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Old 28-10-2015, 05:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

This is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by Amy Dacyczyn.

These prices are the lowest in my neighborhood (Boston area) on a weekly basis, including a few bargains at ethnic groceries and health food stores. They do not include sale prices or any marked-down goods I might find on the discount rack. Of course, I believe in stocking up when there IS a sale, but not everyone wants to have large amounts of butter, yeast or soy flour taking up space in the freezer. (Butter goes on sale maybe 3 times a year, where I live.)

Interesting note: I made my own first chart maybe less than a year after I read that article. The updated chart below showed me that a few things have doubled in price since then (oatmeal, margarine and shredded coconut) or tripled (white flour, cream of tartar, and raisins), but baking soda and salt haven't changed at all!

The Tightwad Gazette chart had: Price per pound, weight per cup, price per cup, price per tablespoon, and price per teaspoon. To save time, I'm only listing the price per cup or tablespoon (sometimes rounded up or down). Since prices change all the time, the main purpose is to allow you to compare made-from-scratch foods with each other - more later.

Why did I include powdered milk? While it's true that (in my area) an economy-sized box, which has 25.6 ounces and makes 2 gallons of liquid milk, costs $6.99 and therefore is more expensive than liquid skim milk ($2.59 per gallon), it's still sometimes NEEDED in baking (such as one granola recipe), it's useful in camping, and it can be used as a substitute for cream and condensed milk (with sugar, water and margarine). However, I only buy dented boxes of it from the discount rack. "The Tightwad Gazette," vol. 1, talks about its uses on pages 202-203 and 208-209. (I don't know which pages that would be in "The Complete Tightwad Gazette.") It takes 1/3 of a cup to make 1 cup liquid milk.

Baking powder 12 cents (Tb)
Baking soda 1.5 (Tb)
Brown sugar 33
Butter $1.50
Cocoa 7 (Tb)
Coconut 27
Cornmeal 43
Cornstarch 2 (Tb)
Cream of tartar 47 (Tb)
Honey $2.25
Liquid milk 16
Margarine 44
Molasses $1.20
Oatmeal 25
Powdered milk 4 (Tb)
Raisins 73
Salt 1
Soy flour 2 (Tb)
Vanilla 31 (Tb)
Vegetable oil: 17
Wheat flour 13
White flour 17
White sugar 25
Yeast 6 (Tb)



Lenona.





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Old 28-10-2015, 06:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

About eggs: One can substitute 1 heaping Tb. soy flour and 1 Tb. water for one or two eggs in baking. E.g., if you know of a muffin recipe that tends to have a crumbly result, using soy flour instead will likely make it more stable. I've used it in pancakes and bread and it was fine. (Do NOT use in cookies - or souffles or angel food cakes, of course! I suspect it wouldn't work with brownies either.)

More info:

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...oy+flour+water


Also:

"Shelf Life (for soy flour): 5 to 7 months if properly stored, tightly
wrapped or tightly sealed plastic or glass containers. The refrigerator or
freezer are the best locations for storage."

In volume 1 of "The Tightwad Gazette," there was a chart about comparing
egg prices. Hint: In order for jumbo eggs to be a better deal than large
eggs, the jumbo eggs should not be more than about 35 cents higher than
the price of the large eggs. YMMV.

And four jumbo eggs are equal to five large eggs.

Here's a thread I started on that in 2009:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...ng/qmq6jjezv78


The following is also from a 1992 issue of the "Tightwad Gazette" - Amy was comparing the costs of different breakfasts. I left out the outdated prices, but the ranking probably hasn't changed much. I'm guessing the toast is not from homemade bread, offhand, since she used to buy half-price-off bread; the cold cereals are almost certainly bought with coupons.

From cheapest to most expensive:

2 oz. uncooked cornmeal
2 oz. bulk uncooked oatmeal
2 4-inch scratch pancakes
2 scratch muffins
2 4-inch scratch waffles
2 pieces of French toast
2 oatmeal raisin scones
2 2-inch squares cornbread
2 oz. store-brand oatmeal
2 4-inch Bisquick pancakes
1 egg and 1 slice of toast
2 oz. Quaker oatmeal
2 store-brand English muffins
2 oz. store-brand toasted oat cereal
2 oz. Cream of Wheat
2 Eggo waffles
2 oz. Captain Crunch
2 oz. Froot Loops
2 store-brand doughnuts
Carnation Instant Breakfast
2 4-inch pancakes from store batter
2 bakery-made cinnamon rolls
2 Pop Tarts
Great Starts microwaveable breakfast


Lenona.
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Old 28-10-2015, 06:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost


The following is also from a 1992 issue of the "Tightwad Gazette" - Amy was comparing the costs of different breakfasts.



She said, in the same article, that even in a busy family like hers, being well-organized helped them avoid convenience breakfast foods - one person can get a double batch of muffins in the oven in fewer than 20 minutes.

"Then, take your shower while they're baking. We always make extra and freeze the surplus for days when we don't even have time to make oatmeal.

"Most of our breakfasts cost 10 cents or fewer per serving. (That's 17 cents in 2014.) If a family of four chooses breakfasts that cost 10 cents per serving over breakfasts that cost 25 cents per serving, it will save $219 per year ($364.04 in 2014)."


Lenona.
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Old 28-10-2015, 10:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

wrote in rec.food.cooking:

This is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by
Amy Dacyczyn.

These prices are the lowest in my neighborhood (Boston area) on a
weekly basis, including a few bargains at ethnic groceries and health
food stores. They do not include sale prices or any marked-down goods
I might find on the discount rack. Of course, I believe in stocking
up when there IS a sale, but not everyone wants to have large amounts
of butter, yeast or soy flour taking up space in the freezer. (Butter
goes on sale maybe 3 times a year, where I live.)

Interesting note: I made my own first chart maybe less than a year
after I read that article. The updated chart below showed me that a
few things have doubled in price since then (oatmeal, margarine and
shredded coconut) or tripled (white flour, cream of tartar, and
raisins), but baking soda and salt haven't changed at all!

The Tightwad Gazette chart had: Price per pound, weight per cup,
price per cup, price per tablespoon, and price per teaspoon. To save
time, I'm only listing the price per cup or tablespoon (sometimes
rounded up or down). Since prices change all the time, the main
purpose is to allow you to compare made-from-scratch foods with each
other - more later.

Why did I include powdered milk? While it's true that (in my area) an
economy-sized box, which has 25.6 ounces and makes 2 gallons of
liquid milk, costs $6.99 and therefore is more expensive than liquid
skim milk ($2.59 per gallon), it's still sometimes NEEDED in baking
(such as one granola recipe), it's useful in camping, and it can be
used as a substitute for cream and condensed milk (with sugar, water
and margarine). However, I only buy dented boxes of it from the
discount rack. "The Tightwad Gazette," vol. 1, talks about its uses
on pages 202-203 and 208-209. (I don't know which pages that would be
in "The Complete Tightwad Gazette.") It takes 1/3 of a cup to make 1
cup liquid milk.

Baking powder 12 cents (Tb)
Baking soda 1.5 (Tb)
Brown sugar 33
Butter $1.50
Cocoa 7 (Tb)
Coconut 27
Cornmeal 43
Cornstarch 2 (Tb)
Cream of tartar 47 (Tb)
Honey $2.25
Liquid milk 16
Margarine 44
Molasses $1.20
Oatmeal 25
Powdered milk 4 (Tb)
Raisins 73
Salt 1
Soy flour 2 (Tb)
Vanilla 31 (Tb)
Vegetable oil: 17
Wheat flour 13
White flour 17
White sugar 25
Yeast 6 (Tb)



Lenona.


Hi Leona,

What is the volume of the butter used there for calculation? Also the
flour is not clear on amount. Especially because wheat flour is
normally a little more locally than white.

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Old 28-10-2015, 11:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost


wrote in message
...
This is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by Amy
Dacyczyn.

snip

This isn't relevant or even interesting. Why post it?





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Old 29-10-2015, 12:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

wrote in rec.food.cooking:


The following is also from a 1992 issue of the "Tightwad Gazette" -
Amy was comparing the costs of different breakfasts.



She said, in the same article, that even in a busy family like hers,
being well-organized helped them avoid convenience breakfast foods -
one person can get a double batch of muffins in the oven in fewer
than 20 minutes.

"Then, take your shower while they're baking. We always make extra
and freeze the surplus for days when we don't even have time to make
oatmeal.

"Most of our breakfasts cost 10 cents or fewer per serving. (That's
17 cents in 2014.) If a family of four chooses breakfasts that cost
10 cents per serving over breakfasts that cost 25 cents per serving,
it will save $219 per year ($364.04 in 2014)."


Lenona.


I'm with you. I agree the prices have gone up but in comparison, have
not shifted percentages really.

I ran a series of messages (some here, some elsewhere) a bit ago (last
2 months). I was trying to figure out how the hell I average 50$ a
week I today's prices per adult. This also includes side items like
toilet paper and such. That is 7.14 a day per person.

What I found is this:

1- we scratch cook (or close to it) most meals. THat one is too
obvious to miss as cheaper.

2- We get larger family packs and use a vacuum sealer in a chest
freezer. Some meats can drop as much as 3$lb that way but generally
savings is closer to 1$lb

3- I make almost all our bread products. The average 2lb loaf in a
bread machine costs 50cents, fancy ones can add to 1.35$. The offset
at the grocery is multiply by 4 at minimum if you want it made for you.
Generally the quality is lower as well at the store stuff.

4- We use coupons and sales wisely. The stores are not stupid. The
item that came out with a major coupon in the last weeks, is not going
to be on sale. The one that came out 6 weeks ago and is near
expiration, very well may be on sale. I was able for example to get
Johnsonville sausage at 47cents/lb with a coupon and a sale last trip
locally. You can't make your own for that price.

5- We are careful to not eat to much meat due to medical issues we have
(high cholestrol if not careful). This means we actually eat 4-6oz a
day each a day. All bets are off it it's a fresh fish though.
Inisting on 3 strips of bacon for breakfast, a 1/2 lb burger for lunch
and a 1/2 lb of steak for dinner doesnt exist here. We may do any of
those at any given time, but not every day or often.



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Old 29-10-2015, 01:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:


wrote in message
... This
is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by Amy
Dacyczyn.

snip

This isn't relevant or even interesting. Why post it?


Uh, what part of cooking and food is not relevant?

--

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Old 29-10-2015, 01:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

On 10/28/2015 6:57 PM, Julie Bove wrote:

wrote in message
...
This is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by Amy
Dacyczyn.

snip

This isn't relevant or even interesting. Why post it?


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^! ^^^^^^^^^^^!!

There goes that 'irony meter' off the charts again --- DING DING DING DING!!

Sky

--

================================
Kitchen Rule #1 - Use the timer!
Kitchen Rule #2 - Cook's choice!
================================

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Old 29-10-2015, 05:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost


"cshenk" wrote in message
...
Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:


wrote in message
... This
is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by Amy
Dacyczyn.

snip

This isn't relevant or even interesting. Why post it?


Uh, what part of cooking and food is not relevant?


The 1992 part.

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Old 29-10-2015, 01:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

In article , cshenk1
@cox.net says...

Julie Bove wrote in rec.food.cooking:


wrote in message
... This
is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by Amy
Dacyczyn.

snip

This isn't relevant or even interesting. Why post it?


Uh, what part of cooking and food is not relevant?


It wasn't about her troll self or Boveworld, therefore it was
irrelevant to and of no interest to her.

Janet UK


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Old 29-10-2015, 05:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

Sky wrote:
Julie Bove wrote:
lenona wrote:

This is based on a 1992 article/chart from "The Tightwad Gazette" by Amy
Dacyczyn.

This isn't relevant or even interesting. Why post it?


There goes that 'irony meter' off the charts again --- DING DING DING DING!!

Sky


That would be the Bove Plumbum meter... Heavy Irony!
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Old 29-10-2015, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

On Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 6:21:10 PM UTC-4, cshenk wrote:


What is the volume of the butter used there for calculation? Also the
flour is not clear on amount. Especially because wheat flour is
normally a little more locally than white.


OK, maybe I should have spelled it out a bit. Anything that does not say Tb
after it is a cupful.

I slipped up with the salt, of course - that's one cent per Tb.


Lenona.
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Old 29-10-2015, 08:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Baked goods: Calculating your cost

On Thursday, October 29, 2015 at 1:23:39 AM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:



The 1992 part.


Did you really fail to notice that I said this is an UPDATED list? And that
raisins, for one, have roughly tripled in price? Therefore, they USED to be
about 24 cents a cup.

In other words, these are the CURRENT prices in my area - and you can create a similar chart to find out what the cheapest scratch breakfasts are to make.


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