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Old 20-10-2005, 07:01 PM
DaleW
 
Posts: n/a
Default TN: 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

Monday Betsy made chicken with shallots and madeira sauce, and we
opened the 2003 Guigal Cotes du Rhone. Hey, a 2003 that isn't flabby.
Nice raspberry and blackberry fruit, peppery, good acidity and
surprising tannins. With some air some underbrush (dare I say
garrigue?) showed through. Very good for a big production CdR. B/B+

Betsy was making Beef in Barolo for the following night, but it was
technically beef in Barbaresco. She started the marinade on Monday
night, and I substituted a cup of the CdR for a cup of the cooking
Barbaresco, and had a small glass both nights. The 1999 La Licenziana
Barbaresco seemed to have picked up a little weight (and tannins?) from
last bottle I tried, but still on the lighter side of Piemonte
Nebbiolo. At first the fruit seemed a bit dull and muddled, but it
showed better on Tuesday -clear cherry fruit with an overlay of tar and
hint of leather . Throwing a surprising amount of sediment for a 1999.
B, but good value ($10ish).

The actual Tuesday meal was the Brasato al Barolo, mashed potatoes, and
greens with apple and avocado. Besides the last bit of the cooking
Barbaresco, I served a 375 of the 1996 Abbona "Faset" Barbaresco-some
violet/floral notes on the nose, cherry and ripe berry fruit, some
clear but not unattractive or overpowering vanilla oak. This is a
fairly modern styled Barbaresco, but attractive and drinking well now.
B+/A-

Wednesday Betsy actually had another day off, and David was eating with
us (we can only sit down as a family couple times a week- 17 year olds
generally seem to regard dinner at home as a pain), so she tried to
cater to his tastes (I wasn't complaining!). More Judy Rodgers recipes-
duck with prunes in red wine sauce, baked polenta, and a reprise of the
kale with cheese & proscuitto over toast. I had a little of the cooking
wine, the
2003 Quinta de Cabriz (Dao)-soft and a little grapey, a hint of oak,
forgettable wine but not a bad deal, as it was like $6. B-

The cookbook suggested a Cahors, but not having one handy I opted for
Bordeaux, the 1993 Ch. Gloria (St. Julien). This was a recent gift from
a friend who remembered I said Gloria had a formative place in my
passion for wine. Luckily I didn't have high expectations, and my low
expectations were happily exceeded. Mature, with fully integrated
tannins and mature fruit. Actually maybe overmature, the red currant
fruit has lost a bit of vitality. But there are interesting
secondary/tertiary notes of cedar, leather, and forest floor. A little
short on the finish. Soft, not very big wine, a bit better than I
expected for a cru bourgeois from this vintage. B

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of
consistency.


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Old 21-10-2005, 01:51 PM
DaleW
 
Posts: n/a
Default TN: 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

I don't have high hopes of any wine that showed as mature/overmature on
day 2, but I've been surprised with a few (mostly nebbiolos, syrah, or
occasionally pinot). But I still always try leftovers, in the name of
science (or the name of geekdom). I had low expectations,but still the
Gloria surprised me last night. I almost spit it all over the kitchen
at first sip. A green vegetal character that wasn't there before, a
wafting VA-ish aroma, vile. So if you have them, drink 'em.

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Old 22-10-2005, 03:53 PM
Professor
 
Posts: n/a
Default 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

Dale,
Did your wife prepare the Brasato al Barolo from a recipe book? If so,
which one? Which cut of beef did she choose? I've recently acquired the
book A Passion for Piedmont and am curious whether there are others books on
Piedmontese cuisine worth having.

"DaleW" wrote in message
oups.com...
Monday Betsy made chicken with shallots and madeira sauce, and we
opened the 2003 Guigal Cotes du Rhone. Hey, a 2003 that isn't flabby.
Nice raspberry and blackberry fruit, peppery, good acidity and
surprising tannins. With some air some underbrush (dare I say
garrigue?) showed through. Very good for a big production CdR. B/B+

Betsy was making Beef in Barolo for the following night, but it was
technically beef in Barbaresco. She started the marinade on Monday
night, and I substituted a cup of the CdR for a cup of the cooking
Barbaresco, and had a small glass both nights. The 1999 La Licenziana
Barbaresco seemed to have picked up a little weight (and tannins?) from
last bottle I tried, but still on the lighter side of Piemonte
Nebbiolo. At first the fruit seemed a bit dull and muddled, but it
showed better on Tuesday -clear cherry fruit with an overlay of tar and
hint of leather . Throwing a surprising amount of sediment for a 1999.
B, but good value ($10ish).

The actual Tuesday meal was the Brasato al Barolo, mashed potatoes, and
greens with apple and avocado. Besides the last bit of the cooking
Barbaresco, I served a 375 of the 1996 Abbona "Faset" Barbaresco-some
violet/floral notes on the nose, cherry and ripe berry fruit, some
clear but not unattractive or overpowering vanilla oak. This is a
fairly modern styled Barbaresco, but attractive and drinking well now.
B+/A-

Wednesday Betsy actually had another day off, and David was eating with
us (we can only sit down as a family couple times a week- 17 year olds
generally seem to regard dinner at home as a pain), so she tried to
cater to his tastes (I wasn't complaining!). More Judy Rodgers recipes-
duck with prunes in red wine sauce, baked polenta, and a reprise of the
kale with cheese & proscuitto over toast. I had a little of the cooking
wine, the
2003 Quinta de Cabriz (Dao)-soft and a little grapey, a hint of oak,
forgettable wine but not a bad deal, as it was like $6. B-

The cookbook suggested a Cahors, but not having one handy I opted for
Bordeaux, the 1993 Ch. Gloria (St. Julien). This was a recent gift from
a friend who remembered I said Gloria had a formative place in my
passion for wine. Luckily I didn't have high expectations, and my low
expectations were happily exceeded. Mature, with fully integrated
tannins and mature fruit. Actually maybe overmature, the red currant
fruit has lost a bit of vitality. But there are interesting
secondary/tertiary notes of cedar, leather, and forest floor. A little
short on the finish. Soft, not very big wine, a bit better than I
expected for a cru bourgeois from this vintage. B

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent
wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't
drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no
promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of
consistency.



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Old 22-10-2005, 05:30 PM
DaleW
 
Posts: n/a
Default 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

I think she used chuck roast. As far as I know, she jind of combined 2
recipes, one from Biba Caggiano's "Northern Italian Cooking", and one
from the
www.made-in-italy.com website (she didn't use any lard, dammit). Who
wrote the Passion for Piedmont book? Do you like it?

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Old 22-10-2005, 06:44 PM
Professor
 
Posts: n/a
Default 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

"DaleW" wrote in message
ups.com...
I think she used chuck roast. As far as I know, she jind of combined 2
recipes, one from Biba Caggiano's "Northern Italian Cooking", and one
from the
www.made-in-italy.com website (she didn't use any lard, dammit). Who
wrote the Passion for Piedmont book? Do you like it?


A Passion for Piedmont was written by Wine Spectator columnist Matt Kramer.
Strangely there don't seem to be a lot of books about Piedmontese cuisine,
at least not in English. I haven't yet decided how much I like it as I've
only had the book for 2 days. I'm starting the Brasato di Manzo al Vino
Rosso today to eat tomorrow. I'll also make Risotto con Vino Rosso to go
with it. I'll let you know how it turns out.




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Old 24-10-2005, 04:34 PM
Mark Lipton
 
Posts: n/a
Default 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

Professor wrote:
Dale,
Did your wife prepare the Brasato al Barolo from a recipe book? If so,
which one? Which cut of beef did she choose? I've recently acquired the
book A Passion for Piedmont and am curious whether there are others books on
Piedmontese cuisine worth having.


Hey, good to see you back here, "Prof" ;-) FWIW, OSU looks pretty good
this year, though it looks like it's PSU's year in the Big 10.

Mark Lipton
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-10-2005, 06:28 AM
Professor
 
Posts: n/a
Default 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

"Mark Lipton" wrote in message
...
Professor wrote:
Dale,
Did your wife prepare the Brasato al Barolo from a recipe book? If so,
which one? Which cut of beef did she choose? I've recently acquired the
book A Passion for Piedmont and am curious whether there are others books
on Piedmontese cuisine worth having.


Hey, good to see you back here, "Prof" ;-) FWIW, OSU looks pretty good
this year, though it looks like it's PSU's year in the Big 10.

Mark Lipton


Hey Mark,
It is nice to check in. It is too early to tell if PSU can sustain their
winning ways. The Big 10 has several teams capable of spoiling Joe Pa's
last hurrah.

BTW I prepared the Brasato di Manzo al Vino Rosso and Risotto con Vino Rosso
from the book A Passion for Piedmont and enjoyed them both. The Brasato
recipe was much like Beef Burgundy but with subtle differences such as
adding a pinch of cinnamon and including neither garlic nor bouquet garni in
the marinade. The author suggested substituting brisket for sirloin tip, a
change I doubt purists would endorse.

The risotto recipe had the stock and wine added separately, suggesting that
simmering the wine and stock together somehow ruins it. I have my doubts.
Dale's wife has the right idea, take the most appealing aspects of different
recipes and combine them.



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Old 04-11-2005, 04:42 PM posted to alt.food.wine
 
Posts: n/a
Default 2 Barbaresco, 1 CdR, 1 Dao, 1 St. Julien

Nice recipes, I love the "brasato" and any kind of "risotto" too and
of course a good wine it is a must !!!! Barbaresco is really a good
combining with the brasato.

Take a look at this site, good for Piedmont recipes and wine advices
is:

http://www.vini-piemontesi.com



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