Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 08-12-2004, 09:52 PM
Kurt
 
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Default a large ham

I would love to grill a large ham out on grill. It has a cover or hood to
make oven. Is this a wise move?
Kurt



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Old 08-12-2004, 10:05 PM
Bubba
 
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Kurt wrote:

I would love to grill a large ham out on grill. It has a cover or hood to
make oven. Is this a wise move?
Kurt




You'd probably be better off slamming your pecker in a sliding glass
door. Seriously, though....if you try to grill a whole ham, it's going
to be burned on the outside and raw in the middle. Why not try some
nice ham steaks?

Bubba

--
You wanna measure, or you wanna cook?


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Old 08-12-2004, 10:15 PM
Kurt
 
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I was thinking abt ham steaks. That is why I asked here. Thank u. Kurt
"Bubba" wrote in message . ..
Kurt wrote:

I would love to grill a large ham out on grill. It has a cover or hood to
make oven. Is this a wise move?
Kurt


You'd probably be better off slamming your pecker in a sliding glass door. Seriously, though....if you try to grill a whole ham, it's going to be burned on the outside and raw in the middle. Why not try some nice ham steaks?

Bubba


--
You wanna measure, or you wanna cook?
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Old 09-12-2004, 01:16 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"Kurt" wrote in message
...
I would love to grill a large ham out on grill. It has a cover or hood to
make oven. Is this a wise move?
Kurt


Anything that can be cooked in an oven can be cooked on the grill. For a
whole ham, use indirect heat. Food on one side, burner lit on the opposite
side.


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Old 09-12-2004, 02:44 AM
Piedmont
 
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
snip
Anything that can be cooked in an oven can be cooked on the grill. For a
whole ham, use indirect heat. Food on one side, burner lit on the opposite
side.


Absolutely! I agree totally with Ed! For example if you have a Weber
kettle, get a round thin cheapy aluminum pan. Set it in the center of
the coal grill. place coals around the outside of the pan and set the
ham in the center of the grill, directly above the aluminum pan. You
could also place a sheet of aluminum foil under the ham to ensure that
the heat is indirect, leaving about 3 inches gap around edge of grill.
You could also do a Minion type deal with the coals, only lit 1/2 of the
coals in the ring of coals, allowing the unlit coals to burn as the fire
creeps around the ring of coals. Keep a space open at the end of the
ring so the coals only burn in one direction.

--
Mike Willsey
http://groups.msn.com/ThePracticalBarBQr/_whatsnew.msnw


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Old 09-12-2004, 04:54 AM
Kurt
 
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Default

I have a top of line Sears Gas Grill. Since im so new to this, is it wise to
have 2 or 3 bottles of lp gas on hand?
Kurt
"Piedmont" wrote in message
...
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
snip
Anything that can be cooked in an oven can be cooked on the grill. For

a
whole ham, use indirect heat. Food on one side, burner lit on the

opposite
side.


Absolutely! I agree totally with Ed! For example if you have a Weber
kettle, get a round thin cheapy aluminum pan. Set it in the center of
the coal grill. place coals around the outside of the pan and set the
ham in the center of the grill, directly above the aluminum pan. You
could also place a sheet of aluminum foil under the ham to ensure that
the heat is indirect, leaving about 3 inches gap around edge of grill.
You could also do a Minion type deal with the coals, only lit 1/2 of the
coals in the ring of coals, allowing the unlit coals to burn as the fire
creeps around the ring of coals. Keep a space open at the end of the
ring so the coals only burn in one direction.

--
Mike Willsey
http://groups.msn.com/ThePracticalBarBQr/_whatsnew.msnw



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Old 09-12-2004, 06:18 AM
Kent
 
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Default

I agree totally with the preceeding two posters. Just cook the ham at a very
low temp., 250F or so, for a long time. It will take hours to warm your
whole ham to 115F or so to eating temp. Check it with a rapid reading
thermometer and when it hits 115F take it off and let it rest. This is all
assuming you have a precooked ham, which 99% of the time you do.
Use an oven thermometer on the grill surface of your indirectly heating
grill right in the middle where the ham sits. Don't rely on the thermometer
in the lid.
Finally, the ham will taste better on the grill. Throw in a few chunks of
hardwood during all of this and it will taste even better.
Happy Holiday
Kent
"Piedmont" wrote in message
...
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
snip
Anything that can be cooked in an oven can be cooked on the grill. For a
whole ham, use indirect heat. Food on one side, burner lit on the
opposite side.


Absolutely! I agree totally with Ed! For example if you have a Weber
kettle, get a round thin cheapy aluminum pan. Set it in the center of the
coal grill. place coals around the outside of the pan and set the ham in
the center of the grill, directly above the aluminum pan. You could also
place a sheet of aluminum foil under the ham to ensure that the heat is
indirect, leaving about 3 inches gap around edge of grill. You could also
do a Minion type deal with the coals, only lit 1/2 of the coals in the
ring of coals, allowing the unlit coals to burn as the fire creeps around
the ring of coals. Keep a space open at the end of the ring so the coals
only burn in one direction.

--
Mike Willsey
http://groups.msn.com/ThePracticalBarBQr/_whatsnew.msnw



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Old 09-12-2004, 10:36 AM
Bubba
 
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

"Kurt" wrote in message
...


I would love to grill a large ham out on grill. It has a cover or hood to
make oven. Is this a wise move?
Kurt



Anything that can be cooked in an oven can be cooked on the grill. For a
whole ham, use indirect heat. Food on one side, burner lit on the opposite
side.




You guys are confusing me. (Not that that's hard to do most days) To
"grill" (verb) involves high, direct heat....like
broiling....correct? Using indirect heat is basically roasting....no?
And "Q'ing" is just a low roast with some wood smoke involved?
Just want to make sure I'm speaking the same language.
Thanks,
Bubba


--
You wanna measure, or you wanna cook?


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Old 09-12-2004, 11:16 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default


"Bubba"
You guys are confusing me. (Not that that's hard to do most days) To
"grill" (verb) involves high, direct heat....like broiling....correct?
Using indirect heat is basically roasting....no? And "Q'ing" is just a low
roast with some wood smoke involved?
Just want to make sure I'm speaking the same language.
Thanks,
Bubba


Yes, technically you are correct. You just don't "grill" large pieces of
meat, even though you are cooking them on the grill. The result is burnt
outside, raw inside. Lots of nuances in cooking. Thick steaks are stqarted
on high heat, but then moved to lower heat, etc.


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Old 09-12-2004, 11:16 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Bubba"
You guys are confusing me. (Not that that's hard to do most days) To
"grill" (verb) involves high, direct heat....like broiling....correct?
Using indirect heat is basically roasting....no? And "Q'ing" is just a low
roast with some wood smoke involved?
Just want to make sure I'm speaking the same language.
Thanks,
Bubba


Yes, technically you are correct. You just don't "grill" large pieces of
meat, even though you are cooking them on the grill. The result is burnt
outside, raw inside. Lots of nuances in cooking. Thick steaks are stqarted
on high heat, but then moved to lower heat, etc.




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Old 09-12-2004, 11:17 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Kurt" wrote in message
...
I have a top of line Sears Gas Grill. Since im so new to this, is it wise
to
have 2 or 3 bottles of lp gas on hand?
Kurt


Always have a spare. You don't want to run out in the middle of cooking
dinner, especially when you have guests.


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Old 09-12-2004, 11:17 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Kurt" wrote in message
...
I have a top of line Sears Gas Grill. Since im so new to this, is it wise
to
have 2 or 3 bottles of lp gas on hand?
Kurt


Always have a spare. You don't want to run out in the middle of cooking
dinner, especially when you have guests.




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