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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred



 
 
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  #61 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2009, 04:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

In article ,
brooklyn1 wrote:

"cshenk" wrote:
"Food SnobŪ" wrote

Like I presume in reality those here actually are, I'm great with
some
things, good with some others, average with some, and not
experienced
with others with occasional failures. I have no problem saying I am
not
expert in this area, nor should you with the idea that some aren't
experienced in everything.

There you go. Why in the name of any deity or anything else one would
bring up best jarred gravy on here is beyond me.


Everything about food and cooking is beyond you.

Very often a meal doesn't include any dish from wish to produce a from
scratch gravy yet includes a dish that would benefit from gravy. There
are prepared gravies that are pretty good quality, actually better
than what certain folks ("cshenk") are capable of preparing from
scratch at home. And packaged gravies can always be doctored...
aren't all from scratch gravies doctored, of course they are. That's
what real cooking is all about, taking what's available and making it
better. Every good cook should have an assortment of jarred gravies
in their staples pantry as a matter of course.


I think one of the more common canned gravies is cream of mushroom soup,
as is, not thinned. g Straight out of the can; That stuff is pretty
thick. Cream of chicken soup too.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

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  #62 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2009, 04:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

In article ,
"cshenk" wrote:

I love to cook, when health permits it. I have quite a few good dishes but
none of them involve gravy making (unless something fairly au'jus is
applicable). Meantime, I have 2.5G of perfect turkey stock, some of which
is reducing now on the stove. Since my guests (who made the gravy) didnt
need all the pan drippings, the rest went in the stock pot (my normal thing
to do with them to enrich the stock).


Ooh, THANKS for that idea luv. :-)

I'm saving the turkey bones and carcass this year and wanted to make
soup and since I made the gravy ahead of time and just used that roasted
chicken stock, I still have my turkey drippings in a container in the
'frige!

They will be defatted now and used in the upcoming soup, thanks!

I'll probably make cream of turkey soup and add mushrooms. It's still up
in the air at the moment.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

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  #63 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2009, 04:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

In article ,
"cshenk" wrote:

Charlotte for years called it 'whomp-n-stomp stuffing' (grin). How's that
for real people cooking?


That's priceless! Thanks for sharing that. :-)
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

  #64 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2009, 04:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

In article ,
"cshenk" wrote:

Hehe colorful by *choice*. 26 years Navy, you see a good bit of the world
over time. That and a lot of coffe brewed at lunch, still left over at 3am.
Yeah, Love that stuff! (admittedly, a developed taste one gains standing
watch at 3am). Trick to that is use a plastic spoon.


Metal ones tend to
disolve too fast.


ROFL! Thanks for that last sentence. I needed a good laugh!
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

  #65 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2009, 04:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

In article
,
" wrote:

I asked for directions on a budget homemaking group as I figured I
would get a better response. I got a really detailed response about
making a slurry (not sure how), and then adding stuff at certain
temperatures. It was way too complicated.


Making gravy is not complicated. :-) E-mail me. I make a corn starch
based one rather than screwing around with a flour roux, and it works
just fine for me... Arrowroot is another good alternative depending on
the texture you want.
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

  #66 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2009, 04:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 12,152
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

On Sun, 29 Nov 2009 21:26:42 -0600, Omelet
wrote:

In article ,
brooklyn1 wrote:

"cshenk" wrote:
"Food SnobŪ" wrote

Like I presume in reality those here actually are, I'm great with
some
things, good with some others, average with some, and not
experienced
with others with occasional failures. I have no problem saying I am
not
expert in this area, nor should you with the idea that some aren't
experienced in everything.

There you go. Why in the name of any deity or anything else one would
bring up best jarred gravy on here is beyond me.


Everything about food and cooking is beyond you.

Very often a meal doesn't include any dish from wish to produce a from
scratch gravy yet includes a dish that would benefit from gravy. There
are prepared gravies that are pretty good quality, actually better
than what certain folks ("cshenk") are capable of preparing from
scratch at home. And packaged gravies can always be doctored...
aren't all from scratch gravies doctored, of course they are. That's
what real cooking is all about, taking what's available and making it
better. Every good cook should have an assortment of jarred gravies
in their staples pantry as a matter of course.


I think one of the more common canned gravies is cream of mushroom soup,
as is, not thinned. g Straight out of the can; That stuff is pretty
thick. Cream of chicken soup too.


There are many meals that include say mashed/boiled spuds or a rice
dish, or some other grain that would benefit from gravy yet there is
no roasted meat from which to make a from scratch gravy... like how
many times have you grilled a London broil, or chops, or chicken
parts, or even a steak of any sort and wished there was gravy...
something besides ketchup, steak sauce, bbq sauce, etc... aren't those
all technically gravies, of course they are. And many times there
aren't a lot of people (perhaps just you) so all one wants is like a
cup or two of gravy and in a hurry, not even time to defrost that
quart of gravy in your freezer and you don't want that much gravy
.... canned cream of celery often goes well when doctored a bit, and
many of the jarred gravies work well, are just the right amount, and
are easy to jazz up from the spice cabinet. Cream of celery with
cheese melted in actually goes well poured over meat loaf and mashed,
a change from gravy made with the scrapings from the meat loaf pan.
Heinz jarred gravies are pretty good... I keep a few in the
pantry, never know... I'm planning a potato, green n' red bell pepper,
and onion omelet/fritatta for tonight (tired of turkey), may benefit
from some jarred gravy... will be a last minute decision, and since I
plan to make an amount that uses an entire dozen eggs (no, not turkey
eggs) there will be left overs for another meal or two, might be good
open faced over toast with gravy... what would be the difference from
pizza, really... ain't pizza just an open faced cheese sammich with
gravy.




  #67 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2009, 07:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

In article ,
brooklyn1 wrote:

ain't pizza just an open faced cheese sammich with
gravy.


Tomato "gravy". g
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

  #68 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 12:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,355
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

"brooklyn1" wrote

dish, or some other grain that would benefit from gravy yet there is
no roasted meat from which to make a from scratch gravy... like how


More frequent than not in my cooking.

cup or two of gravy and in a hurry, not even time to defrost that
quart of gravy in your freezer and you don't want that much gravy
... canned cream of celery often goes well when doctored a bit, and
many of the jarred gravies work well, are just the right amount, and


I though it was a joke on canned gravy, but now that it's explained, yes I
have done a few things like that where it might be thought of as 'gravy'.

The most common one, is a can of clam chowder (white or tomato depending on
what we want for a sauce) run through the blender then doctored with a few
herbs and spices to match what it is going with (minced onions and garlics
fried to sweet in butter then added with the butter is a common one). Since
we eat a seafood diet about 4 times a week, chicken/pork/beef/turkey 'gravy'
is rarely in the picture for us.

I'll often make a white sauce, dunno if it's classic. Roast flour a bit in
a pan for a tan 'roux', then add a combo of butter and flour stirring
constantly to make a paste, then add cream or dashi (or both). Add
seasonings and let simmer. Adjust thickness issues with arrowroot if
needed. You can also add grated cheese to this if the end desire is a
cheese sauce (use cream vice dashi then obviously).

It works for us. I agree that a jar of heinz meat gravy is a good thing to
have handy in the pantry.


  #69 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 12:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,077
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

On Dec 1, 5:09*pm, "cshenk" wrote:


It works for us. *I agree that a jar of heinz meat gravy is a good thing to
have handy in the pantry.


Like keeping sawdust on hand in case you run out of flour for baking
bread.

--Bryan

  #70 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,355
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

"Food SnobŪ" wrote
"cshenk" wrote:

It works for us. I agree that a jar of heinz meat gravy is a good thing
to
have handy in the pantry.


Like keeping sawdust on hand in case you run out of flour for baking
bread.


Grin, most of us know how to improvise although that's not one I'd try.

Seriously, you've not posted any recipes as far as I know, so you are just
starting to look like a pretender. People will like you fine if you
actually post something relevant instead of 'foodsnob' type things.


  #71 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 03:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

In article ,
"cshenk" wrote:

I'll often make a white sauce, dunno if it's classic. Roast flour a bit in
a pan for a tan 'roux', then add a combo of butter and flour stirring
constantly to make a paste, then add cream or dashi (or both). Add
seasonings and let simmer. Adjust thickness issues with arrowroot if
needed. You can also add grated cheese to this if the end desire is a
cheese sauce (use cream vice dashi then obviously).


Does deglazing a pan with vermouth or wine after frying or saute'ing,
reducing it or thickening it count as a "gravy"?

I wonder what the fine dividing line is between a "gravy" vs. a "sauce"?
:-)
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

  #72 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 04:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,077
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

On Dec 1, 8:51*pm, Omelet wrote:
In article ,

*"cshenk" wrote:
I'll often make a white sauce, dunno if it's classic. *Roast flour a bit in
a pan for a tan 'roux', then add a combo of butter and flour stirring
constantly to make a paste, then add cream or dashi (or both). *Add
seasonings and let simmer. *Adjust thickness issues with arrowroot if
needed. *You can also add grated cheese to this if the end desire is a
cheese sauce (use cream vice dashi then obviously).


Does deglazing a pan with vermouth or wine after frying or saute'ing,
reducing it or thickening it count as a "gravy"?

I wonder what the fine dividing line is between a "gravy" vs. a "sauce"?
:-)
--
Peace! Om


It certainly qualifies as gravy more than that tan, viscous stuff the
comes out of a jar with a label that says, Gravy."

Bryan

  #73 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 04:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,077
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

On Dec 1, 5:42*pm, "cshenk" wrote:
"Food SnobŪ" wrote

"cshenk" wrote:
It works for us. I agree that a jar of heinz meat gravy is a good thing
to
have handy in the pantry.

Like keeping sawdust on hand in case you run out of flour for baking
bread.


Grin, most of us know how to improvise although that's not one I'd try.

Seriously, you've not posted any recipes as far as I know, so you are just
starting to look like a pretender. *


Who cooks with recipes?

People will like you fine if you actually post something relevant
instead of 'foodsnob' type things.


Instead of, sure. In addition to, maybe some would, but OK. This is
something I made last week for my wife and she's been pestering me to
write down the "recipe."

I sliced some eggplant about 1/2-2/3" thick and set it on a layer of
paper towel with a clean cotton towel underneath to soak up some of
the juices, then I lightly salted it with popcorn salt. I chopped
some fresh basil from the garden. I put a bunch of EVOO in a large
skillet over medium heat and put in the eggplant. It soon soaked up
all the oil, so before I flipped it I added a bunch more, the I
flipped it, dusted it lightly with garlic powder (I was out of
garlic), then put a bunch of the basil and diced tomato on top of each
piece, reduced the heat a bit, and covered the pan. After cooking it
on that side I flipped it again, adding still more oil, so now the
tomato/basil was on the bottom, reduced the heat even further and let
cook for another two minutes or so. Then I flipped them onto a plate,
making sure I got the basil nice and on top of each one, gave each a
good twist of the peppermill and a light sprinkle of Parmesan.

The amount of oil those things soaked up was amazing.

--Bryan
  #74 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 05:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 441
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

On Tue, 1 Dec 2009 15:35:50 -0800 (PST), Food SnobŪ
wrote:

On Dec 1, 5:09*pm, "cshenk" wrote:


It works for us. *I agree that a jar of heinz meat gravy is a good thing to
have handy in the pantry.


Like keeping sawdust on hand in case you run out of flour for baking
bread.

Ackshully, I use it for cutting the "sharp" in my enchilada sauce - it
kinda rounds the sauce out. It's a tool, like any other, IMHO, and
while I make homemade gravy from roasts, fowl, etc., I have a place in
my pantry for stuff like that - I've even been known to harbor a can
or two of cream of mushroom soup, but don't tell anyone...

Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

---

"If the soup had been as warm as the wine,
if the wine had been as old as the turkey,
and if the turkey had had a breast like the maid,
it would have been a swell dinner." Duncan Hines
  #75 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2009, 05:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,077
Default Best Turkey Gravy, Mix, Canned or Jarred

On Nov 26, 8:54*pm, Omelet wrote:
In article
,
*Food SnobŪ wrote:

That is exactly how I do it. *I make a rich turkey stock with extra
turkey necks from the store, onions, garlic, celery, a little carrot and
a light selection of herbs included pepper and sage. Shred the meat off
of the necks and then add the roasted drippings to that. *Bring up to a
good simmer and add a corn starch slurry to thicken.


There you go. *Why in the name of any deity or anything else one would
bring up best jarred gravy on here is beyond me. * *Several months ago
I started a thread: which is better, Franco American of Chef Boyardee,
as a joke, and some folks thought I was serious.


--Bryan


chuckles *Sometimes people just don't wish to bother. :-) *I often end
up making far more gravy than I need (3 quarts or so) and end up giving
about 1/2 of it away to a good friend so she does not have to make any...

OTOH is there really such a thing as "too much gravy"? g


For many years I've said that if I won the Powerball I'd have a dozen
turkeys roasted every week, and give 11 to a shelter, but reserve the
drippings from all twelve.
--
Peace! Om


--Bryan
 




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