Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 14-09-2005, 02:28 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cinnamon roll-cinnamon danish


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en
to illustrate what I'm referring to.
The thicker/higher ones are what I would refer to as cinnamon rolls, and the
thinner/flatter ones I would refer to as cinnamon pastry.
Of these on the first page, the one that most closely resembles the recipe I
would like to make is 1130-cinnamon roll-danish and it is a little dryer
inside.

Does anyone have a recipe, maybe one that I would not have to layer the
dough with butter like making a croissant, that might make something similar
to the 1130-cinnamon roll-danish. I've googled, but found nothing with
pictures; perhaps referring me to a recipe in a cookbook, that if I don't
have, I can check out at the library.
Thanks so much.
Dee



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Old 14-09-2005, 04:46 AM
chembake
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Dee Randall wrote:
Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en
to illustrate what I'm referring to.
The thicker/higher ones are what I would refer to as cinnamon rolls, and the
thinner/flatter ones I would refer to as cinnamon pastry.
Of these on the first page, the one that most closely resembles the recipe I
would like to make is 1130-cinnamon roll-danish and it is a little dryer
inside.

Does anyone have a recipe, maybe one that I would not have to layer the
dough with butter like making a croissant, that might make something similar
to the 1130-cinnamon roll-danish. I've googled, but found nothing with
pictures; perhaps referring me to a recipe in a cookbook, that if I don't
have, I can check out at the library.
Thanks so much.
Dee


That would be difficult Dee
That product you selected is made through lamination process...in the
same way as the croissant.

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Old 14-09-2005, 04:57 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"chembake" wrote in message
ups.com...

Dee Randall wrote:
Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en
to illustrate what I'm referring to.
The thicker/higher ones are what I would refer to as cinnamon rolls, and
the
thinner/flatter ones I would refer to as cinnamon pastry.
Of these on the first page, the one that most closely resembles the
recipe I
would like to make is 1130-cinnamon roll-danish and it is a little dryer
inside.

Does anyone have a recipe, maybe one that I would not have to layer the
dough with butter like making a croissant, that might make something
similar
to the 1130-cinnamon roll-danish. I've googled, but found nothing with
pictures; perhaps referring me to a recipe in a cookbook, that if I don't
have, I can check out at the library.
Thanks so much.
Dee


That would be difficult Dee
That product you selected is made through lamination process...in the
same way as the croissant.


Hmmm: I suspected that, but for some reason, it had the texture more of a
brioche.
Dee


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Old 14-09-2005, 05:49 AM
chembake
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hmmm: I suspected that, but for some reason, it had the texture more of a
brioche.

Dee
...

Some danish pastries are made by scotch methods where the chunks of
fat are mixed in with the dough pieces and then sheeted, given a book
turn, allowed to rest in the fridge to recover its extensibility anf
firm up the fat ;then sheeted and given another book or either 3- fold
/half turn and then allowed to rest again before finall its sheeted to
the requred thickness where the desired filling is spread and then
rolled in the swiss roll fashion,
That technique can produce textures that range from brioche l to
croissant similarity depending on the number of sheeting and turning
as well as the skill of the baker.

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Old 14-09-2005, 02:08 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"chembake" wrote in message
oups.com...
Hmmm: I suspected that, but for some reason, it had the texture more of a
brioche.

Dee
...

Some danish pastries are made by scotch methods where the chunks of
fat are mixed in with the dough pieces and then sheeted, given a book
turn, allowed to rest in the fridge to recover its extensibility anf
firm up the fat ;then sheeted and given another book or either 3- fold
/half turn and then allowed to rest again before finall its sheeted to
the requred thickness where the desired filling is spread and then
rolled in the swiss roll fashion,
That technique can produce textures that range from brioche l to
croissant similarity depending on the number of sheeting and turning
as well as the skill of the baker.


I think I'm going to have to read up more on croissant making. I really
know nothing about it, having had a class once where we made croissants by a
method similar to that you are describing above. I realized I never wanted
to make croissants at that time as it was too labor intensive. And I've not
eaten a lot of croissants during my lifetime as a result of that class some
25 years ago. I pass them up in the stores all the time for that reason as
well as thinking I'd rather have something tastier for all those calories.

But this cinnamon roll-pastry that I had - of all places, Starbucks several
months ago (I don't drink Starbucks, don't get me started) - just has kept
the thought of trying to make one like it, but I think it would probably
take an experienced person to decide what made this particular pastry better
than any other of its kind tastier to me. It's wishful thinking on my part
and probably something I'll have to ask at the 'pearly gates.' I'd be
willing to try, but it would be a struggle going thru every cinnamon
roll-pastry recipe on the bookshelves.
Much appreciation,
Dee





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Old 16-09-2005, 02:06 AM
Debra Fritz
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 23:57:27 -0400, "Dee Randall"
wrote:


Hmmm: I suspected that, but for some reason, it had the texture more of a
brioche.
Dee


I'm taking some baking lessons and one of the things we discussed was
using brioche for cinnamon rolls and a few other things. It does
work..I tried it...

The gal teaching the classes is CIA trained and has her own bakery.
She told me that either Nancy Silverton or someone else of that
caliber (I can't remember) has several brioche dough
pasteries..including cinnamon rolls in her cook book.

Debra
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Old 17-09-2005, 01:00 AM
Alex Rast
 
Posts: n/a
Default

at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in ,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg). At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly, not
tooth-aching sweetness.
--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
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Old 17-09-2005, 01:47 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in ,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg). At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be

what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly, not
tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount of
sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of baking,
the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the intensity of the
cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the cloying sweetness of
the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of frosting they slather on it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Prepare dough as you would any other bread (I will list the instructions if
you want, but I assume that you know how to make yeasted dough) and let rise
until double.

Deflate dough, roll out into rectangle approx. 14 x 20. Spread or brush on
a thin coating of soft butter. Sprinkle with sugar or brown sugar and then
with cinnamon. Roll, starting at long end. Cut into slices approx. 1 - 1.25
inches thick. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise until nearly
double. Bake in preheated, 350F oven for 25-30 minutes. Let cool. Drizzle
with glaze or frost as desired.

I think this tends to fulfill your requirement of being yeasty, bread-like,
and moist. The sweetness and spiciness is up to you.


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Old 17-09-2005, 02:56 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in ,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg). At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be
what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly, not
tooth-aching sweetness.
--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)


Your cinnamon roll 95 is also the one I'd like to make. My choice actually
falls between your 95 and my 1130 picture. The reason I chose 1130 is that
it is thinner than the others, and 95 might be a little too high. Anyway,
this is what I'm looking for a recipe. Since I ate that one months ago,
I've had it on my mind.
Here's the page link again.
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Dee Dee



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Old 17-09-2005, 09:43 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in ,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg).
At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be

what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly, not
tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount
of
sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking,
the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the intensity of the
cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the cloying sweetness of
the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of frosting they slather on it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Prepare dough as you would any other bread (I will list the instructions
if
you want, but I assume that you know how to make yeasted dough) and let
rise
until double.

Deflate dough, roll out into rectangle approx. 14 x 20. Spread or brush
on
a thin coating of soft butter. Sprinkle with sugar or brown sugar and
then
with cinnamon. Roll, starting at long end. Cut into slices approx. 1 -
1.25
inches thick. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise until
nearly
double. Bake in preheated, 350F oven for 25-30 minutes. Let cool.
Drizzle
with glaze or frost as desired.

I think this tends to fulfill your requirement of being yeasty,
bread-like,
and moist. The sweetness and spiciness is up to you.

Dear Vox,
I am preparing my dough. Since it is such a big amount of dough, I'm
wondering if you've frozen half your dough at any time. If you have, at
what point have you frozen it.
Here are the instructions from the sweet dough recipe - paraphrasing:
"Place in a bowl and let rise about an hour."
At this point after you take it out of the bowl, I guess is the point I
could freeze the half batch of dough?
Thanks so much.
Dee




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-09-2005, 11:54 PM
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in ,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg).
At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be

what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly, not
tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount
of
sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking,
the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the intensity of the
cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the cloying sweetness of
the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of frosting they slather on it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Prepare dough as you would any other bread (I will list the instructions
if
you want, but I assume that you know how to make yeasted dough) and let
rise
until double.

Deflate dough, roll out into rectangle approx. 14 x 20. Spread or brush
on
a thin coating of soft butter. Sprinkle with sugar or brown sugar and
then
with cinnamon. Roll, starting at long end. Cut into slices approx. 1 -
1.25
inches thick. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise until
nearly
double. Bake in preheated, 350F oven for 25-30 minutes. Let cool.
Drizzle
with glaze or frost as desired.

I think this tends to fulfill your requirement of being yeasty,
bread-like,
and moist. The sweetness and spiciness is up to you.



Many thanks for this recipe!!! I detest cinnamon buns due to the awful,
cloying smells in just about every shopping mall!
Therefore, I have just adapted your recipe and made maple-walnut buns
instead. I've posted the results to yahoo
http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group...ase.yahoo.com/

I reduced the sugar by 40g and substituted 40g of maple syrup instead.
After rolling out and brushing with butter, I sprinkled 115g of coarse maple
sugar and 100g chopped walnuts over the dough and rolled as instructed.
After baking I brushed the tops with maple syrup.
Next time, I'll replace all the sugar in the dough with maple syrup and
adjust the flour accordingly. This is the first time I've ever made this
type of roll/bun and I know now that it won't be the last!
Again, thanks for the recipe.
Graham


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 12:05 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in
,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close
to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to
be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date
fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg).
At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be

what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly,
not
tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount
of
sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking,
the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the intensity of
the
cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the cloying sweetness of
the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of frosting they slather on it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Prepare dough as you would any other bread (I will list the instructions
if
you want, but I assume that you know how to make yeasted dough) and let
rise
until double.

Deflate dough, roll out into rectangle approx. 14 x 20. Spread or brush
on
a thin coating of soft butter. Sprinkle with sugar or brown sugar and
then
with cinnamon. Roll, starting at long end. Cut into slices approx. 1 -
1.25
inches thick. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise until
nearly
double. Bake in preheated, 350F oven for 25-30 minutes. Let cool.
Drizzle
with glaze or frost as desired.

I think this tends to fulfill your requirement of being yeasty,
bread-like,
and moist. The sweetness and spiciness is up to you.



Many thanks for this recipe!!! I detest cinnamon buns due to the awful,
cloying smells in just about every shopping mall!
Therefore, I have just adapted your recipe and made maple-walnut buns
instead. I've posted the results to yahoo
http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group...ase.yahoo.com/

I reduced the sugar by 40g and substituted 40g of maple syrup instead.
After rolling out and brushing with butter, I sprinkled 115g of coarse
maple sugar and 100g chopped walnuts over the dough and rolled as
instructed. After baking I brushed the tops with maple syrup.
Next time, I'll replace all the sugar in the dough with maple syrup and
adjust the flour accordingly. This is the first time I've ever made this
type of roll/bun and I know now that it won't be the last!
Again, thanks for the recipe.
Graham

Yum, Graham. Mine are still on the table rising. I went by the recipe and
sprinkled organic (light brown) sugar over butter. I sprinkled some half-way
special cinnamon (from Penzy's). Mine won't all cling together because I'm
going to try to make them more separate. I think I'll brush the tops with
butter instead of, as you did, maple syrup.
It's getting a little late here, so I think they'll be ready by 10 pm. Too
late to put the coffee-pot on. I hope they will not stale-up before
breakfast. I'm still wondering if these can be put in my food-saver, when I
get it. Not these, of course, but the next ones I make.
Dee Dee


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 01:36 AM
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

Yum, Graham. Mine are still on the table rising. I went by the recipe
and

sprinkled organic (light brown) sugar over butter. I sprinkled some
half-way special cinnamon (from Penzy's). Mine won't all cling together
because I'm going to try to make them more separate. I think I'll brush
the tops with butter instead of, as you did, maple syrup.
It's getting a little late here, so I think they'll be ready by 10 pm.
Too late to put the coffee-pot on. I hope they will not stale-up before
breakfast. I'm still wondering if these can be put in my food-saver, when
I get it. Not these, of course, but the next ones I make.
Dee Dee

I've eaten 3 so far and the taste of maple isn't quite strong enough so next
time, I'll definitely use syrup in the dough.
Tomorrow I will prepare the same type of dough but sans sugar and make a
cheese version - my grand-daughter loves cheese buns:-) and it's her 3rd
birthday on Tuesday.
Graham


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 01:47 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

Yum, Graham. Mine are still on the table rising. I went by the
recipe and

sprinkled organic (light brown) sugar over butter. I sprinkled some
half-way special cinnamon (from Penzy's). Mine won't all cling together
because I'm going to try to make them more separate. I think I'll brush
the tops with butter instead of, as you did, maple syrup.
It's getting a little late here, so I think they'll be ready by 10 pm.
Too late to put the coffee-pot on. I hope they will not stale-up before
breakfast. I'm still wondering if these can be put in my food-saver,
when I get it. Not these, of course, but the next ones I make.
Dee Dee

I've eaten 3 so far and the taste of maple isn't quite strong enough so
next time, I'll definitely use syrup in the dough.
Tomorrow I will prepare the same type of dough but sans sugar and make a
cheese version - my grand-daughter loves cheese buns:-) and it's her 3rd
birthday on Tuesday.
Graham

Lucky girl!
Next time I'm going to change this:
Much less yeast, and I'll cut them 1" or less. I'll put more
confectionery's icing on them, liquid: lime juice & vanilla and water.
I baked them 20 minutes convection 325F. They were plenty brown.
DH had two and I had one and put the rest in the freezer. I'll heat up a few
Sunday a.m. with a steamin' cuppa.
Dee Dee


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Old 18-09-2005, 02:23 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in

,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close

to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to

be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date

fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg).
At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be

what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly,

not
tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount
of
sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking,
the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the intensity of

the
cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the cloying sweetness

of
the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of frosting they slather on

it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Prepare dough as you would any other bread (I will list the instructions
if
you want, but I assume that you know how to make yeasted dough) and let
rise
until double.

Deflate dough, roll out into rectangle approx. 14 x 20. Spread or

brush
on
a thin coating of soft butter. Sprinkle with sugar or brown sugar and
then
with cinnamon. Roll, starting at long end. Cut into slices approx. 1 -
1.25
inches thick. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise until
nearly
double. Bake in preheated, 350F oven for 25-30 minutes. Let cool.
Drizzle
with glaze or frost as desired.

I think this tends to fulfill your requirement of being yeasty,
bread-like,
and moist. The sweetness and spiciness is up to you.

Dear Vox,
I am preparing my dough. Since it is such a big amount of dough, I'm
wondering if you've frozen half your dough at any time. If you have, at
what point have you frozen it.
Here are the instructions from the sweet dough recipe - paraphrasing:
"Place in a bowl and let rise about an hour."
At this point after you take it out of the bowl, I guess is the point I
could freeze the half batch of dough?
Thanks so much.
Dee


I think you could freeze it either went it is just mixed (before the 1st
rise) or after. With all the sugar and fat in the dough, I find it takes a
good amount of time to rise, so I don't know how it would be out of the
freezer. You would probably have to let it defrost in the refrigerator over
night.

If you don't want that much dough, half the recipe. I do this regularly and
make it in the food processor. I put all the dry ingredients, including the
instant yeast in the bowl and pulse it a few times. Then I add the eggs,
water, and butter. While it is running , I add enough warm milk to make a
proper dough. It is so quick that it is probably less fuss to make it fresh
than to freeze. However, if I were to freeze the dough, I would just make
up the rolls and freeze them. I would then take them out of the freezer and
let them rise and then bake. That way, I would be able to make one or two
at a time. This would be especially handy for weekend breakfasts/brunch.
The night before I would put a couple rolls in the refrigerator and then
remove them in the morning to finish rising. I have been known to put cold
dough in the microwave at 30% power for a minute or so to quickly bring it
to room temperature. You would have to experiment with you oven doing it in
30 second bursts until you get a feel for the amount of time required.

I have a Seal-A-Meal which allows you to stop the vacuum and seal as needed.
For delicate items I often abort the cycle before things are crushed. If I
were freezing baked goods, I would put them on a tray, cover with film, and
freeze solid for a few hours. Then, I would put the individually frozen
items in the Foodsaver bags and vacuum pack them. I do this with raw cookie
dough. I scoop out the dough, freeze solid, and then packages the portioned
raw dough. Then I just remove as much dough as I want and bake as usual
adding about 5 minutes to the baking time. That way I can mix a double or
triple batch of dough and we can have fresh cookies at a moment's notice.
Pre-freezing and then packaging is often the best solution for delicate
items.





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