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Old 02-04-2013, 04:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.

I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.




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Old 02-04-2013, 04:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

On 4/2/2013 11:01 AM, Kalmia wrote:
I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.

I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.



Just how strong is "simple syrup" since supersaturated sugar solutions
don't deposit excess crystals quickly?

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Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
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Old 02-04-2013, 06:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

Kalmia wrote:

I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.

I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.


What I usually call "simple" syrup is equal parts sugar and water -
you'll need a much higher concentration of sugar to substitute for corn
syrup.

There are plenty of syrup substitute formulas on the Internet, e.g., I
found this by Googling "corn syrup substitute"

http://www.tasteofhome.com/cooking-t...for-corn-syrup

The recommendation is 4 parts sugar (or brown sugar) to 1 part water and
the resulting volume is equal to the amount of sugar you use, e.g., a
cup of sugar and a quarter-cup of water yields a cup of corn syrup
substitute.

You'll notice that no mention is made of heating or cooking it
separately - the need for this varies by the recipe but I believe, for
brownies or other baked goods, you're OK not to heat your syrup
substitute first, just stir the two ingredients together and add as
directed by your recipe. For making a simple syrup you can store in a
bottle, you'll need to heat it until the sugar is dissolved the liquid
clear and for some purposes you'll need to heat it even more before
cooling and storing.

-S-


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Old 02-04-2013, 06:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

On 02/04/2013 11:01 AM, Kalmia wrote:
I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.

I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.



You probably don't use it any less than I do. I have a small plastic
bottle of the stuff that has been in the cupboard for years. I
occasionally check on it and am always surprised to see that it has not
turned into a science project. It's not expensive, or it wasn't when I
last bought it. It could be 5 times that price by now.
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Old 02-04-2013, 07:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

On Tue, 02 Apr 2013 13:20:02 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 02/04/2013 11:01 AM, Kalmia wrote:
I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.

I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.



You probably don't use it any less than I do. I have a small plastic
bottle of the stuff that has been in the cupboard for years. I
occasionally check on it and am always surprised to see that it has not
turned into a science project. It's not expensive, or it wasn't when I
last bought it. It could be 5 times that price by now.


Mine has lasted forever too. I still have a glass bottle with the old
ingredients, as does Jill.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


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Old 02-04-2013, 09:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

On Tue, 02 Apr 2013 13:20:02 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 02/04/2013 11:01 AM, Kalmia wrote:
I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.

I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.



You probably don't use it any less than I do. I have a small plastic
bottle of the stuff that has been in the cupboard for years. I
occasionally check on it and am always surprised to see that it has not
turned into a science project. It's not expensive, or it wasn't when I
last bought it. It could be 5 times that price by now.


A 16 oz bottle of karo syrup sells for like $7... it'll keep in the
cupboard about as long as honey.
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Old 02-04-2013, 10:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

On Apr 2, 11:01*am, Kalmia wrote:
I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.

I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.


Even if you got the simple syrup down to the consistancy of corn
syrup, it won't be the same. They're chemically different and
therefore the way they behave when it comes to cooking, baking, and
candy making will be different too.
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Old 02-04-2013, 10:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

On Apr 2, 5:07*pm, " wrote:
On Apr 2, 11:01*am, Kalmia wrote:

I use corn syrup so rarely, I'd rather just make a small batch of s.s.


I mainly use it in a brownie recipe.


Even if you got the simple syrup down to the consistancy of corn
syrup, it won't be the same. *They're chemically different and
therefore the way they behave when it comes to cooking, baking, and
candy making will be different too.


I just realized I started a thread in this vein called "You reach for
your bottle of corn syrup......" about a month ago.

I shouldn't be obsessed with corn syrup runout, considering the little
it costs and the little I use. I sure am not going to have a spare on
hand tho.

I'll forget about making my own substitute, I guess.
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Would my own simple syrup sub OK for corn syrup?

Brooklyn1 wrote:

On Tue, 02 Apr 2013 13:20:02 -0400, Dave Smith
wrote:

You probably don't use it any less than I do. I have a small plastic
bottle of the stuff that has been in the cupboard for years. I
occasionally check on it and am always surprised to see that it has not
turned into a science project. It's not expensive, or it wasn't when I
last bought it. It could be 5 times that price by now.


A 16 oz bottle of karo syrup sells for like $7... it'll keep in the
cupboard about as long as honey.


As long as it's kept capped, either one will keep
indefinitely. If uncapped, either one will absorb
water from the air and eventually become dilute
enough to support mold and yeast. I think the
critical water content is somewhere around 18%.


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