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Old 06-08-2005, 04:00 PM
Beach Runner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Heating Oil

This is relationship to the comments that heating oil changes them.


What’s a Trans Fat Anyway?
By Leanne Ely, C.N.C.

The FDA will make another change to food labels by 2006 including
information on trans fats so the consumer can distinguish if this is
indeed something he’d want to buy, based on the nutrition offered (or

not offered) and/or the potential risk involved in consuming that
particular food.

So what’s a trans fat, anyway? Trans fatty acids are created through
a
process called hydrogenation, which basically forces hydrogen into a
highly heated oil creating a hard product from a liquid product--more
commonly known as shortening or margarine.

The problem with trans fats is they are just as culpable as saturated

fats for raising LDL levels (low density lipoprotein, the “bad
cholesterol”).
But unlike saturated fats (which also raise HDL levels) trans fats
actually reduce HDL levels (high density lipoprotein, the “good
cholesterol”). So you can see where the margarine/butter debate would
logically end.

Though trans fats have only been seriously studied for the past 10
years, there are some early indications that trans fats could
increase your risk to cancer, diabetes and may even cause pregnancy
complications.

So what will the FDA say is an acceptable amount of trans fat in the
diet?
In my estimation, it doesn’t matter. Any product that contains
hydrogenated oils, shortening or margarine should be avoided. Some of

the biggest trans fat offenders are donuts, crackers, cookies and
French fries. You can probably add to that list—just start reading
labels.

In this day and age, there is no reason to not be reading nutrition
labels. Stay away from hydrogenated anything (and partially
hydrogenated oils, as well) and give your body the healthy foods you need.


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Old 06-08-2005, 08:11 PM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bumbling Twit wrote:
This is relationship to the comments that heating oil changes them.


Heating vegetable oil will *NOT* in and of itself convert it into
transfat. Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the
oil is heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal
catalysts (e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY
UNLIKELY* to occur in one's kitchen.
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Old 06-08-2005, 09:44 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

he is kinda right.

i have also heard that heating oils too high can produce carcinogens. i
don't know if that is true or not. and anyway, the sun is a carcinogen.
the thing that you need to know about hydrognated oils and fats is that
hydrognation changes the molecular structure and our bodies don't like the
new shape and can't sucessfully use them. you don't have to worry about this
if you are using cold pressed oils. because oils can be extracted using
chemicals and alchol which i have read leave traces in the oil. just use the
good stuff and stay away from anything that you can't tell what it is and
everyone will be O.K.

this is also why i am a little leary of splenda which is altered sugar. i
haven't made up my mind on this yet. i have only heard good things about
splenda so if anyone else has heard otherwise i would like to know.

"usual suspect" wrote in message
...
Bumbling Twit wrote:
This is relationship to the comments that heating oil changes them.


Heating vegetable oil will *NOT* in and of itself convert it into
transfat. Hydrogenation occurs in a pressurized environment in which the
oil is heated above 500-degrees Fahrenheit in the presence of metal
catalysts (e.g., nickel, zinc, copper) and hydrogen gas. Such is *VERY
UNLIKELY* to occur in one's kitchen.



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Old 07-08-2005, 12:50 AM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote:
he is kinda right.


No, he isn't. His article was about transfats. It wasn't about how oils
breakdown in heat. His article had nothing to do with what he said about
heating oil. I was correcting his mistake -- common among vegans and
other nitwits -- that heating turns common vegetable oils into transfats.

i have also heard that heating oils too high can produce carcinogens.


Not quite accurate, and overheating oil isn't the only way to cause
problems. Using rancid oils is just as unhealthy. The primary issue with
lipids, though, is creating an environment for free radicals. Free
radicals cause a variety of damage through oxidation, which can lead to
cancer, heart attacks, etc.

i don't know if that is true or not.


Like I said, not quite.

and anyway, the sun is a carcinogen.


Too much sun is a danger, but so is too little. Don't throw the baby out
with the bathwater. That's one of the dangers vegan activists fall into
-- that because too much of something is bad, therefore any of it is bad.

the thing that you need to know about hydrognated oils and fats is that
hydrognation changes the molecular structure and our bodies don't like the
new shape and can't sucessfully use them.


That, too, is not quite right. The body is able to use transfats just as
it uses other fats. The problem with them is that they suppress HDL, the
good cholesterol, and elevate LDL.

you don't have to worry about this
if you are using cold pressed oils.


Nonsense. Monounsaturated oils lower LDL and elevate HDL. This is
beneficial in moderating serum cholesterol levels.

because oils can be extracted using
chemicals and alchol which i have read leave traces in the oil.


That's BS. Solvents used for extracting oils (usually hexane) are
removed by heating the oil. Pseudoscientific ninnies object to that
heating, but it's within ~100 degrees F of the temperatures reached in
mechanical (not so cold in reality) pressing.

just use the
good stuff and stay away from anything that you can't tell what it is and
everyone will be O.K.


That's not the best of advice.

this is also why i am a little leary of splenda which is altered sugar.


Why would that make you leary? I'm sure you eat processed foods of some
sort. Those are all altered in varying degrees. Everything around you is
"altered."
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Old 07-08-2005, 07:15 PM
cricket
 
Posts: n/a
Default

you generally confuse me. I am trying to find the nugget of truths in your
comments and it seems that no matter what anyone has said you have to
nay-say. I said that you were right and that it is improbable that you could
hydrogenate oils in your kitchen frying pan. I realize that you are the
village rabble rouser and sometimes I think that you may have a point but
then you confuse me. it is probably just me, I am a simple farm girl from
Quebec, we are esily confused.
(and in reference to my inability to spell, yes I think I am hot)

"usual suspect" wrote in message
...
wrote:
he is kinda right.


No, he isn't. His article was about transfats. It wasn't about how oils
breakdown in heat. His article had nothing to do with what he said about
heating oil. I was correcting his mistake -- common among vegans and
other nitwits -- that heating turns common vegetable oils into transfats.

i have also heard that heating oils too high can produce carcinogens.


Not quite accurate, and overheating oil isn't the only way to cause
problems. Using rancid oils is just as unhealthy. The primary issue with
lipids, though, is creating an environment for free radicals. Free
radicals cause a variety of damage through oxidation, which can lead to
cancer, heart attacks, etc.

i don't know if that is true or not.


Like I said, not quite.

and anyway, the sun is a carcinogen.


Too much sun is a danger, but so is too little. Don't throw the baby out
with the bathwater. That's one of the dangers vegan activists fall into
-- that because too much of something is bad, therefore any of it is bad.

the thing that you need to know about hydrognated oils and fats is that
hydrognation changes the molecular structure and our bodies don't like

the
new shape and can't sucessfully use them.


That, too, is not quite right. The body is able to use transfats just as
it uses other fats. The problem with them is that they suppress HDL, the
good cholesterol, and elevate LDL.

you don't have to worry about this
if you are using cold pressed oils.


Nonsense. Monounsaturated oils lower LDL and elevate HDL. This is
beneficial in moderating serum cholesterol levels.

because oils can be extracted using
chemicals and alchol which i have read leave traces in the oil.


That's BS. Solvents used for extracting oils (usually hexane) are
removed by heating the oil. Pseudoscientific ninnies object to that
heating, but it's within ~100 degrees F of the temperatures reached in
mechanical (not so cold in reality) pressing.

just use the
good stuff and stay away from anything that you can't tell what it is

and
everyone will be O.K.


That's not the best of advice.

this is also why i am a little leary of splenda which is altered sugar.


Why would that make you leary? I'm sure you eat processed foods of some
sort. Those are all altered in varying degrees. Everything around you is
"altered."





  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-08-2005, 07:27 PM
usual suspect
 
Posts: n/a
Default

cricket wrote:
you generally confuse me.


Tell me specifically what confuses you.

I am trying to find the nugget of truths in your
comments


It's easier than you suggest.

and it seems that no matter what anyone has said you have to
nay-say.


No, not true.

I said that you were right and that it is improbable that you could
hydrogenate oils in your kitchen frying pan.


That isn't what you said. You may have *thought* that, but you wrote,
"he is kinda right." I didn't know if you meant that I'm "kinda right"
or if the Bumbling Twit is. I assumed the latter. I apologize if you
meant I'm right -- and there's no "kinda" about it.

I realize that you are the
village rabble rouser


No. I just insist that people be honest about things. That's all.

and sometimes I think that you may have a point


Just sometimes?

but then you confuse me.


I can only help clear things up if you tell me what's confusing you.

it is probably just me,


Miscommunication is always possible here, just as I'd assumed you meant
Bob was "kinda right" when he was completely wrong.

I am a simple farm girl from
Quebec, we are esily confused.


Tip: Ask questions when something confuses you.

(and in reference to my inability to spell, yes I think I am hot)


Do other people agree with you about that?

he is kinda right.


No, he isn't. His article was about transfats. It wasn't about how oils
breakdown in heat. His article had nothing to do with what he said about
heating oil. I was correcting his mistake -- common among vegans and
other nitwits -- that heating turns common vegetable oils into transfats.


i have also heard that heating oils too high can produce carcinogens.


Not quite accurate, and overheating oil isn't the only way to cause
problems. Using rancid oils is just as unhealthy. The primary issue with
lipids, though, is creating an environment for free radicals. Free
radicals cause a variety of damage through oxidation, which can lead to
cancer, heart attacks, etc.


i don't know if that is true or not.


Like I said, not quite.


and anyway, the sun is a carcinogen.


Too much sun is a danger, but so is too little. Don't throw the baby out
with the bathwater. That's one of the dangers vegan activists fall into
-- that because too much of something is bad, therefore any of it is bad.


the thing that you need to know about hydrognated oils and fats is that
hydrognation changes the molecular structure and our bodies don't like


the

new shape and can't sucessfully use them.


That, too, is not quite right. The body is able to use transfats just as
it uses other fats. The problem with them is that they suppress HDL, the
good cholesterol, and elevate LDL.


you don't have to worry about this
if you are using cold pressed oils.


Nonsense. Monounsaturated oils lower LDL and elevate HDL. This is
beneficial in moderating serum cholesterol levels.


because oils can be extracted using
chemicals and alchol which i have read leave traces in the oil.


That's BS. Solvents used for extracting oils (usually hexane) are
removed by heating the oil. Pseudoscientific ninnies object to that
heating, but it's within ~100 degrees F of the temperatures reached in
mechanical (not so cold in reality) pressing.


just use the
good stuff and stay away from anything that you can't tell what it is


and

everyone will be O.K.


That's not the best of advice.


this is also why i am a little leary of splenda which is altered sugar.


Why would that make you leary? I'm sure you eat processed foods of some
sort. Those are all altered in varying degrees. Everything around you is
"altered."






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