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Old 08-11-2004, 01:18 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default Turkey Fryer

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands, and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

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Old 08-11-2004, 01:20 AM
Dave Smith
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands, and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...


I would want to make sure that there was enough power in the thing to maintain a
good hot temperature for something with enough fat in it to do a turkey, plus the
turkey. I just can't see a plug in device doing that. I will leave deep fried
turkey to someone who is brave enough to do it. I have had enough hot fat burns
in my life and known people who have had fat fires. I will stick to the oven for
doing my turkey :-)


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Old 08-11-2004, 01:20 AM
Dave Smith
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands, and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...


I would want to make sure that there was enough power in the thing to maintain a
good hot temperature for something with enough fat in it to do a turkey, plus the
turkey. I just can't see a plug in device doing that. I will leave deep fried
turkey to someone who is brave enough to do it. I have had enough hot fat burns
in my life and known people who have had fat fires. I will stick to the oven for
doing my turkey :-)


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Old 08-11-2004, 01:30 AM
Kenneth
 
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Default

On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:18:15 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands, and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...


Hi Wayne,

I have no idea if it is the same unit that you saw, but the current
Consumer's Reports issue has an electric gadget for frying turkeys and
they explain that it is the first they have seen that they believe to
be sufficiently safe...

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 08-11-2004, 01:30 AM
Kenneth
 
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Default

On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:18:15 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands, and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...


Hi Wayne,

I have no idea if it is the same unit that you saw, but the current
Consumer's Reports issue has an electric gadget for frying turkeys and
they explain that it is the first they have seen that they believe to
be sufficiently safe...

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


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Old 08-11-2004, 01:48 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dave Smith wrote in
:

I would want to make sure that there was enough power in the thing to
maintain a good hot temperature for something with enough fat in it to
do a turkey, plus the turkey. I just can't see a plug in device doing
that. I will leave deep fried turkey to someone who is brave enough to
do it. I have had enough hot fat burns in my life and known people who
have had fat fires. I will stick to the oven for doing my turkey :-)


My sentiments as well. I'm afraid of the propane contraptions and heavy pots
on poorly balanced on a frame. Even with the electric unit there sufficient
hot fat to produce severe burns if anything went wrong.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 08-11-2004, 01:48 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dave Smith wrote in
:

I would want to make sure that there was enough power in the thing to
maintain a good hot temperature for something with enough fat in it to
do a turkey, plus the turkey. I just can't see a plug in device doing
that. I will leave deep fried turkey to someone who is brave enough to
do it. I have had enough hot fat burns in my life and known people who
have had fat fires. I will stick to the oven for doing my turkey :-)


My sentiments as well. I'm afraid of the propane contraptions and heavy pots
on poorly balanced on a frame. Even with the electric unit there sufficient
hot fat to produce severe burns if anything went wrong.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 08-11-2004, 01:48 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dave Smith wrote in
:

I would want to make sure that there was enough power in the thing to
maintain a good hot temperature for something with enough fat in it to
do a turkey, plus the turkey. I just can't see a plug in device doing
that. I will leave deep fried turkey to someone who is brave enough to
do it. I have had enough hot fat burns in my life and known people who
have had fat fires. I will stick to the oven for doing my turkey :-)


My sentiments as well. I'm afraid of the propane contraptions and heavy pots
on poorly balanced on a frame. Even with the electric unit there sufficient
hot fat to produce severe burns if anything went wrong.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 08-11-2004, 01:50 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kenneth wrote in
:

Hi Wayne,

I have no idea if it is the same unit that you saw, but the current
Consumer's Reports issue has an electric gadget for frying turkeys and
they explain that it is the first they have seen that they believe to
be sufficiently safe...

All the best,


More than likely it's the same unit. I doubt there would be many new
electrics out all at the same time. I'm sure it would be much safer than the
propane burner, stand, and pot. Still, that much hot grease is a hazard I
don't want to risk.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
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Old 08-11-2004, 01:50 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kenneth wrote in
:

Hi Wayne,

I have no idea if it is the same unit that you saw, but the current
Consumer's Reports issue has an electric gadget for frying turkeys and
they explain that it is the first they have seen that they believe to
be sufficiently safe...

All the best,


More than likely it's the same unit. I doubt there would be many new
electrics out all at the same time. I'm sure it would be much safer than the
propane burner, stand, and pot. Still, that much hot grease is a hazard I
don't want to risk.

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


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Old 08-11-2004, 02:42 AM
Bill
 
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Default

On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:18:15 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands, and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...



Hey Wayne!
I bought one of those propane fired turkey fryers last year. If you
respect the danger involved in using it...it's ok. You need to set it
up outdoors on a surface that won't be bothered if you spill 375
degree oil onto it. You basically get that peanut oil up to about 375
degrees fahrenheit and deep fry the turkey. Before you heat the oil,
put the turkey in the pot and fill it with water up to about three
inches from the top, then take the turkey out and see where the water
level is...this is how high you want to fill the pot with
oil...otherwise you may cause the oil to run over the sides of the pot
when you drop the turkey in to cook. If you set it up on your patio or
driveway...put several layers of newspaper under the pot to absorb the
oil you spill when lifting the bird out of the hot oil.

I thought the cooked turkey was delicious...much more moist and juicy
than alot of traditionally oven baked turkeys I have had in the past.

Regards,
Bill
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Old 08-11-2004, 02:42 AM
Bill
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:18:15 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands, and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...



Hey Wayne!
I bought one of those propane fired turkey fryers last year. If you
respect the danger involved in using it...it's ok. You need to set it
up outdoors on a surface that won't be bothered if you spill 375
degree oil onto it. You basically get that peanut oil up to about 375
degrees fahrenheit and deep fry the turkey. Before you heat the oil,
put the turkey in the pot and fill it with water up to about three
inches from the top, then take the turkey out and see where the water
level is...this is how high you want to fill the pot with
oil...otherwise you may cause the oil to run over the sides of the pot
when you drop the turkey in to cook. If you set it up on your patio or
driveway...put several layers of newspaper under the pot to absorb the
oil you spill when lifting the bird out of the hot oil.

I thought the cooked turkey was delicious...much more moist and juicy
than alot of traditionally oven baked turkeys I have had in the past.

Regards,
Bill
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Old 08-11-2004, 03:02 AM
MJ
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I had deep fried turkey a couple of times in the past couple of years (i
have never cooked it myself but done by relatives). It was the best turkey i
have ever had..so moist and juicy. The only draw back is..no gravy... and
if you can get past the idea of how bad the peanut oil is for you. Other
than that i would choose deep fried over oven cooked in a minute

"Bill" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:18:15 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around

the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands,

and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons

of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look

at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit

and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...



Hey Wayne!
I bought one of those propane fired turkey fryers last year. If you
respect the danger involved in using it...it's ok. You need to set it
up outdoors on a surface that won't be bothered if you spill 375
degree oil onto it. You basically get that peanut oil up to about 375
degrees fahrenheit and deep fry the turkey. Before you heat the oil,
put the turkey in the pot and fill it with water up to about three
inches from the top, then take the turkey out and see where the water
level is...this is how high you want to fill the pot with
oil...otherwise you may cause the oil to run over the sides of the pot
when you drop the turkey in to cook. If you set it up on your patio or
driveway...put several layers of newspaper under the pot to absorb the
oil you spill when lifting the bird out of the hot oil.

I thought the cooked turkey was delicious...much more moist and juicy
than alot of traditionally oven baked turkeys I have had in the past.

Regards,
Bill



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Old 08-11-2004, 03:02 AM
MJ
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I had deep fried turkey a couple of times in the past couple of years (i
have never cooked it myself but done by relatives). It was the best turkey i
have ever had..so moist and juicy. The only draw back is..no gravy... and
if you can get past the idea of how bad the peanut oil is for you. Other
than that i would choose deep fried over oven cooked in a minute

"Bill" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 01:18:15 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

For years I've read about deep frying whole turkeys, especially around

the
holidays, and seen various propane contraptions with the burners, stands,

and
pots, none of which seemed safe enough to handle when filled with gallons

of
oil and a heavy turkey.

Today at Walmart, amidst all the propane paraphernalia, I saw an electric
turkey fryer which would seem much safer than the propane. I didn't look

at
in detail since I don't plan to buy one. It was a large one-piece unit

and
had a hinged lid and, of course, temperature control on the front.
Interesting...



Hey Wayne!
I bought one of those propane fired turkey fryers last year. If you
respect the danger involved in using it...it's ok. You need to set it
up outdoors on a surface that won't be bothered if you spill 375
degree oil onto it. You basically get that peanut oil up to about 375
degrees fahrenheit and deep fry the turkey. Before you heat the oil,
put the turkey in the pot and fill it with water up to about three
inches from the top, then take the turkey out and see where the water
level is...this is how high you want to fill the pot with
oil...otherwise you may cause the oil to run over the sides of the pot
when you drop the turkey in to cook. If you set it up on your patio or
driveway...put several layers of newspaper under the pot to absorb the
oil you spill when lifting the bird out of the hot oil.

I thought the cooked turkey was delicious...much more moist and juicy
than alot of traditionally oven baked turkeys I have had in the past.

Regards,
Bill



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Old 08-11-2004, 03:21 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bill wrote in
:

Hey Wayne!
I bought one of those propane fired turkey fryers last year. If you
respect the danger involved in using it...it's ok. You need to set it
up outdoors on a surface that won't be bothered if you spill 375
degree oil onto it. You basically get that peanut oil up to about 375
degrees fahrenheit and deep fry the turkey. Before you heat the oil,
put the turkey in the pot and fill it with water up to about three
inches from the top, then take the turkey out and see where the water
level is...this is how high you want to fill the pot with
oil...otherwise you may cause the oil to run over the sides of the pot
when you drop the turkey in to cook. If you set it up on your patio or
driveway...put several layers of newspaper under the pot to absorb the
oil you spill when lifting the bird out of the hot oil.

I thought the cooked turkey was delicious...much more moist and juicy
than alot of traditionally oven baked turkeys I have had in the past.

Regards,
Bill


Hi Bill!
I've eaten deep fried turkey a couple of times at friends and I have to
agree that it's delicious. Having been burned badly by a coking fire once
as a child, however, I think I'm still too leary of attempting this myself.
I'll defer to the experts. g

All great tips that you provided, though. Thanks!

--
Wayne in Phoenix

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.


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