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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Boneless Butterball turkey rolls



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2010, 10:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,637
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.

She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't that
helpful.
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2010, 11:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4,540
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Oct 2, 2:03*pm, Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.

She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't that
helpful.


I would thaw it out. Definitely.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2010, 11:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4,540
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Oct 2, 3:10*pm, ImStillMags wrote:
Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't that
helpful.


I would thaw it out. * Definitely.


and....maybe inject it with some butter or broth....and wrap it
bacon.....and use a meat thermometer so you don't overcook it..

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 12:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,731
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.

She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't that
helpful.




Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.

gloria p
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 03:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,551
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 18:34:28 -0600, "gloria.p"
wrote:

Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Sat, 02 Oct 2010 17:00:08 -0600, "gloria.p"
wrote:



Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.

gloria p


I'd roast a turkey breast, they cook evenly from the inside as well as
the outside and easy to tell when done, its little plastic peepee
pops. If I wanted both dark and white meat I'd buy a small hen
turkey, about 10 pounds.. they're usually on sale this time of year at
a good price... and if still too much after cooking the leftovers
freeze well... and the hens are the best bargain, they have a higher
ratio of meat to bone than a tom... and two hens defrost and cook in
less time than a tom... and two hens, one at each end of a dining
table, make a nicer presentation than one large turkey...



For two people (and no cats that we know of), Sheldon? The OP said a
few turkey parts are too much and you're suggesting two 10 lb. turkeys?


Comprehension, Gloria, comprehension.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 06:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,637
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Oct 2, 5:47*pm, Aussie wrote:
Roy wrote in news:f4a5dee1-defb-4a7a-8f87-
:



On Oct 2, 5:18*pm, Aussie wrote:
"gloria.p" wrote innews:i88dht$7qv$2

@news.eternal-
september.org:


Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy

Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is

a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.


She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from

a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way

of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't

that
helpful.


Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.


I didn't even know what a 'butterball turkey' was, so did a GIMF, and

cam
e
up with this.......


http://www.butterball.com/


Put your cursor on the Tips and How To's on the left side for cooking


etc



=Thanks, was there but there were no tips for my " Boneless Light and
Dark Turkey Roast" unfortunately. I think we will thaw it in the
fridge and cook it in the oven and use proper thermometer and see what
happens.
=


Cook to 175 degrees once thawed.
(Step 4)

http://www.butterball.com/tips-how-tos/how-tos/roast

Boneless Roasts

* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove outer plastic netting and packaging. Leave inner string
netting on the roast. Drain juices and pat dry with clean paper towels.
For easier net removal before serving, lift string netting and shift
position on roast. Refrigerate gravy packet.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. Roasting time will vary from guidelines above if roast is covered or
placed in an oven-cooking bag. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap
roast in foil and let stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.

Thawed (hrs.) * Frozen (hrs.)
1 to 2 * * * * * * * 2 to 3

Roasts may be cooked from frozen:

* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove gravy packet with spatula and refrigerate. You cannot shift
string netting, so it is important to wrap in foil after roasting.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in a 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap roast in foil and let
stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.

Frozen (hrs.)
2 to 3

--
Peter Lucas * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Hobart
Tasmania

The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
but only when done with love.


==
Thank you so much...how in Hell I missed that is beyond me. Must have
been in a hurry.

Anyway, much appreciated.
==
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 01:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,551
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Sat, 2 Oct 2010 22:46:18 -0700 (PDT), Roy
wrote:

On Oct 2, 5:47*pm, Aussie wrote:
Roy wrote in news:f4a5dee1-defb-4a7a-8f87-
:



On Oct 2, 5:18*pm, Aussie wrote:
"gloria.p" wrote innews:i88dht$7qv$2

@news.eternal-
september.org:


Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy

Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is

a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.


She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from

a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way

of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't

that
helpful.


Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.


I didn't even know what a 'butterball turkey' was, so did a GIMF, and

cam
e
up with this.......


http://www.butterball.com/


Put your cursor on the Tips and How To's on the left side for cooking


etc



=Thanks, was there but there were no tips for my " Boneless Light and
Dark Turkey Roast" unfortunately. I think we will thaw it in the
fridge and cook it in the oven and use proper thermometer and see what
happens.
=


Cook to 175 degrees once thawed.
(Step 4)

http://www.butterball.com/tips-how-tos/how-tos/roast

Boneless Roasts

* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove outer plastic netting and packaging. Leave inner string
netting on the roast. Drain juices and pat dry with clean paper towels.
For easier net removal before serving, lift string netting and shift
position on roast. Refrigerate gravy packet.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. Roasting time will vary from guidelines above if roast is covered or
placed in an oven-cooking bag. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap
roast in foil and let stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.

Thawed (hrs.) * Frozen (hrs.)
1 to 2 * * * * * * * 2 to 3

Roasts may be cooked from frozen:

* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove gravy packet with spatula and refrigerate. You cannot shift
string netting, so it is important to wrap in foil after roasting.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in a 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap roast in foil and let
stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.

Frozen (hrs.)
2 to 3

--
Peter Lucas * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Hobart
Tasmania

The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
but only when done with love.


==
Thank you so much...how in Hell I missed that is beyond me.


Alzheimer...

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 02:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,637
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Oct 3, 6:31*am, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:
On Sat, 2 Oct 2010 22:46:18 -0700 (PDT), Roy
wrote:



On Oct 2, 5:47*pm, Aussie wrote:
Roy wrote in news:f4a5dee1-defb-4a7a-8f87-
:


On Oct 2, 5:18*pm, Aussie wrote:
"gloria.p" wrote innews:i88dht$7qv$2
@news.eternal-
september.org:


Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy
Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is
a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.


She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from
a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way
of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't
that
helpful.


Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.


I didn't even know what a 'butterball turkey' was, so did a GIMF, and
cam
e
up with this.......


http://www.butterball.com/


Put your cursor on the Tips and How To's on the left side for cooking


etc


=Thanks, was there but there were no tips for my " Boneless Light and
Dark Turkey Roast" unfortunately. I think we will thaw it in the
fridge and cook it in the oven and use proper thermometer and see what
happens.
=


Cook to 175 degrees once thawed.
(Step 4)


http://www.butterball.com/tips-how-tos/how-tos/roast


Boneless Roasts


* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove outer plastic netting and packaging. Leave inner string
netting on the roast. Drain juices and pat dry with clean paper towels..
For easier net removal before serving, lift string netting and shift
position on roast. Refrigerate gravy packet.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. Roasting time will vary from guidelines above if roast is covered or
placed in an oven-cooking bag. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap
roast in foil and let stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast..


Thawed (hrs.) * Frozen (hrs.)
1 to 2 * * * * * * * 2 to 3


Roasts may be cooked from frozen:


* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove gravy packet with spatula and refrigerate. You cannot shift
string netting, so it is important to wrap in foil after roasting.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in a 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap roast in foil and let
stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.


Frozen (hrs.)
2 to 3


--
Peter Lucas * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Hobart
Tasmania


The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
but only when done with love.


==
Thank you so much...how in Hell I missed that is beyond me.


Alzheimer...


==
Thanks Brooky, so far, so good. Alzheimer's symptoms can appear at any
time...it is an insidious disease. I have seen people with it and it
so sad to see their lives slowly destroyed and the distress of family
members as their loved ones deteriorate.
==
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 06:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 362
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Oct 3, 9:48*am, Roy wrote:
On Oct 3, 6:31*am, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:





On Sat, 2 Oct 2010 22:46:18 -0700 (PDT), Roy
wrote:


On Oct 2, 5:47*pm, Aussie wrote:
Roy wrote in news:f4a5dee1-defb-4a7a-8f87-
:


On Oct 2, 5:18*pm, Aussie wrote:
"gloria.p" wrote innews:i88dht$7qv$2
@news.eternal-
september.org:


Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy
Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is
a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year..


She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from
a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way
of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't
that
helpful.


Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.


I didn't even know what a 'butterball turkey' was, so did a GIMF, and
cam
e
up with this.......


http://www.butterball.com/


Put your cursor on the Tips and How To's on the left side for cooking


etc


=Thanks, was there but there were no tips for my " Boneless Light and
Dark Turkey Roast" unfortunately. I think we will thaw it in the
fridge and cook it in the oven and use proper thermometer and see what
happens.
=


Cook to 175 degrees once thawed.
(Step 4)


http://www.butterball.com/tips-how-tos/how-tos/roast


Boneless Roasts


* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove outer plastic netting and packaging. Leave inner string
netting on the roast. Drain juices and pat dry with clean paper towels.
For easier net removal before serving, lift string netting and shift
position on roast. Refrigerate gravy packet.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. Roasting time will vary from guidelines above if roast is covered or
placed in an oven-cooking bag. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap
roast in foil and let stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.


Thawed (hrs.) * Frozen (hrs.)
1 to 2 * * * * * * * 2 to 3


Roasts may be cooked from frozen:


* *1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
* *2. Remove gravy packet with spatula and refrigerate. You cannot shift
string netting, so it is important to wrap in foil after roasting.
* *3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in a 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
* *4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
* *5. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap roast in foil and let
stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.


Frozen (hrs.)
2 to 3


--
Peter Lucas * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Hobart
Tasmania


The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
but only when done with love.


==
Thank you so much...how in Hell I missed that is beyond me.


Alzheimer...


==
Thanks Brooky, so far, so good. Alzheimer's symptoms can appear at any
time...it is an insidious disease. I have seen people with it and it
so sad to see their lives slowly destroyed and the distress of family
members as their loved ones deteriorate.
==- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


We do a 12# bird when it's just the 2 of us, and not necessarily just
Thanksgiving. You could freeze half of it for another time.......we
never make it that long. We love turkey and rerun it for days after
cooking it. That way you both have your meat preference, and another
meal to share, with little prep, at another time. Sometimes you can
find an 8# bird.
Good luck, and most of the whole ones have popup thermometers built
in!!
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 06:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,551
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

Roy wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:

Thank you so much...how in Hell I missed that is beyond me.


Alzheimer...


==
Thanks Brooky, so far, so good. Alzheimer's symptoms can appear at any
time...it is an insidious disease. I have seen people with it and it
so sad to see their lives slowly destroyed and the distress of family
members as their loved ones deteriorate.


Forestall by keeping the mind active, crossword puzzels help,
newsgroups are excellent mental stimulation. My ex MIL went down hill
fast, she went from having a very active life owning her own business
to just sitting in a chair rocking and moaning, couldn't even get her
to watch tv. Her doctors said she would have had a far better quality
of life and could have lived 20 more years had she not given up. There
are so many folks today in their 50s-60s who absolutely refuse to
learn even the very basics of using a PC... and hasn't to do with lack
of money, the library in town has a whole slew of computers anyone
with a library card can use for free, they even have free computer
classes... public schools the same, sr centers too. And today PCs are
dirt cheap, and anyone with a phone can use dial up at no extra
charge. I have friends I worked with, went to school with, served in
the military with, only one old shipmate has a PC, can't convince the
rest. It's very difficult to keep in touch over distance today in any
meaningful way without logging on... most times when I phone no one
answers and they don't have voice mail nor do they bother to check
answering machines, they don't even turn them on. When folks give up
it's very sad... we don't hear about those because they have regressed
so deeply into the shadows but there are a lot. A person can only
reach out so much and then has to give up too.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2010, 07:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,186
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On 10/3/2010 12:34 PM, Nan wrote:
On Oct 3, 9:48 am, wrote:
On Oct 3, 6:31 am, Brooklyn1Gravesend1 wrote:





On Sat, 2 Oct 2010 22:46:18 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:


On Oct 2, 5:47 pm, wrote:
wrote in news:f4a5dee1-defb-4a7a-8f87-
:


On Oct 2, 5:18 pm, wrote:
wrote innews:i88dht$7qv$2
@news.eternal-
september.org:


Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy
Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is
a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.


She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from
a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way
of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't
that
helpful.


Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.


I didn't even know what a 'butterball turkey' was, so did a GIMF, and
cam
e
up with this.......


http://www.butterball.com/


Put your cursor on the Tips and How To's on the left side for cooking


etc


=Thanks, was there but there were no tips for my " Boneless Light and
Dark Turkey Roast" unfortunately. I think we will thaw it in the
fridge and cook it in the oven and use proper thermometer and see what
happens.
=


Cook to 175 degrees once thawed.
(Step 4)


http://www.butterball.com/tips-how-tos/how-tos/roast


Boneless Roasts


1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
2. Remove outer plastic netting and packaging. Leave inner string
netting on the roast. Drain juices and pat dry with clean paper towels.
For easier net removal before serving, lift string netting and shift
position on roast. Refrigerate gravy packet.
3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
5. Roasting time will vary from guidelines above if roast is covered or
placed in an oven-cooking bag. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap
roast in foil and let stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.


Thawed (hrs.) Frozen (hrs.)
1 to 2 2 to 3


Roasts may be cooked from frozen:


1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
2. Remove gravy packet with spatula and refrigerate. You cannot shift
string netting, so it is important to wrap in foil after roasting.
3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in a 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
5. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap roast in foil and let
stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.


Frozen (hrs.)
2 to 3


--
Peter Lucas
Hobart
Tasmania


The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
but only when done with love.


==
Thank you so much...how in Hell I missed that is beyond me.


Alzheimer...


==
Thanks Brooky, so far, so good. Alzheimer's symptoms can appear at any
time...it is an insidious disease. I have seen people with it and it
so sad to see their lives slowly destroyed and the distress of family
members as their loved ones deteriorate.
==- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


We do a 12# bird when it's just the 2 of us, and not necessarily just
Thanksgiving. You could freeze half of it for another time.......we
never make it that long. We love turkey and rerun it for days after
cooking it. That way you both have your meat preference, and another
meal to share, with little prep, at another time. Sometimes you can
find an 8# bird.
Good luck, and most of the whole ones have popup thermometers built
in!!


We do the same but with a 16 to 18 lb bird, the descendants always come
here for Thanksgiving and, since our three eldest grandkids and one of
their SO's are over six feet and more than 200 lbs it takes a big turkey
plus a ham to feed all twenty of us.

I take the carcass and neck and cook them down into a thick stock, fish
out the bones, skim most of the fat and then freeze it for soup making
and for chicken and sausage gumbo. Waste not, want not.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-10-2010, 12:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,551
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Sun, 03 Oct 2010 13:54:01 -0500, George Shirley
wrote:

On 10/3/2010 12:34 PM, Nan wrote:
On Oct 3, 9:48 am, wrote:
On Oct 3, 6:31 am, Brooklyn1Gravesend1 wrote:





On Sat, 2 Oct 2010 22:46:18 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

On Oct 2, 5:47 pm, wrote:
wrote in news:f4a5dee1-defb-4a7a-8f87-
:

On Oct 2, 5:18 pm, wrote:
wrote innews:i88dht$7qv$2
@news.eternal-
september.org:

Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy
Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is
a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.

She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from
a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way
of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't
that
helpful.

Given the conditions, I'd roast a chicken instead.

I didn't even know what a 'butterball turkey' was, so did a GIMF, and
cam
e
up with this.......

http://www.butterball.com/

Put your cursor on the Tips and How To's on the left side for cooking

etc

=Thanks, was there but there were no tips for my " Boneless Light and
Dark Turkey Roast" unfortunately. I think we will thaw it in the
fridge and cook it in the oven and use proper thermometer and see what
happens.
=

Cook to 175 degrees once thawed.
(Step 4)

http://www.butterball.com/tips-how-tos/how-tos/roast

Boneless Roasts

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
2. Remove outer plastic netting and packaging. Leave inner string
netting on the roast. Drain juices and pat dry with clean paper towels.
For easier net removal before serving, lift string netting and shift
position on roast. Refrigerate gravy packet.
3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
5. Roasting time will vary from guidelines above if roast is covered or
placed in an oven-cooking bag. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap
roast in foil and let stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.

Thawed (hrs.) Frozen (hrs.)
1 to 2 2 to 3

Roasts may be cooked from frozen:

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
2. Remove gravy packet with spatula and refrigerate. You cannot shift
string netting, so it is important to wrap in foil after roasting.
3. Place prepared roast, skin side up, on a flat roasting rack in a 2-
inch deep roasting pan. Do not add water to pan.
4. Roast uncovered according to time guidelines below or until meat
thermometer in center of the breast roast (all white meat) reaches 170
degrees and the center of the turkey roast (white/dark meat) reaches 175
degrees.
5. For easier net removal after roasting, wrap roast in foil and let
stand 10 minutes. Remove netting and slice roast.

Frozen (hrs.)
2 to 3

--
Peter Lucas
Hobart
Tasmania

The act of feeding someone is an act of beauty,
whether it's a full Sunday roast or a jam sandwich,
but only when done with love.

==
Thank you so much...how in Hell I missed that is beyond me.

Alzheimer...

==
Thanks Brooky, so far, so good. Alzheimer's symptoms can appear at any
time...it is an insidious disease. I have seen people with it and it
so sad to see their lives slowly destroyed and the distress of family
members as their loved ones deteriorate.
==- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


We do a 12# bird when it's just the 2 of us, and not necessarily just
Thanksgiving. You could freeze half of it for another time.......we
never make it that long. We love turkey and rerun it for days after
cooking it. That way you both have your meat preference, and another
meal to share, with little prep, at another time. Sometimes you can
find an 8# bird.
Good luck, and most of the whole ones have popup thermometers built
in!!


We do the same but with a 16 to 18 lb bird, the descendants always come
here for Thanksgiving and, since our three eldest grandkids and one of
their SO's are over six feet and more than 200 lbs it takes a big turkey
plus a ham to feed all twenty of us.

I take the carcass and neck and cook them down into a thick stock, fish
out the bones, skim most of the fat and then freeze it for soup making
and for chicken and sausage gumbo. Waste not, want not.


That would be 'turkey' and sausage...

When it's just me I roast a turkey breast.. in three days my cats and
I polish it off.

When I have a guest or two I roast a hen, usually 12-14 lbs... three
adults and my cats can polish off half at the first sitting. The next
day even just me and the cats will polish off a good part that's left.
Very occasionally I'll slice some to freeze for lunch at a later date.

Turkey is relatively inexpensive, and it costs less to cook a whole
turkey or a turkey breast on it's frame than a turkey roll (turkey
roll will cook up kind of dry no matter what). I've never yet had a
problem with too much turkey, as I said in my first post, turkey
freezes well. And I haven't bothered to use the frame for soup in
many years, not really worth it and besides I enjoy picking and
gnawing at the frame till it's only fit to toss into the yard for the
critters. Adn I don't really care for turkey soup, I like chicken
soup much better, and then I use a whole chicken.
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 04-10-2010, 06:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,398
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

Roy wrote:
As two pre-Alzheimer seniors, my friend and myself enjoy Thanksgiving
Day together and she usually cooks turkey parts as a whole turkey is a
bit much. Last year she roasted a butterball turkey roll and it was
dryer than a f**t. I contributed a dark/light roll this year and am
hoping that it turns out better than the one she did last year.

She said cooking instructions required at least 6 hours cooking from a
frozen state. No wonder it was dry. Can anyone suggest a better way of
doing these things? Can one thaw or partially thaw them out (in a
fridge) to cut down the roasting time? The Internet search wasn't that
helpful.


For some reason, I find poultry and meat cooked with the bone(s)
to be more succulent--not that one can't dry those things out with
overcooking.

--
Jean B.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 04-10-2010, 07:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49,092
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

On Mon, 04 Oct 2010 13:48:51 -0400, "Jean B." wrote:

For some reason, I find poultry and meat cooked with the bone(s)
to be more succulent--not that one can't dry those things out with
overcooking.


The only things with bones that I make perfectly every time is
standing rib roast and roast chicken. I roast my chicken on a
vertical roaster, so it's no fail chicken... but it's kinda hard to
fit a turkey in the oven that way.

--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 04-10-2010, 11:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,398
Default Boneless Butterball turkey rolls

sf wrote:
On Mon, 04 Oct 2010 13:48:51 -0400, "Jean B." wrote:
For some reason, I find poultry and meat cooked with the bone(s)
to be more succulent--not that one can't dry those things out with
overcooking.


The only things with bones that I make perfectly every time is
standing rib roast and roast chicken. I roast my chicken on a
vertical roaster, so it's no fail chicken... but it's kinda hard to
fit a turkey in the oven that way.

Hmmm. I may have a vertical roaster buried here somewhere.
That's another good thing about moving! :-)

--
Jean B.
 




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