of cornbread.

To serve, slice a piece of cornbread through the middle and open it up
on the plate. Then spoon the peas over, including as much "juice" as
you like.

Note: Black-eyed peas cook a *lot* faster than most other kinds of
dried beans. A couple or three hours will do it, with *no*
pre-soaking. If you cook them too long, they'll turn to mush.

Isaac


Isaac, this sounds great, too! One question, though... When I have
added more milk than cornmeal to my batter, the bread seems to test
done, but it almost always sticks to the pan. I use a sizzling hot
skillet. The bottom is crust, but still sticks in a couple of spots.
With an equal amount of milk and meal, or even slightly less so of milk,
I never had that problem. I'd like to try your version but I'm leery of
it sticking. What do you think might be the problem?

I'm a great fan of black-eyed peas spooned over a hot split wedge of
cornbread! Delicious!!! I also always slosh a bit of homemade
"pepper-sauce" on top. I sometimes use a hunk of bacon if I can't get
the hamhock or salt pork.

Wayne (whose family is from NE MS)
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2003, 07:15 PM
Ronni
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

I'm looking forward to trying your recipe for corn bread...I just have one
question....
Do you have any suggestions for baking with a glass pan? I have the 9 inch
square and the traditional 'cake' pan in glass, they are both heavy but not
near a cast iron weight. Should I do anything different or try a whole
different recipe? I have never made my own cornbread but would love to. I
love corn bread and the mixes and store bought jsut isn't what I want in
cornbread. thanks


"Isaac Wingfield" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

(Alex Rast) wrote in
:

Here's a recipe I perfected today for cornbread that has no wheat
flour, only cornmeal. It comes out somewhat cakey, mildly sweet (not
candylike) - exactly what I expect of cornbread.

This is a great recipe for those times when you accidentally leave a
carton of milk in the fridge that one too many days, or were hoping it
might survive a couple of days longer, but didn't, because it calls
for sour milk. Don't try this, however, if your milk was
ultra-pasteurized: I don't think it'll work with that, in fact, I
don't believe (people who use it frequently, correct me if this is not
so) that it ever goes sour at all. Also don't try it if the milk has
gone beyond sour into the cheesey stage.


You are correct. It simply spoils and never really goes through a
"sour" stage.


Cornbread

2 cups cornmeal
2 cups sour milk
3 eggs
2 tbsp butter
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 450F. Thoroughly butter a heavy cast-iron pan. A 10"
skillet is ideal.

Mix cornmeal, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl until fully
blended. Cut butter in until the mixture is fairly uniform. In a
separate bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk or mixer until they are
frothy and pale yellow. Put the pan in the oven and allow it to heat
until it is nearly smoking.

At this point, quickly beat the eggs into the cornmeal, then the sour
milk, then pour the entire batter into the pan and set in the oven
quickly. After about 5 minutes, turn the oven down to 400 without
opening the door. Bake for another 25 minutes or so, until the top is
dark, uniform brown. Remove and cool.

This cornbread is delicious eaten warm - simply wait for about
5 minutes or so, until it cools to edible temperature, then cut into
wedges. Or cool all the way if you prefer it at room temperature.


Alex,

This is exactly the way that I and my family (back to grandmother) have
been making cornbread for generations


--snip--

And ours.

Try cooking it in a cast-iron skillet for a wonderful crust.

Here's our family recipe, from Arkansas:

1-1/2 C corn meal (white or yellow)
1 t baking soda
1 t salt
1 egg
2 C buttermilk ("fake" buttermilk, from adding vinegar to fresh milk,
will work too)

Mix thoroughly. The batter will be thin. Important: mix just before the
pan is ready, or the baking soda will be "all foamed out".

In hot oven (400 F), heat heavy pan (I use a cast-iron skillet) with 2 T
bacon fat (anything else is _not_authentic_) until almost smoking. Add
batter and bake until brown. When the bread pulls away from the sides of
the pan, it's probably ready. Test it with a toothpick.

--

For New Year's Day, we always cook up a "mess" of black-eyed peas
(really beans). Don't forget to put a hamhock or a piece of salt pork in
with the peas, and make a pan of cornbread.

To serve, slice a piece of cornbread through the middle and open it up
on the plate. Then spoon the peas over, including as much "juice" as you
like.

Note: Black-eyed peas cook a *lot* faster than most other kinds of dried
beans. A couple or three hours will do it, with *no* pre-soaking. If you
cook them too long, they'll turn to mush.

Isaac





  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2003, 08:16 PM
Dave
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread


"Ronni" wrote in message
...
| I'm looking forward to trying your recipe for corn bread...I just have one
| question....
| Do you have any suggestions for baking with a glass pan? I have the 9 inch
| square and the traditional 'cake' pan in glass, they are both heavy but
not
| near a cast iron weight. Should I do anything different or try a whole
| different recipe? I have never made my own cornbread but would love to. I
| love corn bread and the mixes and store bought jsut isn't what I want in
| cornbread. thanks
|
|

My grandmother baked cornbread in a glass casserole (don't remember the
size) when she stopped frying it in a cast-iron skillet. I remember hers
being loaded down with shortening which bubbled up around the sides when it
came out. It was good, but I liked the fried cornbread patties more. I make
it a bit healthier today in a cast-iron skillet in the oven. I heat the
skillet in the oven to 400 degrees, then pull it out, Pam-coat it, and dump
in my batter (that has flour, cornmeal, yogurt, baking soda, and sugar). It
comes out rather cake-like, but very tasty. It's about 150 calories for
1/8th of a piece, and almost no fat (fat-free yogurt - the Stonyfield Farms
variety). It's very good with honey or plain. Putting the batter in the
greased pan while hot (and greasing it hot) may have something to do with my
bread not sticking. It pops out after 20 minutes baking and is wonderfully
browned on all sides! What is left is great the next day (I like it cold as
well as hot).


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-12-2003, 05:04 AM
Isaac Wingfield
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

In article ,
"Ronni" wrote:

I'm looking forward to trying your recipe for corn bread...I just have one
question....
Do you have any suggestions for baking with a glass pan? I have the 9 inch
square and the traditional 'cake' pan in glass, they are both heavy but not
near a cast iron weight. Should I do anything different or try a whole
different recipe? I have never made my own cornbread but would love to. I
love corn bread and the mixes and store bought jsut isn't what I want in
cornbread. thanks


Sorry, but no, I don't. I have owned two cast iron skillets for so long
I can't remember when I got them; the other two came along later.

You don't need to try a different recipe, but you might need to make
some baking time adjustments to allow for the difference between glass
and iron. Check the stuff with a toothpick and don't overcook it, as
it'll get dry.

You can even make the recipe in a thin aluminum cake pan; you just won't
get as nice a crust on the sides and bottom.

One thing that characterizes "real" southern cornbread is the fact that
it contains no sugar at all; every mix I have ever seen has sugar as an
ingredient.

I've even eaten (that is, *tried* to eat, in northern places),cornbread
with cinnamon in it!

But, you know, you *really should* have at least one cast iron skillet.

Isaac
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-12-2003, 05:12 AM
Isaac Wingfield
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

In article [email protected],
"Dave" wrote:

My grandmother baked cornbread in a glass casserole (don't remember the
size) when she stopped frying it in a cast-iron skillet. I remember hers
being loaded down with shortening which bubbled up around the sides when it
came out. It was good, but I liked the fried cornbread patties more.


I don't know if this is what you are talking about, but here's my
family recipe for:

Scalded Bread

1 1/2 to 2 Cups corn meal (mom used white)
1 teaspoon salt
boiling water
2 to 3 Tablespoons fat for cooking

Pour boiling water into meal until stiff enough to form into cakes with
hands.

Turn on the cold water tap; run hands under water to prevent scalding
yourself, and to prevent the meal from sticking.

Form hand-sized cakes 1/2" to 3/4 " thick.

Put into medium-hot fat (mom would have used bacon drippings), and cook
until they begin to brown; turn and cook other side. (They won't brown
uniformly; don't worry). I don't remember, but suspect cooking time would
be around 10 minutes a side - you want to get the middle cooked.

Serve hot. Slice throught the middle and slather with butter.

Note: these are solid things. They don't rise at all.

Isaac
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-12-2003, 07:35 PM
ME
 
Posts: n/a
Default Recipe : All-corn cornbread

Thanks all...planning to try this weekend...
"Isaac Wingfield" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Ronni" wrote:

I'm looking forward to trying your recipe for corn bread...I just have

one
question....
Do you have any suggestions for baking with a glass pan? I have the 9

inch
square and the traditional 'cake' pan in glass, they are both heavy but

not
near a cast iron weight. Should I do anything different or try a whole
different recipe? I have never made my own cornbread but would love to.

I
love corn bread and the mixes and store bought jsut isn't what I want in
cornbread. thanks


Sorry, but no, I don't. I have owned two cast iron skillets for so long
I can't remember when I got them; the other two came along later.

You don't need to try a different recipe, but you might need to make
some baking time adjustments to allow for the difference between glass
and iron. Check the stuff with a toothpick and don't overcook it, as
it'll get dry.

You can even make the recipe in a thin aluminum cake pan; you just won't
get as nice a crust on the sides and bottom.

One thing that characterizes "real" southern cornbread is the fact that
it contains no sugar at all; every mix I have ever seen has sugar as an
ingredient.

I've even eaten (that is, *tried* to eat, in northern places),cornbread
with cinnamon in it!

But, you know, you *really should* have at least one cast iron skillet.

Isaac





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