Sourdough (rec.food.sourdough) Discussing the hobby or craft of baking with sourdough. We are not just a recipe group, Our charter is to discuss the care, feeding, and breeding of yeasts and lactobacilli that make up sourdough cultures.

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Old 21-11-2006, 03:09 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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I didn't follow the recipe exactly because I didn't notice the part about
putting the dough on a cloth and heating the pan first :-(

Also, I don't know what 'all purpose' flour is - I'm in Britain. We have
plain flour which is low gluten and used for cakes, biscuits (cookies),
sauces and the like and we have bread flour which is strong and high gluten
and used for bread, pasta etc. We also have self raising flour which is
plain flour with a chemical raising agent incorporated.

I used plain flour and instant yeast.

It looked really good with a nice thin crispy crust but didn't have the same
open crumbs as those described by others. The flavour was OK but not as good
as my usual bread. It reminded both of us of the commercial bread we used to
have when we were children (in the 1940s). It was far better than modern
commercial mass produced bread.

I'll try it once more, using my starter but I'd like to be put right on what
all purpose flour is first.

Here's the crumb - sorry for the poor picture.

http://i9.tinypic.com/3z6exza.jpg

TIA

Mary



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Old 21-11-2006, 03:36 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Mary Fisher wrote:
I'll try it once more, using my starter but I'd like to be put right on what
all purpose flour is first.

All-purpose flour is a blend of hard and soft wheats, yielding a flour
that can, at least in theory, be used for all-purposes.

It is soft enough to be used to make quick breads and cakes, but hard
enough to be used to make breads.

It tends to not rise as well as bread flour, but a number of bakers, and
I am one of them, feel it tends to produce a better tasting bread than
most bread flours.

Overall, all-purpose flour is about 10% protein. Bread flours tend to
be 12% and up, with lots of room on the "and up." However, one bread
flour I looked at had 10% protein and still rose well... so, as with
most generalities, there are exceptions.

Mike

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Old 21-11-2006, 03:53 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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"Mike Avery" wrote in message
news:mailman.8.1164123034.67839.rec.food.sourdough @mail.otherwhen.com...
Mary Fisher wrote:
I'll try it once more, using my starter but I'd like to be put right on
what all purpose flour is first.

All-purpose flour is a blend of hard and soft wheats, yielding a flour
that can, at least in theory, be used for all-purposes.


Thanks. We don't have that. I suppose I could mix my own but I think I'll
try using bread flour.

Not that the NYT recipe is any easier than my usual method if I think about
it!


Overall, all-purpose flour is about 10% protein. Bread flours tend to be
12% and up, with lots of room on the "and up." However, one bread flour I
looked at had 10% protein and still rose well... so, as with most
generalities, there are exceptions.


We're not told the protein content - I've never felt the need to know though
:-) We just trust the maker to produce something fit for its purpose and it
always has been in my experience.

Thanks again for replying,

Mary


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Old 22-11-2006, 02:51 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Mary Fisher wrote:

Thanks. We don't have that. I suppose I could mix my own but I think I'll
try using bread flour.


I expect that will work fine. The procedure does not seem to be at all
picky about type of flour.

Not that the NYT recipe is any easier than my usual method if I think about
it!


Different, not necessarily easier.

To me, the advantages are less time actually working with the dough, and
an excellent result with better crust than I've been able to achieve
using other methods. The disadvantage is the need to plan ahead and to
be available at specific times that are many hours in the future.
Although the initial rise time seems to also not be at all picky.
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Old 22-11-2006, 04:51 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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"Steve Bonine" wrote in message
...
Mary Fisher wrote:

Thanks. We don't have that. I suppose I could mix my own but I think I'll
try using bread flour.


I expect that will work fine. The procedure does not seem to be at all
picky about type of flour.

Not that the NYT recipe is any easier than my usual method if I think
about it!


Different, not necessarily easier.


Yes, but I thought that it was being promoted as easy, perhaps I
misunderstood.

To me, the advantages are less time actually working with the dough, and
an excellent result with better crust than I've been able to achieve using
other methods.


I think that's because it's baked in an enclosed and steamy environment.
I've had the same beautiful thin crisp crust by inverting a soaked unglazed
clay pot over a free form loaf. Every time I'm going to see my potter I
intend asking him to make me some and every time I see him I forget :-)

The disadvantage is the need to plan ahead and to be available at specific
times that are many hours in the future.


Yes, and organising myself is something I'm not good at.

I shall try again but I think I'll go back to my very forgiving sourdough
bread - especially in the warmer months when I'll be using my bread oven.
Timing IS important with that. another problem with the NYT recipe, for me,
is that it makes a very big loaf. We eat a lot of bread but there's still a
third left after two meals. It would be good for when the family comes
though. Hmm - perhaps I'll make one and freeze it ...

Mary




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Old 22-11-2006, 05:13 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default And another ... and help needed please

Mary Fisher wrote:

another problem with the NYT recipe, for me, is that it makes a very big loaf.


grin I was just thinking that I wished it made a bigger loaf . . .

Has anyone tried doubling the recipe and making one large loaf? I
suspect the results would be disappointing, but maybe not. I rather
like the ratio of crust in the original recipe, and having a loaf twice
as big would probably destroy that.
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Old 22-11-2006, 07:53 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default And another ... and help needed please

Steve Bonine wrote:

Mary Fisher wrote:

another problem with the NYT recipe, for me, is that it makes a very
big loaf.



grin I was just thinking that I wished it made a bigger loaf . . .

Has anyone tried doubling the recipe and making one large loaf? I
suspect the results would be disappointing, but maybe not. I rather
like the ratio of crust in the original recipe, and having a loaf twice
as big would probably destroy that.


Bigger pot, should do it, along with the increased dough mass...

Dave
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Old 22-11-2006, 08:29 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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"Dave Bell" wrote in message
. com...
Steve Bonine wrote:

Mary Fisher wrote:

another problem with the NYT recipe, for me, is that it makes a very big
loaf.



grin I was just thinking that I wished it made a bigger loaf . . .

Has anyone tried doubling the recipe and making one large loaf? I
suspect the results would be disappointing, but maybe not. I rather like
the ratio of crust in the original recipe, and having a loaf twice as big
would probably destroy that.


Bigger pot, should do it, along with the increased dough mass...


There are only two of us and old - it's awful, you'll find that as you get
older your appetite lessens :-((

Mary


Dave



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Old 22-11-2006, 11:01 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default cranberry walnut rolls w/ NYT recipe

I just made some great cranberry walnut rolls for Thanksgiving (made 12
- only 9 left - oh welll) using the NYT recipe.

Here's the recipe:

took basic NYT recipe w/ salt, 1/4 tsp yeast, 3 cups of flour, and 1
5/8 cup water.

Let it rise for 18 hours.

punched dough down and spread 2 tbsp of butter on dough, followed by 3
tbsp of sugar, 3/4 cup chopped dried cranberries and 1/3 cup chopped
walnuts. Kneaded mixture together on well floured board and divided
into 12 pieces. Dusted each of the pieces into flour and placed them
in a 9 x 13 inch pyrex pan. Rose for about 3 more hours (about 1 1/2 -
not double.

Cooked in 425 degree oven for 30 minutes until browned.

Came out with a great open crumb / very chewy crust and slightly sweet.



Hope some others try this.

Mike D

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Old 23-11-2006, 10:29 AM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default cranberry walnut rolls w/ NYT recipe

Hi Mike. Thanks for this. I've printed it out and may try it later.

Two questions. Did you bake with a lid on the pyrex pan? Our local
store sells those dried cranberries (that look basically like largish
dark red raisins) both sweetened and unsweetened. Which where yours?

Eric


mjd wrote:
I just made some great cranberry walnut rolls for Thanksgiving (made 12
- only 9 left - oh welll) using the NYT recipe.

Here's the recipe:

took basic NYT recipe w/ salt, 1/4 tsp yeast, 3 cups of flour, and 1
5/8 cup water.

Let it rise for 18 hours.

punched dough down and spread 2 tbsp of butter on dough, followed by 3
tbsp of sugar, 3/4 cup chopped dried cranberries and 1/3 cup chopped
walnuts. Kneaded mixture together on well floured board and divided
into 12 pieces. Dusted each of the pieces into flour and placed them
in a 9 x 13 inch pyrex pan. Rose for about 3 more hours (about 1 1/2 -
not double.

Cooked in 425 degree oven for 30 minutes until browned.

Came out with a great open crumb / very chewy crust and slightly sweet.



Hope some others try this.

Mike D




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Old 23-11-2006, 12:19 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
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Default cranberry walnut rolls w/ NYT recipe


"mjd" wrote in message
ps.com...
I just made some great cranberry walnut rolls for Thanksgiving (made 12
- only 9 left - oh welll) using the NYT recipe.

Here's the recipe:

took basic NYT recipe w/ salt, 1/4 tsp yeast, 3 cups of flour, and 1
5/8 cup water.

Let it rise for 18 hours.

punched dough down and spread 2 tbsp of butter on dough, followed by 3
tbsp of sugar, 3/4 cup chopped dried cranberries and 1/3 cup chopped
walnuts. Kneaded mixture together on well floured board and divided
into 12 pieces. Dusted each of the pieces into flour and placed them
in a 9 x 13 inch pyrex pan. Rose for about 3 more hours (about 1 1/2 -
not double.

Cooked in 425 degree oven for 30 minutes until browned.

Came out with a great open crumb / very chewy crust and slightly sweet.



Hope some others try this.


I might well - thanks!

Mary


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Old 25-11-2006, 09:30 PM posted to rec.food.sourdough
mjd mjd is offline
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Default cranberry walnut rolls w/ NYT recipe

Hi Eric -

I baked without a cover on the pyrex dish and w/ no steam in oven as I
didn't want a crusty exterior on these sweeter rolls. I used sweetened
dried cranberries instead of the unsweetened ones (I din't know you
could even purchase these). I would certainly try the unsweetened
ones instead but chop them up a bit and mix them with sugar (add an
ounce of sugar per ounce of dried cranberries) before adding them to
the bread.

Good luck.

Mike D.

Breadtopia wrote:
Hi Mike. Thanks for this. I've printed it out and may try it later.

Two questions. Did you bake with a lid on the pyrex pan? Our local
store sells those dried cranberries (that look basically like largish
dark red raisins) both sweetened and unsweetened. Which where yours?

Eric


mjd wrote:
I just made some great cranberry walnut rolls for Thanksgiving (made 12
- only 9 left - oh welll) using the NYT recipe.

Here's the recipe:

took basic NYT recipe w/ salt, 1/4 tsp yeast, 3 cups of flour, and 1
5/8 cup water.

Let it rise for 18 hours.

punched dough down and spread 2 tbsp of butter on dough, followed by 3
tbsp of sugar, 3/4 cup chopped dried cranberries and 1/3 cup chopped
walnuts. Kneaded mixture together on well floured board and divided
into 12 pieces. Dusted each of the pieces into flour and placed them
in a 9 x 13 inch pyrex pan. Rose for about 3 more hours (about 1 1/2 -
not double.

Cooked in 425 degree oven for 30 minutes until browned.

Came out with a great open crumb / very chewy crust and slightly sweet.



Hope some others try this.

Mike D




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