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Asian Cooking (alt.food.asian) A newsgroup for the discussion of recipes, ingredients, equipment and techniques used specifically in the preparation of Asian foods.

Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel



 
 
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 17-02-2004, 01:56 AM
Domenick Amato
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel


"Peter Dy" wrote in message
. com...

wrote in message
...
On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 22:59:57 GMT, KWR wrote:


My biggest issue with coated non-stick frying pans is the way the
surface starts to send off fumes when it reaches cooking temperature. I
had a small rectangular frypan once (japanese omelette) which I was
giddily pleased to have purchased, until I found it was a worst

offender
on that count. I couldn't take the plasticy odor and think I got rid of
the pan. I'm given to understand now that vapors from burning teflon
compounds will take out small pet birds.


Teflon is made from a compound called PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene),
which, when heated beyond a certain temperature (I can't recall the
figure), will give off toxic fumes.



Yeah. That's the funny thing. The directions on the pan usually say not

to
use it on high heat, but TV cooking personalities all say it is fine.

Never
understood that. I'll stick with my pure aluminum pans, no pun intended.


Peter



First of all, you are very unlikely to cause the generation of toxic gas
from a Teflon cooker. If any were to be generated, the source is so small
(the thin layer on the pan) that you are likely to be in more danger from a
fart.

Dom Amato


Ads
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 18-02-2004, 02:07 PM
Chef!
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel

Does the same apply to Analon pans? They're professionally rated ones and
I've used and abused mine for over a year now and it still performs the
same. By comparision, my previous Teflon coated ones would have given up
after a couple of months.

"Peter Dy" wrote in message
. com...

wrote in message
...
On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 22:59:57 GMT, KWR wrote:


My biggest issue with coated non-stick frying pans is the way the
surface starts to send off fumes when it reaches cooking temperature. I
had a small rectangular frypan once (japanese omelette) which I was
giddily pleased to have purchased, until I found it was a worst

offender
on that count. I couldn't take the plasticy odor and think I got rid of
the pan. I'm given to understand now that vapors from burning teflon
compounds will take out small pet birds.


Teflon is made from a compound called PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene),
which, when heated beyond a certain temperature (I can't recall the
figure), will give off toxic fumes.



Yeah. That's the funny thing. The directions on the pan usually say not

to
use it on high heat, but TV cooking personalities all say it is fine.

Never
understood that. I'll stick with my pure aluminum pans, no pun intended.


Peter




  #18 (permalink)  
Old 18-02-2004, 04:56 PM
Dan Logcher
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel

Domenick Amato wrote:

"Peter Dy" wrote in message
. com...

wrote in message
. ..

On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 22:59:57 GMT, KWR wrote:


My biggest issue with coated non-stick frying pans is the way the
surface starts to send off fumes when it reaches cooking temperature. I
had a small rectangular frypan once (japanese omelette) which I was
giddily pleased to have purchased, until I found it was a worst

offender

on that count. I couldn't take the plasticy odor and think I got rid of
the pan. I'm given to understand now that vapors from burning teflon
compounds will take out small pet birds.


Teflon is made from a compound called PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene),
which, when heated beyond a certain temperature (I can't recall the
figure), will give off toxic fumes.


Yeah. That's the funny thing. The directions on the pan usually say not

to

use it on high heat, but TV cooking personalities all say it is fine.

Never

understood that. I'll stick with my pure aluminum pans, no pun intended.


Peter




First of all, you are very unlikely to cause the generation of toxic gas
from a Teflon cooker. If any were to be generated, the source is so small
(the thin layer on the pan) that you are likely to be in more danger from a
fart.


Than I am in constant danger from myself *blappp*

--
Dan

  #19 (permalink)  
Old 19-02-2004, 02:28 PM
KWR
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel

Domenick Amato wrote:

"Peter Dy" wrote in message
. com...

wrote in message
. ..

On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 22:59:57 GMT, KWR wrote:


My biggest issue with coated non-stick frying pans is the way the
surface starts to send off fumes when it reaches cooking temperature. I
had a small rectangular frypan once (japanese omelette) which I was
giddily pleased to have purchased, until I found it was a worst


offender

on that count. I couldn't take the plasticy odor and think I got rid of
the pan. I'm given to understand now that vapors from burning teflon
compounds will take out small pet birds.


Teflon is made from a compound called PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene),
which, when heated beyond a certain temperature (I can't recall the
figure), will give off toxic fumes.



Yeah. That's the funny thing. The directions on the pan usually say not


to

use it on high heat, but TV cooking personalities all say it is fine.


Never

understood that. I'll stick with my pure aluminum pans, no pun intended.


Peter




First of all, you are very unlikely to cause the generation of toxic gas
from a Teflon cooker. If any were to be generated, the source is so small
(the thin layer on the pan) that you are likely to be in more danger from a
fart.

Dom Amato


A fart won't kill your parakeet. ( ....Dan?... )
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 19-02-2004, 02:49 PM
Dan Logcher
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel

KWR wrote:

Domenick Amato wrote:

"Peter Dy" wrote in message
. com...

wrote in message
...

On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 22:59:57 GMT, KWR wrote:


My biggest issue with coated non-stick frying pans is the way the
surface starts to send off fumes when it reaches cooking
temperature. I
had a small rectangular frypan once (japanese omelette) which I was
giddily pleased to have purchased, until I found it was a worst


offender

on that count. I couldn't take the plasticy odor and think I got
rid of
the pan. I'm given to understand now that vapors from burning teflon
compounds will take out small pet birds.


Teflon is made from a compound called PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene),
which, when heated beyond a certain temperature (I can't recall the
figure), will give off toxic fumes.



Yeah. That's the funny thing. The directions on the pan usually say
not



to

use it on high heat, but TV cooking personalities all say it is fine.



Never

understood that. I'll stick with my pure aluminum pans, no pun
intended.


Peter




First of all, you are very unlikely to cause the generation of toxic gas
from a Teflon cooker. If any were to be generated, the source is so
small
(the thin layer on the pan) that you are likely to be in more danger
from a
fart.

Dom Amato



A fart won't kill your parakeet. ( ....Dan?... )


I _used_ to have parakeets.. *blaaappp*

--
Dan

  #21 (permalink)  
Old 20-02-2004, 03:25 AM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel

On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 14:07:12 -0000, "Chef!"
wrote:

Does the same apply to Analon pans? They're professionally rated ones and
I've used and abused mine for over a year now and it still performs the
same. By comparision, my previous Teflon coated ones would have given up
after a couple of months.


Unfortunately, I have not heard of Analon pans. I know about PTFE as I
was in the air force


SIAOGU

The husband is the head of the house. The wife is the neck. And the neck turns the head.
  #22 (permalink)  
Old 22-02-2004, 06:49 PM
blake murphy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cast Iron vs Carbon Steel

On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 14:28:49 GMT, KWR wrote:

A fart won't kill your parakeet. ( ....Dan?... )


only if carefully administered...

your pal,
blake
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 09-12-2004, 09:28 PM
kalanamak
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Wazza wrote:

Its true that ptfe fumes can cause problems, a colleague of mine ended up in
hospital with what the doctors called 'polymer fever', I suppose its their
way of saying 'lets dumb it down, these poor people won't understand
anaphylactic shock!
cheers
Wazza


I disagree. Lots of laymen toss about "anaphylatic shock" or "had an
allergic reaction and went into shock" but polymer is not a word I hear
tossed about. Anyway, most docs find it difficult to quickly and
smoothly translate their words into laymen's terms, especially in tense
situations, and naturally laspe into medicalese. I got tongue tied just
this week trying to explain that a burn wound was avascular and that
debridement removed the infected dead tissue, not i.v. antibiotics. Of
course, I was being yelled at at the time, and could probably have
recided the preamble to the constitution and the family member wouldn't
have known the difference. Later on she yelled at the other doctor
because the facility the patient was coming from insisted on ambulance
transport, not the family car, like it was our fault they made that
decision.

"a physician is one we pin our hopes on when sick, and our dogs on when
well"...in this case the yeller was well. The sick one was very happy to
see us.
blacksalt
  #24 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 04:02 AM
mroo philpott-smythe
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

kalanamak wrote in
:

Wazza wrote:



Its true that ptfe fumes can cause problems, a colleague of mine
ended up in hospital with what the doctors called 'polymer fever', I
suppose its their way of saying 'lets dumb it down, these poor people
won't understand anaphylactic shock!



I disagree. Lots of laymen toss about "anaphylatic shock" or "had an
allergic reaction and went into shock" but polymer is not a word I
hear tossed about. Anyway, most docs find it difficult to quickly and
smoothly translate their words into laymen's terms, especially in
tense situations, and naturally laspe into medicalese. I got tongue
tied just this week trying to explain that a burn wound was avascular
and that debridement removed the infected dead tissue, not i.v.
antibiotics. Of course, I was being yelled at at the time, and could
probably have recided the preamble to the constitution and the family
member wouldn't have known the difference. Later on she yelled at the
other doctor because the facility the patient was coming from insisted
on ambulance transport, not the family car, like it was our fault they
made that decision.


"a physician is one we pin our hopes on when sick, and our dogs on
when well"...in this case the yeller was well. The sick one was very
happy to see us.


People are always happy to touch a doctor's toes when ill.

However, Science News did carry a report this year, I think. I forget who
did the research, but the pointer should be on their website. I think it
was the Karolinska Institute.

They said that people exposed to very low levels of fumes from nonstick
pans were showing up with a range of symptoms from headaches through
lassitude and fevers - rather like the flu. I'm paraphrasing and don't
have the article at hand.

Since most of the food I cook requires high temps, I tossed my nonstick
pans in a paranoid frenzy. Of course, it was the perfect excuse to go
down to Sur La Table and buy a bunch of nice copper pans, so I'm not
overcome by regret.

sq
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2004, 04:02 AM
mroo philpott-smythe
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

kalanamak wrote in
:

Wazza wrote:



Its true that ptfe fumes can cause problems, a colleague of mine
ended up in hospital with what the doctors called 'polymer fever', I
suppose its their way of saying 'lets dumb it down, these poor people
won't understand anaphylactic shock!



I disagree. Lots of laymen toss about "anaphylatic shock" or "had an
allergic reaction and went into shock" but polymer is not a word I
hear tossed about. Anyway, most docs find it difficult to quickly and
smoothly translate their words into laymen's terms, especially in
tense situations, and naturally laspe into medicalese. I got tongue
tied just this week trying to explain that a burn wound was avascular
and that debridement removed the infected dead tissue, not i.v.
antibiotics. Of course, I was being yelled at at the time, and could
probably have recided the preamble to the constitution and the family
member wouldn't have known the difference. Later on she yelled at the
other doctor because the facility the patient was coming from insisted
on ambulance transport, not the family car, like it was our fault they
made that decision.


"a physician is one we pin our hopes on when sick, and our dogs on
when well"...in this case the yeller was well. The sick one was very
happy to see us.


People are always happy to touch a doctor's toes when ill.

However, Science News did carry a report this year, I think. I forget who
did the research, but the pointer should be on their website. I think it
was the Karolinska Institute.

They said that people exposed to very low levels of fumes from nonstick
pans were showing up with a range of symptoms from headaches through
lassitude and fevers - rather like the flu. I'm paraphrasing and don't
have the article at hand.

Since most of the food I cook requires high temps, I tossed my nonstick
pans in a paranoid frenzy. Of course, it was the perfect excuse to go
down to Sur La Table and buy a bunch of nice copper pans, so I'm not
overcome by regret.

sq
 




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