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Old 04-05-2009, 08:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)


Sea salt, obtained by evaporating seawater, is used in cooking and
cosmetics. Historically called bay salt, its mineral content gives it
a different taste than table salt. Kosher salt is one of the most
commonly used varieties of edible salt in commercial kitchens today.
Kosher salt has a much larger grain size than regular table salt, and
a more open granular structure.

Kosher salt gets its name not because it follows the guidelines for
kosher foods as written in the Torah but because of its use in making
meats kosher, by helping to extract the blood from the meat.

Both consist of the chemical compound sodium chloride.

Kosher salt is characterized by its big crystals with large surface
areas. The crystals in sea salt are not as big as kosher salt and are
in pyramid shape. Kosher salt's size and shape allows it to absorb
more moisture than other forms of salt.

Kosher salt is made by evaporation process. However, some processes
allow their crystals to grow at normal atmospheric pressure which
makes a different shaped and larger crystal possible. In other
manufacturing processes, Kosher Salt is made by compressing table salt
crystals under pressure and then sizing the resulting agglomerates to
yield a coarse-type salt. Sea salt is produced by evaporation of sea
water at atmospheric temperature and pressure. The crystals tend to
form inverted pyramid shapes not all that different from Kosher Salt
produced at atmospheric pressure referred to in the first paragraph.
Depending upon the geographic location, altitude, and composition of
the salt ponds from which the salt originates, the salt may take on
certain colors representing some of the trace minerals in the area.

Sea salt and kosher salt possess large, irregular grains that add a
delightful crunch and hit of briny flavor when sprinkled on food at
the last minute. Generally, savvy cooks prefer kosher salt when
cooking, since its coarse texture is easier to take a pinch of when
seasoning savory dishes. Kosher salt is used for curing meats and also
for baking with recipes that use small amounts of liquid. Sea salt is
also used in cosmetics.


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Old 04-05-2009, 08:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

wrote on Mon, 04 May 2009 14:27:03 -0500:

wrote on Mon, 04 May 2009 14:07:13 -0500:

Kosher salt gets its name not because it follows the
guidelines for kosher foods as written in the Torah but
because of its use in making meats kosher, by helping to
extract the blood from the meat.


I also would like to see the last word on this topic and
there is only one mystery unsolved, which is why the makers
of "Kosher Salt" use the various rabbinical certification
symbols?


http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php

I see! A manufacturer who thinks that certification might be valuable
has to request it and so the symbols on a Morton package will have been
obtained in that fashion.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Old 04-05-2009, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)



Reference, por favor?

Last word.
--
mad


On Mon, 04 May 2009 14:07:13 -0500, wrote:


Sea salt, obtained by evaporating seawater, is used in cooking and
cosmetics. Historically called bay salt, its mineral content gives it
a different taste than table salt. Kosher salt is one of the most
commonly used varieties of edible salt in commercial kitchens today.
Kosher salt has a much larger grain size than regular table salt, and
a more open granular structure.

Kosher salt gets its name not because it follows the guidelines for
kosher foods as written in the Torah but because of its use in making
meats kosher, by helping to extract the blood from the meat.

Both consist of the chemical compound sodium chloride.

Kosher salt is characterized by its big crystals with large surface
areas. The crystals in sea salt are not as big as kosher salt and are
in pyramid shape. Kosher salt's size and shape allows it to absorb
more moisture than other forms of salt.

Kosher salt is made by evaporation process. However, some processes
allow their crystals to grow at normal atmospheric pressure which
makes a different shaped and larger crystal possible. In other
manufacturing processes, Kosher Salt is made by compressing table salt
crystals under pressure and then sizing the resulting agglomerates to
yield a coarse-type salt. Sea salt is produced by evaporation of sea
water at atmospheric temperature and pressure. The crystals tend to
form inverted pyramid shapes not all that different from Kosher Salt
produced at atmospheric pressure referred to in the first paragraph.
Depending upon the geographic location, altitude, and composition of
the salt ponds from which the salt originates, the salt may take on
certain colors representing some of the trace minerals in the area.

Sea salt and kosher salt possess large, irregular grains that add a
delightful crunch and hit of briny flavor when sprinkled on food at
the last minute. Generally, savvy cooks prefer kosher salt when
cooking, since its coarse texture is easier to take a pinch of when
seasoning savory dishes. Kosher salt is used for curing meats and also
for baking with recipes that use small amounts of liquid. Sea salt is
also used in cosmetics.



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Old 04-05-2009, 09:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)


wrote in message
...

Sea salt, obtained by evaporating seawater,


You haven't a clue... ALL salt is the result of evaporated sea water...
mined salt was once a sea, then dried up, the water evaporated. But "sea
salt" is NOT a result of evaporating sea water... sea salt is a naturally
occuring phenomena... it's salt that floats to the surface by becoming
attached to foreign schmutz that floats... it forms on schmutz kinda like
how sugar forms on a string to become rock candy.

I snipped all the rest of your post because none of that was factual either.

BTW, the product marketed as "Sea Salt" is NOT kosher... it's skimmed along
with plant and *animal* parts. Sea salt is not pure salt in that it also
contains many minerals/elements that in of themselves are kosher but are not
necessarilly safe for folks to ingest on a regular basis.. one should always
query their medical professional about the use of sea salt... many
prescription medicines react badly when sea salt is introduced into the
body, and medical doctors will typically rule out sea salt for
pregnant/nursing women. But it's not the natuarilly occuring elements in
sea salt that renders it non-kosher, it's the non-kosher animals and animal
parts (excretia) it contains. Sea salt is very different from mined salt
and solar evaporated salt


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Old 04-05-2009, 10:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

Here's what you do, pop over to the Jewish site in the original post
you conveniently snipped apart. That's where I got the info from and
you can tell them they don't have a clue.

I incase you can't find it, here it is again
http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php tells how it works out.




--------------------------------


On Mon, 04 May 2009 20:28:45 GMT, "brooklyn1"
wrote:


wrote in message
.. .

Sea salt, obtained by evaporating seawater,


You haven't a clue... ALL salt is the result of evaporated sea water...
mined salt was once a sea, then dried up, the water evaporated. But "sea
salt" is NOT a result of evaporating sea water... sea salt is a naturally
occuring phenomena... it's salt that floats to the surface by becoming
attached to foreign schmutz that floats... it forms on schmutz kinda like
how sugar forms on a string to become rock candy.

I snipped all the rest of your post because none of that was factual either.

BTW, the product marketed as "Sea Salt" is NOT kosher... it's skimmed along
with plant and *animal* parts. Sea salt is not pure salt in that it also
contains many minerals/elements that in of themselves are kosher but are not
necessarilly safe for folks to ingest on a regular basis.. one should always
query their medical professional about the use of sea salt... many
prescription medicines react badly when sea salt is introduced into the
body, and medical doctors will typically rule out sea salt for
pregnant/nursing women. But it's not the natuarilly occuring elements in
sea salt that renders it non-kosher, it's the non-kosher animals and animal
parts (excretia) it contains. Sea salt is very different from mined salt
and solar evaporated salt

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Old 04-05-2009, 10:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

On Mon, 04 May 2009 12:46:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:



Reference, por favor?

Last word.



http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php
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Old 04-05-2009, 11:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

On Mon, 04 May 2009 16:45:50 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 12:46:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:



Reference, por favor?

Last word.



http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php


Okay, I thought it might be different from the one you posted. Not
necessary for the newsgroup, I guess, but who is this guy? Is he the
definitive answer?

Best to trust sources such as Encyclopedia Britannica, but he seems to
know what he's talking about.

That's what was meant by "Question Authority" in the 1960s and '70's,
but an entire generation got it wrong.
--
mad
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Old 04-05-2009, 11:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:18:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 16:45:50 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 12:46:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:



Reference, por favor?

Last word.



http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php


Okay, I thought it might be different from the one you posted. Not
necessary for the newsgroup, I guess, but who is this guy? Is he the
definitive answer?

Best to trust sources such as Encyclopedia Britannica, but he seems to
know what he's talking about.

That's what was meant by "Question Authority" in the 1960s and '70's,
but an entire generation got it wrong.



Oh I don't know about that, I was at woodstock, seems our generation
sure knew how to Party


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Old 04-05-2009, 11:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

On Mon, 04 May 2009 17:22:01 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:18:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 16:45:50 -0500,
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 12:46:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:



Reference, por favor?

Last word.


http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php


Okay, I thought it might be different from the one you posted. Not
necessary for the newsgroup, I guess, but who is this guy? Is he the
definitive answer?

Best to trust sources such as Encyclopedia Britannica, but he seems to
know what he's talking about.

That's what was meant by "Question Authority" in the 1960s and '70's,
but an entire generation got it wrong.



Oh I don't know about that, I was at woodstock, seems our generation
sure knew how to Party


I think I was at Tan Son Nhut under my bed.

I heard recently that Woodstock wasn't such a magical carpet ride.

Drug ODs, rain, sanitation, crowding. I never really cared for live
performances, either. Only one I ever saw was the Beach Boys in
Allentown, PA.
--
mad
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Old 04-05-2009, 11:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:34:16 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 17:22:01 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:18:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 16:45:50 -0500,
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 12:46:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:



Reference, por favor?

Last word.


http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php


Okay, I thought it might be different from the one you posted. Not
necessary for the newsgroup, I guess, but who is this guy? Is he the
definitive answer?

Best to trust sources such as Encyclopedia Britannica, but he seems to
know what he's talking about.

That's what was meant by "Question Authority" in the 1960s and '70's,
but an entire generation got it wrong.



Oh I don't know about that, I was at woodstock, seems our generation
sure knew how to Party


I think I was at Tan Son Nhut under my bed.

I heard recently that Woodstock wasn't such a magical carpet ride.

Drug ODs, rain, sanitation, crowding. I never really cared for live
performances, either. Only one I ever saw was the Beach Boys in
Allentown, PA.



Alot naked and sliding in the mud (remember I was 19), the drugs
weren't as bad as they say it was, the sanitation was another
matter....after all this all happened a farmers field with 400,000
people.

I've seen the Beach Boys live as well as the Who and Animals.

Jimmy Hedrix, Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker and Joan Baez were the leaders
of the generation.
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Old 05-05-2009, 12:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 609
Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

On Mon, 04 May 2009 17:58:15 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:34:16 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 17:22:01 -0500,
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:18:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 16:45:50 -0500,
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 12:46:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:



Reference, por favor?

Last word.


http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php


Okay, I thought it might be different from the one you posted. Not
necessary for the newsgroup, I guess, but who is this guy? Is he the
definitive answer?

Best to trust sources such as Encyclopedia Britannica, but he seems to
know what he's talking about.

That's what was meant by "Question Authority" in the 1960s and '70's,
but an entire generation got it wrong.


Oh I don't know about that, I was at woodstock, seems our generation
sure knew how to Party


I think I was at Tan Son Nhut under my bed.

I heard recently that Woodstock wasn't such a magical carpet ride.

Drug ODs, rain, sanitation, crowding. I never really cared for live
performances, either. Only one I ever saw was the Beach Boys in
Allentown, PA.



Alot naked and sliding in the mud (remember I was 19), the drugs
weren't as bad as they say it was, the sanitation was another
matter....after all this all happened a farmers field with 400,000
people.


I got the naked people after my excursion into naturism in the early
'70s.

I've seen the Beach Boys live as well as the Who and Animals.


All my others were classical (in the general sense of the word).
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, HMS Pinafore, Liberace.

I saw Pavarotti in Pittsburgh, but he might as well have been an ant
on a bedsheet.

Jimmy Hedrix, Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker and Joan Baez were the leaders
of the generation.


I was born twenty miles from Liverpool. Need I say more?
--
mad
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Old 05-05-2009, 12:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,885
Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

In article ,
"James Silverton" wrote:

I see! A manufacturer who thinks that certification might be valuable
has to request it and so the symbols on a Morton package will have been
obtained in that fashion.


I worked in an aerosol factory from the early to mid seventies. We were
a contract packager and obtained a contract for PAM. PAM had to be
kosher and we were visited by a rabbi who looked over our operation,
method and formula for PAM and made us kosher for the PAM only part of
our operation. We were required to have a separate line from our mixing
tank to the filler for PAM only.

leo
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Old 05-05-2009, 01:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 389
Default Hopefully last word on Kosher Salt (difference between Sea Salt and Kosher)

On Mon, 04 May 2009 16:09:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 17:58:15 -0500, wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:34:16 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 17:22:01 -0500,
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 15:18:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 16:45:50 -0500,
wrote:

On Mon, 04 May 2009 12:46:05 -0700, Mack A. Damia
wrote:



Reference, por favor?

Last word.


http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php


Okay, I thought it might be different from the one you posted. Not
necessary for the newsgroup, I guess, but who is this guy? Is he the
definitive answer?

Best to trust sources such as Encyclopedia Britannica, but he seems to
know what he's talking about.

That's what was meant by "Question Authority" in the 1960s and '70's,
but an entire generation got it wrong.


Oh I don't know about that, I was at woodstock, seems our generation
sure knew how to Party

I think I was at Tan Son Nhut under my bed.

I heard recently that Woodstock wasn't such a magical carpet ride.

Drug ODs, rain, sanitation, crowding. I never really cared for live
performances, either. Only one I ever saw was the Beach Boys in
Allentown, PA.



Alot naked and sliding in the mud (remember I was 19), the drugs
weren't as bad as they say it was, the sanitation was another
matter....after all this all happened a farmers field with 400,000
people.


I got the naked people after my excursion into naturism in the early
'70s.

I've seen the Beach Boys live as well as the Who and Animals.


All my others were classical (in the general sense of the word).
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, HMS Pinafore, Liberace.

I saw Pavarotti in Pittsburgh, but he might as well have been an ant
on a bedsheet.

Jimmy Hedrix, Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker and Joan Baez were the leaders
of the generation.


I was born twenty miles from Liverpool. Need I say more?


Cool, were you a Mod or a Rocker


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