Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 09-06-2007, 11:55 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Tri Tip questions

Hello all,



I haven't posted here in a long time but I drop by from time to
time. I looked and looked but couldn't find the answers I'm looking for
when I Googled alt.food.barbecue archives and elsewhere on the net.



I have two 2.75 lb tri-tips I want to grill on my cheap Barbeques Galore
CookOn gas grill.



I am going to be marinating them over night in Lawry's Teriyaki marinade.



The tri-tips are approximately 2 1/2 inches thick at the thickest point. I
was thinking about slow cooking them on the grill and maybe even using
indirect heat by using just one burner. I was also thinking about using my
little smoker box and adding some hickory chips to add additional flavor. I
was told by my butcher to grill fat cap down.



My questions a



Should I grill with the fat cap down? And how often should I turn the meat
if all?



I am going to be slow cooking or using the indirect method by cutting off
one burner.

Is this a good idea or not?



Is using my little smoke box with hickory chips going to impart too much
flavor for something that's already going to be marinating overnight in
Teriyaki marinade?



How much total cooking time should I give it? And at what temperature? I
know that they say 160 for the inside of a thick cut of meat but would that
be too much for something this thin that's going to rest for 30 to 40
minutes after cooking? I want to cook it medium rare and I read that 145
is the correct inside temperature for that. My gas grill can cook at
temperatures between 200-500



I was thinking that I would use my smoker box and use the indirect method by
not using the grill burner that the meat is on.



Searing the top of the meat at high temperature and then cooking the
remainder of the time with the fat cap down on the grill at around 250 for
a nice slow cook indirectly.



Now it's really just figuring out how much time I should cook it
(approximately) given the above conditions? I know that I'll have to be
watching it but I was just wondering about approximate cooking time.



Sorry for asking any questions that have already been answered but I just
wanted to make sure that I am not over cooking my tri-tips.



Any answers questions or comments would be greatly appreciated.



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Old 10-06-2007, 12:36 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Tri Tip questions

"Jebediah Kornworthy" m

Hello all,

[ . . . ]

I'll be interested in following this thread, as I'm planning to cook a
Tri-tip on Independence Day, while I smoke my leg o' lamb.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their families!

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !
~Semper Fi~
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Old 10-06-2007, 04:57 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Tri Tip questions


"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 9 Jun 2007 15:55:40 -0700, Jebediah Kornworthy wrote:

I am going to be slow cooking or using the indirect method by cutting off
one burner.


Do not slow cook tri-tips. Grill over med heat, flipping 3
times, until it read 128 inside.

-sw


Thanks for your suggestion. I'll try to cook it that way but what is medium
heat? Approximately? What temperature is that?

Thanks,

Jeb



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Old 10-06-2007, 10:45 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Tri Tip questions

On Jun 9, 9:16 pm, Steve Wertz wrote:
On Sat, 9 Jun 2007 20:57:03 -0700, Jebediah Kornworthy wrote:
"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 9 Jun 2007 15:55:40 -0700, Jebediah Kornworthy wrote:


I am going to be slow cooking or using the indirect method by cutting off
one burner.


Do not slow cook tri-tips. Grill over med heat, flipping 3
times, until it read 128 inside.


Thanks for your suggestion. I'll try to cook it that way but what is medium
heat? Approximately? What temperature is that?


I don't know. Let call it 'hot'. Less than the temperature
you'd cook a steak on the grill.


On my grill I use a normal fire but lower the fire grate to the second
rung down. Use the top one for steaks and the bottom one for chicken.
I use the same rung for pork tenderloins if that helps. Put the tri-
tip directly over the fire. It gets a black singe on the non fatty
side, which more often than not is both sides now adays that those
mofo's trim all the fat off.
I used to put the meat off to the side of the fire, but like these
guys say, that results in tought meat. Direct is the way to go!

My favorite marinade for tri-tip:

1/2 cup soy sauce
Several Shakes Lawery's Seasoned pepper ----key ingredient
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/8th cup cooking oil
2-3 (more?) cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbs powdered ginger

marinade 2 hours or as much as overnight



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Old 10-06-2007, 07:11 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Tri Tip questions


"Tutall" wrote in message
oups.com...
On Jun 9, 9:16 pm, Steve Wertz wrote:
On Sat, 9 Jun 2007 20:57:03 -0700, Jebediah Kornworthy wrote:
"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
news On Sat, 9 Jun 2007 15:55:40 -0700, Jebediah Kornworthy wrote:


I am going to be slow cooking or using the indirect method by cutting
off
one burner.


Do not slow cook tri-tips. Grill over med heat, flipping 3
times, until it read 128 inside.


Thanks for your suggestion. I'll try to cook it that way but what is
medium
heat? Approximately? What temperature is that?


I don't know. Let call it 'hot'. Less than the temperature
you'd cook a steak on the grill.


On my grill I use a normal fire but lower the fire grate to the second
rung down. Use the top one for steaks and the bottom one for chicken.
I use the same rung for pork tenderloins if that helps. Put the tri-
tip directly over the fire. It gets a black singe on the non fatty
side, which more often than not is both sides now adays that those
mofo's trim all the fat off.
I used to put the meat off to the side of the fire, but like these
guys say, that results in tought meat. Direct is the way to go!

My favorite marinade for tri-tip:

1/2 cup soy sauce
Several Shakes Lawery's Seasoned pepper ----key ingredient
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/8th cup cooking oil
2-3 (more?) cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbs powdered ginger

marinade 2 hours or as much as overnight



Tutall,


Many thanks for the input and the Marinade recipe. I would have
tried your marinade but I already had my marinating when I wrote the
original post. I got some Interesting advice and will let everyone know how
things work out..

Jeb




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Old 11-06-2007, 02:40 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Posts: 8
Default Tri Tip questions




My questions a



Should I grill with the fat cap down? And how often should I turn the
meat if all?


I sear fat cap, then turn and let it finish over indirect medium /high heat.

I am going to be slow cooking or using the indirect method by cutting off
one burner.

Is this a good idea or not?


I wouldn't cook this cut slowly.



Is using my little smoke box with hickory chips going to impart too much
flavor for something that's already going to be marinating overnight in
Teriyaki marinade?

Santa Maria style cooks them over oak and uses a simple rub like Susie Q's
(google it, you can buy it online). This is a delicious cut of meat. It's
great with salt and pepper. I personally wouldn't mask the flavor with
teiyaki, but I know many do.


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Old 20-06-2007, 11:48 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Tri Tip questions

In article , Jim
Johansen wrote:



My questions a



Should I grill with the fat cap down? And how often should I turn the
meat if all?


I sear fat cap, then turn and let it finish over indirect medium /high heat.

I am going to be slow cooking or using the indirect method by cutting off
one burner.

Is this a good idea or not?


I wouldn't cook this cut slowly.



Is using my little smoke box with hickory chips going to impart too much
flavor for something that's already going to be marinating overnight in
Teriyaki marinade?

Santa Maria style cooks them over oak and uses a simple rub like Susie Q's
(google it, you can buy it online). This is a delicious cut of meat. It's
great with salt and pepper. I personally wouldn't mask the flavor with
teiyaki, but I know many do.



I cook mine exclusively Santa Maria style, since I live about 20 miles
from there. My rub is dry, no marinade, and it takes about 45 mins to
cook a 3-4 lb. tri-tip til it's pink inside. My rub is 2 parts flour, 1
part dry mustard, 1/2 part EACH garlic salt, kosher salt, ground black
pepper, and onion powder. You can add a little dried parsley if you
like. Rub it in good and let it rest for at least an hour. The roast
should be room-temperature before you put it on the grill. DO NOT trim
the fat! A kettle grill works good, with a two-level fire, oak or
charcoal. Sear both sides, watch that the fat cap doesn't burn, then
move the whole roast to indirect heat, cover the grill with all the
vents open and roast until you get 130 degrees at the thickest part.
Let it rest for five minutes while temp comes up to 135. Slice across
the grain and serve with pinto beans, green salad and garlic bread.

-Frank

--
Here's some of my work:
http://www.franksknives.com/
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Old 26-06-2007, 12:41 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Tri Tip questions

You can sear the "fat cap" all you want.
Then when you trim off the cap you have meat
that looks naked to the world - no grill marks,
no bbq color, blanko. Don't slow-cook t.t.

JMHO - trim off the fat cap first. Do a dry rub of
your favorite mix. Direct heat cook - high and tight
(meaning if you have more than one t.t., keep them
nested together to save heat loss). Get a nice "crust" on each side - turn
once,
twice or more to acheive the results. Goal is a med./rare inside with a nice
dark crust.

Always slice across the grain. Serve with Salsa.

"Jim Johansen" wrote in message
. net...



My questions a



Should I grill with the fat cap down? And how often should I turn the
meat if all?


I sear fat cap, then turn and let it finish over indirect medium /high
heat.

I am going to be slow cooking or using the indirect method by cutting off
one burner.

Is this a good idea or not?


I wouldn't cook this cut slowly.



Is using my little smoke box with hickory chips going to impart too much
flavor for something that's already going to be marinating overnight in
Teriyaki marinade?

Santa Maria style cooks them over oak and uses a simple rub like Susie Q's
(google it, you can buy it online). This is a delicious cut of meat.
It's great with salt and pepper. I personally wouldn't mask the flavor
with teiyaki, but I know many do.





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