General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-05-2010, 09:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 28
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

Seems like everywhere I go these days, they are offering scones and
they are often quite different, varying from bready to cake to almost
a cookie. And almost all scones are very sweet and served plain.
Rarely do i find a biscuity scone, which is what I most associate to a
scone (served with Devon cream and/or jam).

So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
to be"?


thx
-goro-

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-05-2010, 09:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 941
Default Scones : What should the texture be?


"Goro" wrote in message
...
| Seems like everywhere I go these days, they are offering scones and
| they are often quite different, varying from bready to cake to almost
| a cookie. And almost all scones are very sweet and served plain.
| Rarely do i find a biscuity scone, which is what I most associate to a
| scone (served with Devon cream and/or jam).
|
| So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
| to be"?

Exactly as you said, biscuity and served with Devon cream, butter,
Wilkins Little Scarlet preserves, Fortnum's Scottish Heather Honey
and Cooper's Vintage Orange Marmalade.

pavane


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 12:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Scones : What should the texture be?



Goro wrote:

Seems like everywhere I go these days, they are offering scones and
they are often quite different, varying from bready to cake to almost
a cookie. And almost all scones are very sweet and served plain.
Rarely do i find a biscuity scone, which is what I most associate to a
scone (served with Devon cream and/or jam).

So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
to be"?

thx
-goro-


Scones shouldn't be as soft and doughy as the average American biscuit;
it has a more substantial crumb. A good scone won't be the least bit
'cake'-like and certainly nothing like a 'cookie'. Doesn't need to be
particularly sweet either, although it's common enough.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 01:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1,254
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

On May 12, 7:46*pm, brooklyn1 wrote:
Goro wrote:

So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
to be"?



Didn't see anything of value EVER contributed....no recipes...no
interesting commentary.... YOU remain a buffoon. Do you really
believe you are adding interesting cook chat? You add NOTHING of
value.





  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 03:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 946
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

On May 12, 4:05*pm, Goro wrote:
Seems like everywhere I go these days, they are offering scones and
they are often quite different, varying from bready to cake to almost
a cookie. * And almost all scones are very sweet and served plain.
Rarely do i find a biscuity scone, which is what I most associate to a
scone (served with Devon cream and/or jam).

So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
to be"?

thx
-goro-


Slightly crumbly, yet still a little moist. *Not* dry, or cake-y.

IMHO,
Kris


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 08:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,661
Default Scones : What should the texture be?



"Goro" wrote in message
...
Seems like everywhere I go these days, they are offering scones and
they are often quite different, varying from bready to cake to almost
a cookie. And almost all scones are very sweet and served plain.
Rarely do i find a biscuity scone, which is what I most associate to a
scone (served with Devon cream and/or jam).

So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
to be"?


My recipe if it is any help:

Rich Fruit Scones

8oz SR flour
half teasp salt
1 ½ oz lard
1 tablesp sugar
2 tablesp currants or sultanas
1 egg. (best but put aside one tablesp for tops)
Milk to make a soft dough

Mid the flour and salt in basin and rub the butter with the finger tips
until it looks like breadcrumbs. Mix in the sugar and the currants. Then
stir in with knife enough beaten egg and milk to make a soft dough.

Handle very gently. Pat out gently into a round about half and inch thick
and cut out shapes preferred

Place on greased baking sheet and brush over the tops with the beaten egg.
Bake in hot oven 425o- 450 F about 10 minutes


Instead of fruit you may make them plain or with grated cheese


--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 09:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 11,045
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

Ophelia wrote:

My recipe if it is any help:

snip scone recipe

Instead of fruit you may make them plain or with grated cheese


I bet they'd be good with bacon baked into them.

Bob
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 11:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,661
Default Scones : What should the texture be?



"Bob Terwilliger" wrote in message
...
Ophelia wrote:

My recipe if it is any help:

snip scone recipe

Instead of fruit you may make them plain or with grated cheese


I bet they'd be good with bacon baked into them.


Yep! The basic recipe as written is that which my Grandmother made. I have
made quite a lot of different ones over the years.

However, whichever ones you make, MUST be eaten absolutely fresh. The
recipe I have given is heavenly fresh from the oven with plenty of butter
--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 06:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
gtr gtr is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,139
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

On 2010-05-12 17:17:00 -0700, Mr. Bill said:

On May 12, 7:46*pm, brooklyn1 wrote:

[ brooklyn1's contribution: a link to a image of tits. ]


Didn't see anything of value EVER contributed....no recipes...no
interesting commentary.... YOU remain a buffoon. Do you really
believe you are adding interesting cook chat? You add NOTHING of
value.


He provides value in the negative. When he participates, there is the
scent of fart on the breeze.

Another asshole meets my killfile.

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-05-2010, 11:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 28
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

On May 13, 12:16*am, "Ophelia" wrote:
"Goro" wrote in message

...

Seems like everywhere I go these days, they are offering scones and
they are often quite different, varying from bready to cake to almost
a cookie. * And almost all scones are very sweet and served plain.
Rarely do i find a biscuity scone, which is what I most associate to a
scone (served with Devon cream and/or jam).


So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
to be"?


My recipe if it is any help:

Rich Fruit Scones

8oz SR flour
half teasp salt
1 ½ oz lard
1 tablesp sugar
2 tablesp currants or sultanas
1 egg. (best but put aside one tablesp for tops)
Milk to make a soft dough

Mid the flour and salt in basin and rub the butter with the finger tips
until it looks like breadcrumbs. *Mix in the sugar and the currants. *Then
stir in with knife enough beaten egg and milk to make a soft dough.

Handle very gently. *Pat out gently into a round about half and inch thick
and cut out shapes preferred

Place on greased baking sheet and brush over the tops with the beaten egg..
Bake in hot oven 425o- 450 F about 10 minutes

Instead of fruit you may make them plain or with grated cheese


similar to my recipe except butter instead of lard and no egg.

-goro-


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-05-2010, 12:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 33,207
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

Ranee at Arabian Knits wrote:
In article , Arri London
wrote:

Scones shouldn't be as soft and doughy as the average American biscuit;


I've never had soft and doughy biscuits unless they came from a can.
Homemade biscuits are flaky.


It depends on how you bake them. If you set them on a baking sheet so
they are nor touching they will be flaky. If you lay them out so they
are touching each other they will be doughy instead of flaky.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-05-2010, 12:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Scones : What should the texture be?



Ranee at Arabian Knits wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Scones shouldn't be as soft and doughy as the average American biscuit;


I've never had soft and doughy biscuits unless they came from a can.
Homemade biscuits are flaky.

Regards,
Ranee @ Arabian Knits



Never have I had a *flaky* biscuit all through the South. So no one down
there knows how to make a biscuit properly?
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-05-2010, 12:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,178
Default Scones : What should the texture be?



Ranee at Arabian Knits wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Ranee at Arabian Knits wrote:

In article , Arri London
wrote:

Scones shouldn't be as soft and doughy as the average American biscuit;

I've never had soft and doughy biscuits unless they came from a can.
Homemade biscuits are flaky.


Never have I had a *flaky* biscuit all through the South. So no one down
there knows how to make a biscuit properly?


Not to my taste! I ate biscuits in OK, and they weren't doughy
either, but flaky, maybe heading toward crumbly. I haven't traveled
extensively in the south, however. If doughy is a standard southern
biscuit, then I wouldn't like it at all.



We may also be talking at cross purposes. Flaky, to me, means along the
lines of good pie crust. Plus flaky and crumbly are unrelated, in my
mind map. Of course, OK isn't the South anyway Don't think I ever had
biscuits there.
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-05-2010, 01:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 33,207
Default Scones : What should the texture be?

Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:


It depends on how you bake them. If you set them on a baking sheet so
they are nor touching they will be flaky. If you lay them out so they
are touching each other they will be doughy instead of flaky.


Are there people who like them doughy? I cannot imagine. It's one
of the reasons I don't like the canned ones.


There must be some people whop like them that way. The recipe that we
use specifies spacing them on the pan or to have them touching,
depending in whether you want them flaky or soft. I prefer them flaky.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-05-2010, 10:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 5,661
Default Scones : What should the texture be?



"Goro" wrote in message
...
On May 13, 12:16 am, "Ophelia" wrote:
"Goro" wrote in message

...

Seems like everywhere I go these days, they are offering scones and
they are often quite different, varying from bready to cake to almost
a cookie. And almost all scones are very sweet and served plain.
Rarely do i find a biscuity scone, which is what I most associate to a
scone (served with Devon cream and/or jam).


So, what do most people here consider as the "way scones are supposed
to be"?


My recipe if it is any help:

Rich Fruit Scones

8oz SR flour
half teasp salt
1 ½ oz lard
1 tablesp sugar
2 tablesp currants or sultanas
1 egg. (best but put aside one tablesp for tops)
Milk to make a soft dough

Mid the flour and salt in basin and rub the butter with the finger tips
until it looks like breadcrumbs. Mix in the sugar and the currants.
Then
stir in with knife enough beaten egg and milk to make a soft dough.

Handle very gently. Pat out gently into a round about half and inch
thick
and cut out shapes preferred

Place on greased baking sheet and brush over the tops with the beaten
egg.
Bake in hot oven 425o- 450 F about 10 minutes

Instead of fruit you may make them plain or with grated cheese


similar to my recipe except butter instead of lard and no egg.


)

--
--
https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pancake texture Ed Pawlowski[_2_] General Cooking 3 26-11-2010 12:30 PM
Pancake texture sf[_9_] General Cooking 7 26-11-2010 03:45 AM
Pancake texture Chris Nelson General Cooking 0 26-11-2010 03:12 AM
Pancake texture Tracy General Cooking 1 26-11-2010 02:45 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:27 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2020 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017