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Old 19-10-2003, 02:02 PM
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"


I just finished reading the "nutrition" article in TIME magazine.
They've convinced me;
Reduce sugars, rice, processed flours etc,
and eat more "Whole Grains".

They even gave a hint; "Barley is a whole grain"

But when I go to my grocers, what should I be looking for ?
I don't just want to buy a bag of whole-wheat flour.

Is Grits a whole grain ? Raisin Bran ? Oat meal ?
( these all sound like breakfast foods )

Any help here on which prepared foods are "whole grain" ?


rj

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Old 19-10-2003, 02:29 PM
Curly Sue
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 09:02:59 -0400, "RJ"
wrote:


I just finished reading the "nutrition" article in TIME magazine.


It is a pretty good article. I saw the article on the cnn.com website
(under "Time Magazine") and went out and bought the issue.

They've convinced me;
Reduce sugars, rice, processed flours etc,
and eat more "Whole Grains".

They even gave a hint; "Barley is a whole grain"

But when I go to my grocers, what should I be looking for ?
I don't just want to buy a bag of whole-wheat flour.

Is Grits a whole grain ?

Interesting question. The answer is no, as I found out he
http://www.mycustompak.com/healthNot...Guide/Corn.htm

Raisin Bran?

Well, it contains "bran" which technically isn't a whole grain but
practically-speaking it is the part of the grain that "whole grain" is
supposed to keep. So, that works as a "whole grain" for your
purposes.

Oat meal ?

Yes.

( these all sound like breakfast foods )


brown rice too :

Any help here on which prepared foods are "whole grain" ?


Look for packages that say "whole wheat" or "whole grain _____".
Here are a couple of guides:
http://www.cspinet.org/nah/wwheat.html
http://www.mycustompak.com/healthNot...-Contents-List
(this one is nice, it has photos)

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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Old 19-10-2003, 03:33 PM
jmcquown
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

Curly Sue wrote:
On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 09:02:59 -0400, "RJ"
wrote:


I just finished reading the "nutrition" article in TIME magazine.


It is a pretty good article. I saw the article on the cnn.com website
(under "Time Magazine") and went out and bought the issue.

They've convinced me;
Reduce sugars, rice, processed flours etc,
and eat more "Whole Grains".

They even gave a hint; "Barley is a whole grain"

But when I go to my grocers, what should I be looking for ?
I don't just want to buy a bag of whole-wheat flour.

Is Grits a whole grain ?

Interesting question. The answer is no, as I found out he
http://www.mycustompak.com/healthNot...Guide/Corn.htm

Raisin Bran?

Well, it contains "bran" which technically isn't a whole grain but
practically-speaking it is the part of the grain that "whole grain" is
supposed to keep. So, that works as a "whole grain" for your
purposes.

Oat meal ?

Yes.

( these all sound like breakfast foods )


brown rice too :

Any help here on which prepared foods are "whole grain" ?


Look for packages that say "whole wheat" or "whole grain _____".
Here are a couple of guides:
http://www.cspinet.org/nah/wwheat.html

http://www.mycustompak.com/healthNot...ood-Contents-L
ist
(this one is nice, it has photos)

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!


And barley is great to cook if you're tired of rice (look for it by the
dried beans and bean soup mixes). It's also good if you simply add it to
vegetable soup to thicken it.

Jill


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Old 19-10-2003, 03:37 PM
PENMART01
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

"RJ" writes:

I just finished reading the "nutrition" article in TIME magazine.
They've convinced me;
Reduce sugars, rice, processed flours etc,
and eat more "Whole Grains".

They even gave a hint; "Barley is a whole grain"

But when I go to my grocers, what should I be looking for ?
I don't just want to buy a bag of whole-wheat flour.

Is Grits a whole grain ? Raisin Bran ? Oat meal ?
( these all sound like breakfast foods )

Any help here on which prepared foods are "whole grain" ?


Technically not a grain but with this you don't need any others:

http://www.thebirkettmills.com


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

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Old 19-10-2003, 03:50 PM
Hahabogus
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

"jmcquown" wrote in
:

And barley is great to cook if you're tired of rice (look for it by the
dried beans and bean soup mixes). It's also good if you simply add it to
vegetable soup to thicken it.

Jill



These are just a few.
Pearl barley or pot barley.
CouCous
Granola, Muesil (good as breakfast or snaking food)
Red River Cerial, cream of wheat etc...
Rolled oats, oatmeal





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Old 19-10-2003, 04:10 PM
Julia Altshuler
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"


Any help here on which prepared foods are "whole grain" ?



It is quite an old cookbook but a useful one: Laurel's Kitchen. You
don't have to like the whole philosophy; the information on grains and
whole grains is good. The trouble, you'll find, is that most prepared
cereals can come in whole or polished varieties. For example, pearled
barley has had the outer bran taken off, but you can get whole barley at
the health food store.

--Lia

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Old 19-10-2003, 06:28 PM
John Misrahi
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"


Quinoa is pretty good as a rice 'substitute' as well.

These are just a few.
Pearl barley or pot barley.
CouCous
Granola, Muesil (good as breakfast or snaking food)
Red River Cerial, cream of wheat etc...
Rolled oats, oatmeal





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Old 19-10-2003, 07:08 PM
Curly Sue
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 13:28:12 -0400, "John Misrahi"
wrote:

Quinoa is pretty good as a rice 'substitute' as well.


Strangely enough, there's confusion about whether it's a grain (who
woulda thought otherwise?)

http://www.mycustompak.com/healthNot...-Contents-List
Pronounced "keen-wa," this so-called grain is actually a fruit.
Cultivation of the tiny, disc-shaped quinoa began about 3,000
years ago in the Andes mountain region, mostly in Peru and
Bolivia. It was the most widely cultivated crop among the Incas,
who considered it a sacred plant and used it in rituals. Today,
quinoa is grown in South America and in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.


http://64.106.220.190/recipes/d/quinoa/

OTOH,
http://www.quinoa.net/index.html
http://www.cspinet.org/nah/wwheat.html

"Quinoa and oatmeal are whole grains. Bulgur and couscous
sometimes are and sometimes aren't."


Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
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Old 19-10-2003, 07:08 PM
PENMART01
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

Hahabogus writes:

These are just a few.
Pearl barley or pot barley.


Only the pot barley is whole grain, pearl barley has had the bran removed.

CouCous


Couscous is pasta, duh.

Granola, Muesil (good as breakfast or snaking food)


These are cereals, almost always contain polished grains, not whole grains...
and what the frig is "snaking food"... live mice?

Red River Cerial, cream of wheat etc...
Rolled oats, oatmeal


Cream of wheat and rolled oats are not whole grain, the bran has been removed.

oats
According to a definition in Samuel Johnson's 1755 Dictionary of the English
Language , oats were "a grain which in England is generally given to horses,
but which in Scotland supports the people." Since oats are by far the most
nutritious of the cereal grasses, it would appear that the Scots were ahead of
the rest of us. Today, whole oats are still used as animal fodder. Humans don't
usually consume them until after the oats have been cleaned, toasted, hulled
and cleaned again, after which time they become oat groats (which still contain
most of the original nutrients). Oat groats can be cooked and served as cereal,
or prepared in the same manner as rice and used as a side dish or in a dish
such as a salad or stuffing. When steamed and flattened with huge rollers, oat
groats become regular rolled oats (also called old-fashioned oats ). They take
about 15 minutes to cook. Quick-cooking rolled oats are groats that have been
cut into several pieces before being steamed and rolled into thinner flakes.
Though they cook in about 5 minutes, many think the flavor and texture are
never quite as satisfying as with regular rolled oats. Old-fashioned oats and
quick-cooking oats can usually be interchanged in recipes. Instant oats,
however, are not interchangeable because they're made with cut groats that have
been precooked and dried before being rolled. This precooking process so
softens the oat pieces that, after being combined with a liquid, the mixture
can turn baked goods such as muffins or cookies into gooey lumps. Most instant
oatmeal is packaged with salt, sugar and other flavorings. Scotch oats or
steel-cut oats or Irish oatmeal are all names for groats that have been cut
into 2 to 3 pieces and not rolled. They take considerably longer to cook than
rolled oats and have a decidedly chewy texture. Oat flour is made from groats
that have been ground into powder. It contains no gluten, however, so €” for
baked goods that need to rise, like yeast breads €” must be combined with a
flour that does. Oat bran is the outer casing of the oat and is particularly
high in soluble fiber, thought to be a leading contender in the fight against
high cholesterol. Oat bran, groats, flour and Scotch oats are more likely to be
found in health-food stores than supermarkets. Oats are high in vitamin B-1 and
contain a good amount of vitamins B-2 and E.

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995
based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.



---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

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Old 19-10-2003, 07:18 PM
PENMART01
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

"John Misrahi" writes:

Quinoa is pretty good as a rice 'substitute' as well.


Actually quinoa is far more nutritious than rice.

[KEEN-wah]
Although quinoa is new to the American market, it was a staple of the ancient
Incas, who called it "the mother grain." To this day it's an important food in
South American cuisine. Hailed as the "supergrain of the future," quinoa
contains more protein than any other grain. It's considered a complete protein
because it contains all eight essential amino acids. Quinoa is also higher in
unsaturated fats and lower in carbohydrates than most grains, and it provides a
rich and balanced source of vital nutrients. Tiny and bead-shaped, the
ivory-colored quinoa cooks like rice (taking half the time of regular rice) and
expands to four times its original volume. Its flavor is delicate, almost
bland, and has been compared to that of COUSCOUS. Quinoa is lighter than but
can be used in any way suitable for rice €” as part of a main dish, a side
dish, in soups, in salads and even in puddings. It's available packaged as a
grain, ground into flour and in several forms of pasta. Quinoa can be found in
most health-food stores and some supermarkets.

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995
based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."



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Old 19-10-2003, 07:20 PM
Carnivore269
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

Hahabogus wrote in message . 1...
"jmcquown" wrote in
:

And barley is great to cook if you're tired of rice (look for it by the
dried beans and bean soup mixes). It's also good if you simply add it to
vegetable soup to thicken it.

Jill



These are just a few.
Pearl barley or pot barley.
CouCous
Granola, Muesili (good as breakfast or snaking food)


Snaking food???
Do you use that when you hypnotize cobras? ;-D

Just kidding, we knew what you meant..... but I could not resist. :-)

Red River Cereal, cream of wheat etc...
Rolled oats, oatmeal


If you use cream of wheat, be sure to NOT get the instant...

Same with the oatmeal.

If you are just after the fiber, try oat bran.
It's actually quite good cooked as a breakfast cereal.

C.
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Old 19-10-2003, 08:15 PM
Mark Thorson
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

"" wrote:

But when I go to my grocers, what should I be looking for ?
I don't just want to buy a bag of whole-wheat flour.


Contrary to popular belief, "whole-wheat" flour is NOT
a whole-grain flour. It has had the wheat germ removed.

The whole-grain flour made with the wheat germ
is called "Graham" flour, after Sylvester Graham,
a 19th-century food faddist.

http://www.ivu.org/history/usa19/graham.html





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Old 19-10-2003, 08:29 PM
PENMART01
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

Hahabogus writes:

(PENMART01) wrote

Couscous is pasta, duh.


couscous
[KOOS-koos]
A staple of North African cuisine, couscous is granular SEMOLINA.


Like I said, pasta. Same as most other other pasta, couscous is made from a
dough of semolina flour, rubbed to form an irregularly shaped granular pasta.
Naturally semolina (the endosperm of Durum wheat) is not whole grain, its bran
has been removed, same as with other pastas, same as it is with couscous made
with cracked semolina. Couscous in of itself is not very nutritious, same with
pasta... with both, their nutrition depends primarilly on the added ingredients
used in the dish, same as with white rice... they are just starch. If your
diet consisted primarilly of plain couscous and/or white rice you'd certainly
die a long and very painful death, essentially by starvation.

Encyclopædia Britannica Article

beriberi

also called vitamin B1 deficiency, nutritional disorder caused by a deficiency
of vitamin B1 (thiamine) and characterized by impairment of the nerves and
heart. General symptoms include loss of appetite and overall lassitude,
digestive irregularities, and a feeling of numbness and weakness in the limbs
and extremities. (The term beriberi is derived from the Sinhalese word meaning
€śextreme weakness.€ť) In the form known as dry beriberi, there is a gradual
degeneration of the long nerves, first of the legs and then of the arms, with
associated atrophy of muscle and loss of reflexes. In wet beriberi, a more
acute form, there is edema (overabundance of fluid in the tissues) resulting
largely from cardiac failure and poor circulation. In infants breast-fed by
mothers who are deficient in thiamine, beriberi may lead to rapidly progressing
heart failure.

The cardiac symptoms, in both infants and adults, generally respond promptly
and dramatically to the administration of thiamine. When neurological
involvement is present, response to thiamine therapy is much more gradual; in
more severe cases, the structural lesions of the nerve cells may be
irreversible.

Thiamine normally plays an essential role as a coenzyme in the metabolism of
carbohydrates; in its absence, pyruvic acid and lactic acid (products of
carbohydrate digestion) accumulate in the tissues, where they are believed to
be responsible for most of the neurological and cardiac manifestations.

Vitamin B1 occurs widely in food but may be lost in the course of processing,
particularly in the milling of grains. In East Asian countries, where polished
white rice is a dietary staple, beriberi has been known for over 1,000 years.
The history of the recognition, the cause, and the cure of beriberi is dramatic
and is well documented in medical literature. In the 1870s the Japanese navy
reported that beriberi had been eradicated among its sailors as a result of
adding extra meat, fish, and vegetables to their regular diet. Before that
time, almost half of the sailors were likely to develop beriberi, and many died
of it. In 1897 Christiaan Eijkman , working in the Dutch East Indies (now
Indonesia), showed that a beriberi-like disease could be produced in chickens
by a diet of polished rice. That beriberi in humans was also related to the
ingestion of white rice was confirmed by British researchers in Malaysia.
There, W. Fletcher in 1907 and Henry Fraser and A.T. Stanton in 1909 showed
that in selected groups under close observation beriberi occurred in persons
who were eating a polished-rice diet whereas those eating parboiled or brown
rice did not develop the disease. In 1912 Casimir Funk demonstrated that
beriberi could be cured in pigeons by feeding them a concentrate made from rice
polishings. Following this discovery he proposed that this, as well as several
other conditions, were due to the ingestion of diets that were deficient in
specific factors which he termed €śvitamines.€ť

The incidence of beriberi in Asia has markedly decreased, partly because an
improved standard of living has allowed a more varied diet and partly because
of the gradual popular acceptance of partially dehusked, parboiled, and
enriched rice€”forms that contain higher concentrations of thiamine. The
prevention of beriberi is accomplished by eating a well-balanced diet, since
thiamine is present in most raw and untreated foods. In Western countries,
thiamine deficiency is encountered almost solely in cases of chronic
alcoholism.

Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service.
http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=80894
[Accessed October 19, 2003].



---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

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Old 19-10-2003, 08:39 PM
Mark Shaw
 
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Default "WHOLE GRAINS"

In article ,
"RJ" wrote:

I just finished reading the "nutrition" article in TIME magazine.
They've convinced me;
Reduce sugars, rice, processed flours etc,
and eat more "Whole Grains".

They even gave a hint; "Barley is a whole grain"

But when I go to my grocers, what should I be looking for ?


You can get all the barley you want in the form of beer. Proper
beer is made from large amounts of malted barley and water
(another thing it's good to consume a lot of) and small amounts
of yeast and hops.

Okay, I'm kidding.

Alton had a show on whole grains recently -- check foodtv.com
for his recipes.

--
Mark Shaw contact info at homepage -- http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
================================================== ======================
Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish. - Euripides


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