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Old 22-08-2007, 02:48 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

Most of the recipes I have call for cooking frittata on the stove top and
then perhaps giving it a quick broil. I'm looking for one I can do entirely
in the oven. Does anyone have a favorite? I would prefer a tested one
because I won't have time to give it a try before I serve it to guests on
Sunday. Thankew.

Felice



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Old 22-08-2007, 05:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

"Felice Friese" wrote in message
. ..
Most of the recipes I have call for cooking frittata on the stove top and
then perhaps giving it a quick broil. I'm looking for one I can do
entirely in the oven.


I've used this basic recipe for at least 10 years. Basically, it's sautee
your veggies and meat, then add eggs. Remove from heat and pop in 350 degree
oven for about 25 minutes.

Okay, that's not entirely in the oven, so I dunno if it will meet your needs
or not. I guess if your veggies and meat are already cooked, you could just
mix the stuff up, dump it in a skillet, and stick it in the oven for 25-30
minutes. I usually like to sautee onions and mushrooms and garlic to add to
the frittata anyway, though.

Here's the specific recipe. (From a 1997 issue of Glamour, as embarrassing
as that is to admit. LOL!)

This recipe happens to be for ham and cheese frittata, but I usually just
use whatever I have left over in the fridge.

1 1/2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 C chopped scallions
6 large eggs
1/4 tsp salt
3 oz grated fontina or whatever cheese
3 oz cooked ham, stripped or cubed

Heat oven to 350 degrees F.

In 9- or 10-inch ovenproof skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add scallions
and cook until soft.

Break eggs into bowl, add salt and pepper to taste. Beat with wisk or fork
until blended. Stir in cheese and ham.

Pour egg mixture into pan with scallions and stir to mix. Remove pan from
stove and place in oven. Bake 20 - 25 minutes, or until frittata is puffy
and no longer runny on top. Let rest 5 minutes before slicing.

210 calories, 16 g fat / serving.

--
Echo


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Old 22-08-2007, 08:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?


"Echo" ha scritto nel messaggio
. ..
"Felice Friese" wrote in message
. ..
Most of the recipes I have call for cooking frittata on the stove top and
then perhaps giving it a quick broil. I'm looking for one I can do
entirely in the oven.


I've used this basic recipe for at least 10 years. Basically, it's sautee
your veggies and meat, then add eggs. Remove from heat and pop in 350
degree oven for about 25 minutes.
Echo


This is more a sformato than a frittata. Which I like, but would serve
quite differently.


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Old 22-08-2007, 02:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

On 2007-08-22, Giusi wrote:

This is more a sformato than a frittata.


How so? From what I've googled, a sformato comes up everything from a
flourless cake to a souffle to a timbale. Some versions use a
bechamel sauce ...which pretty much kills the "flourless"
definition.... while others use cream, which turns it into a custard,
more akin to a quiche than a frittata. According to one definition I
read, sformato is more a method than a recipe, so I guess the
ingredients are up for grab. But, to me, Echo's recipe sounds pretty
much like a frittata. No cream or flour. Eggs are just beaten till
mixed, not whipped. Her version differs only by how long it's left on
the stovetop before baking, a technicality that seems minor compared
to all the mixture variations I've read. What's the "real dope" on a
true Italian sformato?

BTW, Mario Balto made the bechamel version with a fondata sauce. Sounded
nice, but nothing like any frittata I've ever experienced.

http://tinyurl.com/2wzd9c

nb


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Old 22-08-2007, 02:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?


"Echo" wrote in message
. ..
"Felice Friese" wrote in message
. ..
Most of the recipes I have call for cooking frittata on the stove top and
then perhaps giving it a quick broil. I'm looking for one I can do
entirely in the oven.


I've used this basic recipe for at least 10 years. Basically, it's sautee
your veggies and meat, then add eggs. Remove from heat and pop in 350
degree oven for about 25 minutes.

Okay, that's not entirely in the oven, so I dunno if it will meet your
needs or not. I guess if your veggies and meat are already cooked, you
could just mix the stuff up, dump it in a skillet, and stick it in the
oven for 25-30 minutes. I usually like to sautee onions and mushrooms and
garlic to add to the frittata anyway, though.

Here's the specific recipe. (From a 1997 issue of Glamour, as embarrassing
as that is to admit. LOL!)

This recipe happens to be for ham and cheese frittata, but I usually just
use whatever I have left over in the fridge.

1 1/2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 C chopped scallions
6 large eggs
1/4 tsp salt
3 oz grated fontina or whatever cheese
3 oz cooked ham, stripped or cubed


From Glamour? Sounds good to me and I'm sure it will look gorgeous.! A bit
of a saute ahead of the oven time is not a problem; I just didn't want to be
hovering over a stove-top frittata while the others are sipping Bloody
Marys. Thanks.

Felice




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Old 22-08-2007, 04:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

In article ,
"Felice Friese" wrote:

Most of the recipes I have call for cooking frittata on the stove top and
then perhaps giving it a quick broil. I'm looking for one I can do entirely
in the oven. Does anyone have a favorite? I would prefer a tested one
because I won't have time to give it a try before I serve it to guests on
Sunday. Thankew.

Felice


Yes.

Google for Quiche. ;-)
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 22-08-2007, 05:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?


"notbob" ha scritto nel messaggio
. ..
On 2007-08-22, Giusi wrote:

This is more a sformato than a frittata.


How so? From what I've googled, a sformato comes up everything from a
flourless cake to a souffle to a timbale.


It really just means deformed, and often the veg version is offered as a
vegetable side dish and can be much as she posted or custardy, whatever.
What it isn't is fried. Sorry, but I think frittata is fried until just the
top needs solidifying. I love both with sformato taking a small edge
because it seems lighter.

Perhaps Vilco will correct me and tell me he bakes his all the time and that
fritta and frittata have nothing in common.


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Old 22-08-2007, 06:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?


"Omelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"Felice Friese" wrote:

Most of the recipes I have call for cooking frittata on the stove top and
then perhaps giving it a quick broil. I'm looking for one I can do
entirely
in the oven. Does anyone have a favorite? I would prefer a tested one
because I won't have time to give it a try before I serve it to guests on
Sunday. Thankew.

Felice


Yes.

Google for Quiche. ;-)



Thanks, Om, for suggesting that I check out the 5,700,000 quiche recipes on
Google, but I consider quiches to be more of a custard dish, and frittatas
to be omelets. Also, as I noted, I was looking for a tested recipe and
figured someone's favorite would be nicer for my guests than a random choice
from among Google's 1,430,000 frittata recipes :-)

Felice


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Old 22-08-2007, 06:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

In article ,
"Felice Friese" wrote:

"Omelet" wrote in message
news
In article ,
"Felice Friese" wrote:

Most of the recipes I have call for cooking frittata on the stove top and
then perhaps giving it a quick broil. I'm looking for one I can do
entirely
in the oven. Does anyone have a favorite? I would prefer a tested one
because I won't have time to give it a try before I serve it to guests on
Sunday. Thankew.

Felice


Yes.

Google for Quiche. ;-)



Thanks, Om, for suggesting that I check out the 5,700,000 quiche recipes on
Google, but I consider quiches to be more of a custard dish, and frittatas
to be omelets. Also, as I noted, I was looking for a tested recipe and
figured someone's favorite would be nicer for my guests than a random choice
from among Google's 1,430,000 frittata recipes :-)

Felice


lol Sorry, it's just when I think Baked Frittata, I think of crustless
quiche. :-)

Since I live low carb, the crust is out of the question.

I'd whip together a mix of egg, carmelized onions, mushrooms and maybe a
bit of tomato and cheese...

Put that in the cast iron skillet or glass baking dish, top with a bit
of grated parmesan and bake at about 350 until it's firm and a toothpick
pulls out clean. I'd check it at 35 minutes and go from there.

It's been awhile tho'.

Last time we made this was for a potluck about 8 years ago and we made
two nice big ones from the contents of two large fresh Ostrich eggs from
a local ranch. I was selling the clean shells on ebay.

There were no leftovers...

Ostrich and emu eggs tend to cook up a bit lighter and fluffier than
chicken eggs. Same for Duck eggs.

Quiche's for us were never a custard dish. We kept it simple.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 22-08-2007, 08:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?


Really, why is it called a frittata when it's just an omelet with
different kinds of stuff in it? I don't get it.

N.



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Old 22-08-2007, 08:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

Nancy2 wrote:

Really, why is it called a frittata when it's just an omelet with
different kinds of stuff in it? I don't get it.


"Fritatta" is Italian for "Omelet" I thought.

Steve
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Old 22-08-2007, 08:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

On 2007-08-22, Nancy2 wrote:

Really, why is it called a frittata when it's just an omelet with
different kinds of stuff in it? I don't get it.


omelet = French
frittata = Italian

....otherwise, pretty much the same thing.

nb
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Old 23-08-2007, 09:40 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

"Nancy2" ha scritto nel messaggio
ps.com...

Really, why is it called a frittata when it's just an omelet with
different kinds of stuff in it? I don't get it.

N.

I was reared in a French kitchen and now work in an Italian kitchen, and to
me they are very different. A frittata seems more like a Spanish tortilla
than a French omelet. A frittata is denser, cooked through, served room
temperature. A French omelet is fluffy, taken off the heat still runny and
at its (IMO) best, anything added is added when it is folded, not in the
eggs.

An omelet is usually cooked with butter. A frittata is cooked in oil.
Grated cheese is often added to the raw eggs, too.


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Old 23-08-2007, 03:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

On Aug 23, 3:40 am, "Giusi" wrote:
"Nancy2" ha scritto nel ooglegroups.com...

Really, why is it called a frittata when it's just an omelet with
different kinds of stuff in it? I don't get it.


N.


I was reared in a French kitchen and now work in an Italian kitchen, and to
me they are very different. A frittata seems more like a Spanish tortilla
than a French omelet. A frittata is denser, cooked through, served room
temperature. A French omelet is fluffy, taken off the heat still runny and
at its (IMO) best, anything added is added when it is folded, not in the
eggs.

An omelet is usually cooked with butter. A frittata is cooked in oil.
Grated cheese is often added to the raw eggs, too.


I put omelet ingredients in the egg mixture before putting it in the
pan, and usually add the cheese last, before folding, so it can melt
at the last minute. I must be making frittatas, only I serve them
hot.

(I am really clueless - I thought frittata was a Mexican word.)

N.

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Old 23-08-2007, 04:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked frittata?

On 2007-08-23, Nancy2 wrote:

I put omelet ingredients in the egg mixture before putting it in the
pan, and usually add the cheese last, before folding, so it can melt
at the last minute.


It appears you might enjoy my recipe for scrambled *** omelet eggs
which I dub Eggs Garp:

http://tinyurl.com/2lpl89

nb


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