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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

preserving baked goods



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 28-08-2007, 07:09 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 3
Default preserving baked goods

Does anyone have tips for preserving packaged baked goods without
using preservatives in the dessert itself? We have been trying to add
to the shelf life of our products without adding artificial
preservatives to the ingredients.

Any information you could provide me would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

F. Orbeo
French kiss desserts, LLC
http://www.frenchkissdesserts.com

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 28-08-2007, 09:28 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 639
Default preserving baked goods

Forbeo wrote in
ups.com:

Does anyone have tips for preserving packaged baked goods
without using preservatives in the dessert itself? We have
been trying to add to the shelf life of our products
without adding artificial preservatives to the ingredients.

Any information you could provide me would be greatly
appreciated.


freezing comes to mind.
you are making a specialty product. it shouldn't need a long
shelf life. brownies are good for about a week if well
wrapped, maybe a bit longer if refigerated.
lee
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 28-08-2007, 09:57 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,039
Default preserving baked goods

"Forbeo" wrote in message
ups.com...
Does anyone have tips for preserving packaged baked goods without
using preservatives in the dessert itself? We have been trying to add
to the shelf life of our products without adding artificial
preservatives to the ingredients.

Any information you could provide me would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

F. Orbeo

All I know is from the farmers' market. Last couple of years the sweet bread
maker packaged her product in just plastic wrap. What with the warm weather
and all, some of the crust invariably stuck to the package. Ick.
Now she uses paper loaf liners (like muffin tin liners) and packages them in
recyclable plastic boxes. A little more expensive, but certainly easier to
use and store.
I know that the sandwich bread I buy is double wrapped, and certainly keeps
better in the freezer than any other brand. I don't usually plan on keeping
this stuff for more than a month or two anyway.
m2cw
Edrena


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 29-08-2007, 01:29 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 11,870
Default preserving baked goods

In article . com,
Forbeo wrote:

Does anyone have tips for preserving packaged baked goods without
using preservatives in the dessert itself? We have been trying to add
to the shelf life of our products without adding artificial
preservatives to the ingredients.

Any information you could provide me would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

F. Orbeo


Try a food scientist. There's a Usenet newsgroup -- something like
sci.bio.food-science. I believe they have a document they like you to
read before posting. And they're strictly what newsgroups are supposed
to be about the topic of the group.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com - Fair baking
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 29-08-2007, 02:25 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
Ann
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Posts: 19
Default preserving baked goods

I have found that if you use Vital Wheat gluten when you are baking that it
extends the shelf life, and also if you are baking yeast goods if you would
replace some of the water with just a Tablespoon of vinegar that helps also.
You can also replace a Tablespoon of flour with Fruit Fresh that also
extends freshness.

I bake without salt so I use these techniques to help keep in the freshness
and soft product.

You may look at megaheart.com to find more information on baking. I am not
affiliated with this web site just use their recipes and recommendations
because of my husbands health conditions.

The homemade bread I make stays fresh for at least 4 days using the methods
I described. .

"Again please pardon my use of mentioning this web site, its just where I
found this infomation and good cookbooks they have published. They also have
recipes on the web site. "
Ann


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 29-08-2007, 08:38 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 172
Default preserving baked goods


"Forbeo" wrote in message
ups.com...
Does anyone have tips for preserving packaged baked goods without
using preservatives in the dessert itself?


If you want to do this your going to need to migrate to sealed
packaging filled with inert gas. That is how, for example, potato
chips are packaged nowadays. I believe the preferred gasses
are mostly argon with a small amount of carbon dioxide added to
kill pathogens. You can double your shelf life this way and I
believe you can still even use transparent packaging as your doing
now.

My guess is you already looked into this and are looking for
a cheaper alternative - I don't think one exists unless you want
to try packaging them with mothballs (that's a joke) There ain't
no free luch, sadly.

Ted


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 29-08-2007, 09:19 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default preserving baked goods

Ted Mittelstaedt wrote:

My guess is you already looked into this and are looking for
a cheaper alternative - I don't think one exists unless you want
to try packaging them with mothballs (that's a joke) There ain't
no free luch, sadly.


I walked into this late, but many baked goods dry well and will last
a long time in a FoodSaver type vacuum sealed bag.

One idea is to dry low fat unfrosted cake slices. When you serve them
add frosting and fruit compote, brandy, etc.

If you are just looking for a way to keep them from going bad, slice
them if they are larger than one portion and seal them in Foodsaver type
vacuum bags and then freeze them.

Putting a frozen one in your lunch will help keep it cool and bring
it to room temp by the time you want to eat it.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2007, 10:09 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 172
Default preserving baked goods


"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" wrote in message
...
Ted Mittelstaedt wrote:

My guess is you already looked into this and are looking for
a cheaper alternative - I don't think one exists unless you want
to try packaging them with mothballs (that's a joke) There ain't
no free luch, sadly.


I walked into this late, but many baked goods dry well and will last
a long time in a FoodSaver type vacuum sealed bag.

One idea is to dry low fat unfrosted cake slices. When you serve them
add frosting and fruit compote, brandy, etc.

If you are just looking for a way to keep them from going bad, slice
them if they are larger than one portion and seal them in Foodsaver type
vacuum bags and then freeze them.


From the original post, and looking at their website where they
sell the baked desserts, this is the old story of small operator done
good, and now is faced with if they want to be a bigger operator,
they have to start dealing with the same things the large retailers
have to - namely, how do you keep food fresh, good, and appetizing
for the weeks if not months at a time that the larger retailers demand.

This is why Americans have seen a steady erosion of the number of
different apple varieties available for sale. Most of the good American
ones - like for example Yellow Transparent - have disappeared because they
turn to much if you try storing them for a while. Back in the "good old
days"
when the pioneers crossbread apple trees, they were dealing with a lot
of stock that came from Johnny Appleseed, most of which produced
apples that tasted terrible. So they bread for taste. It produced some
famous apples, just about all of which are completely incompatible with
the large retailers needs for long shelf life, and it's why you don't see
them for sale much anymore.

Unfortunately for the original posters they have to make a decision.
Their product sold based on the lack of artificial preservatives and
taste. To sell in the large retail space their only option is to repackage
with the exotic expensive packaging that I mentioned, or add artificial
preservatives and "reposition" their product.

It's the same decision Snapper lawnmowers faced when Walmart
was courting them back in 2000. Snapper told Walmart they
wouldn't compromise product quality to meet Walmart's demands
and turned their back on them. Unfortunately, too many companies
today look only at sales figures and are willing to compromise quality
to sell in the large retail space.

This is exactly the reason I got into canning. Due to the realities of
the retail space, it is simply impossible for the large food manufacturers
to make jam or jelly that can hold a candle to the taste of home
made and home canned stuff (if it's done right, of course) There are
nowadays some specialty jam and jelly makers who can get close -
you see their stuff sold for $10 a half pint and suchlike in some of
the speciality boutiques - but you can't crack open a jar of any
commercial jelly without smelling and tasting the corn in the cheaper
corn syrup they use as sweetner, or commercial cakes without
tasting the lard used in the cake batter because it's cheaper than
butter, etc. etc.

Ted


 




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