Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Alison
 
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Default Haggis

This is a wonder all over the world. Some people even think it is an animal !!

Very traditional.
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Helen McElroy
 
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The whole animal thing is the fault of Scots abroad.
The thing is to see how far you get in the story before your audiences
stops believing you.

The lesser spotted anti-clockwise haggis generally does that. Is such fun.

Did you know that a traditional haggis is illegal in the states as the
FDA banned the lights (lungs) being used as an ingredient years ago amid
fears of TB spreading to humans. People smuggle them in for Burn's night
apparently.

Is very tasty as a stuffing in turkey at Christmas.

Alison wrote:
> This is a wonder all over the world. Some people even think it is an animal !!
>
> Very traditional.

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Lazarus Cooke
 
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In article >, Helen
McElroy > wrote:

> The whole animal thing is the fault of Scots abroad.
> The thing is to see how far you get in the story before your audiences
> stops believing you.
>
> The lesser spotted anti-clockwise haggis generally does that. Is such fun.
>
> Did you know that a traditional haggis is illegal in the states as the
> FDA banned the lights (lungs) being used as an ingredient years ago amid
> fears of TB spreading to humans. People smuggle them in for Burn's night
> apparently.
>
> Is very tasty as a stuffing in turkey at Christmas.
>
> Alison wrote:
> > This is a wonder all over the world. Some people even think it is an animal !!
> >
> > Very traditional.

What I like about it is that it's still a people's food. You can buy it
in any chip shop. In my experience, poor food made from cheap
ingredients by peasants over a long period generally tastes pretty
good. Haggis and Cullen Skink are examples. (Also both very well
balanced nutritionally!)

L

--
Remover the rock from the email address
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Haggis



Lazarus Cooke wrote:

> In article >, Helen
> McElroy > wrote:
>
> > The whole animal thing is the fault of Scots abroad.
> > The thing is to see how far you get in the story before your audiences
> > stops believing you.
> >
> > The lesser spotted anti-clockwise haggis generally does that. Is such fun.
> >
> > Did you know that a traditional haggis is illegal in the states as the
> > FDA banned the lights (lungs) being used as an ingredient years ago amid
> > fears of TB spreading to humans. People smuggle them in for Burn's night
> > apparently.
> >
> > Is very tasty as a stuffing in turkey at Christmas.
> >
> > Alison wrote:
> > > This is a wonder all over the world. Some people even think it is an animal !!
> > >
> > > Very traditional.

> What I like about it is that it's still a people's food. You can buy it
> in any chip shop. In my experience, poor food made from cheap
> ingredients by peasants over a long period generally tastes pretty
> good. Haggis and Cullen Skink are examples. (Also both very well
> balanced nutritionally!)
>
> L
>
> --
> Remover the rock from the email address


We eat both here regularly: There's a recipe for haggis on my web site. Look under
Scottish recipes... http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk

Kate (Sig line AWOL!)



  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Haggis



Lazarus Cooke wrote:

> In article >, Helen
> McElroy > wrote:
>
> > The whole animal thing is the fault of Scots abroad.
> > The thing is to see how far you get in the story before your audiences
> > stops believing you.
> >
> > The lesser spotted anti-clockwise haggis generally does that. Is such fun.
> >
> > Did you know that a traditional haggis is illegal in the states as the
> > FDA banned the lights (lungs) being used as an ingredient years ago amid
> > fears of TB spreading to humans. People smuggle them in for Burn's night
> > apparently.
> >
> > Is very tasty as a stuffing in turkey at Christmas.
> >
> > Alison wrote:
> > > This is a wonder all over the world. Some people even think it is an animal !!
> > >
> > > Very traditional.

> What I like about it is that it's still a people's food. You can buy it
> in any chip shop. In my experience, poor food made from cheap
> ingredients by peasants over a long period generally tastes pretty
> good. Haggis and Cullen Skink are examples. (Also both very well
> balanced nutritionally!)
>
> L
>
> --
> Remover the rock from the email address


We eat both here regularly: There's a recipe for haggis on my web site.
Look under
Scottish recipes... http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk

Kate (Sig line AWOL!)


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Olivers
 
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Default Haggis

Lazarus Cooke muttered....


> What I like about it is that it's still a people's food. You can buy
> it in any chip shop. In my experience, poor food made from cheap
> ingredients by peasants over a long period generally tastes pretty
> good. Haggis and Cullen Skink are examples. (Also both very well
> balanced nutritionally!)
>


While I find haggis quite palatable (and have even eaten a couple of
versions I could call good, one even better), I'm not sure that it's a
"people's food" at this point in the Scots' national culinary landscape.

There are a number of dishes (of which haggis is one) which deserve a
better fate than what likely awaits them....

Scrapple (and folks who debate the merits of a Philly Cheesesteak are
unlearned barbarians likely to have never eaten good scrapple).

Menudo (para la cruda) and the plainer version, simple posole, when made
with "real" dry hominy.

Spoonbread

"Cheese Grits" (at least the souffle-ish versions, dome of which actually
have leavening)

TMO
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Haggis

Olivers wrote:
>
> Lazarus Cooke muttered....
>
>
> > What I like about it is that it's still a people's food. You can buy
> > it in any chip shop. In my experience, poor food made from cheap
> > ingredients by peasants over a long period generally tastes pretty
> > good. Haggis and Cullen Skink are examples. (Also both very well
> > balanced nutritionally!)
> >

>
> While I find haggis quite palatable (and have even eaten a couple of
> versions I could call good, one even better), I'm not sure that it's a
> "people's food" at this point in the Scots' national culinary landscape.


Are you based in Scotland? If not, rest assured that last time I
looked, it was readily available in both supermarkets and butcher's
shops, and eaten regularly. If you are, then I don't know where you are
looking, but while most folk don't make there own, it seems to be eaten
as regularly as Lorne saussage and butteries! Or kippers, Scotch pies
and Arbroath smokies...

> There are a number of dishes (of which haggis is one) which deserve a
> better fate than what likely awaits them....
>
> Scrapple (and folks who debate the merits of a Philly Cheesesteak are
> unlearned barbarians likely to have never eaten good scrapple).
>
> Menudo (para la cruda) and the plainer version, simple posole, when made
> with "real" dry hominy.
>
> Spoonbread
>
> "Cheese Grits" (at least the souffle-ish versions, dome of which actually
> have leavening)
>
> TMO


One day I will save enough WW points to make cornbread...
--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Olivers
 
Posts: n/a
Default Haggis

Kate Dicey muttered....


>
> Are you based in Scotland? If not, rest assured that last time I
> looked, it was readily available in both supermarkets and butcher's
> shops, and eaten regularly. If you are, then I don't know where you
> are looking, but while most folk don't make there own, it seems to be
> eaten as regularly as Lorne saussage and butteries! Or kippers,
> Scotch pies and Arbroath smokies...
>


While I'm in Scotland for a only few days every two years, my comparison
standard of two decades back, a two month period traveling about the
country left me believing that haggis (and several other traditional
dishes, Scottish and Aglo-S) were rapidly reaching the state of being
quaint survivors of a culture and cuisine cherished by a few and unknown to
many.

There was visible haggis around, but the percentage of the population who
seemed to eat it regularly had diminished to tourists, traditionalists and
the hardy band of folks to whom it appealed in a culinary sense.

While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would doubt
whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland would eat haggis
more than once in 30 day period (or at any time other than a special
celebratory occasion). Even that represents more folks than the percentage
of Pennsylvanians who eat scrapple regularly.

.....but maybe MickyD's will put a Haggis McMuffin up on the menu board.


TMO

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Henriette Kress
 
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Olivers wrote:

> While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would doubt
> whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland would eat haggis
> more than once in 30 day period


So when's the last time you've eaten sausage? Roast beef? Prime rib?
Liver? Kidneys? MickeyD's?

Henriette

--
Henriette Kress, AHG * * * * * * * * * * *Helsinki, Finland
Henriette's herbal homepage: http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peggy
 
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Lazarus Cooke wrote:

> In article >, Helen
> McElroy > wrote:
>
>
>>The whole animal thing is the fault of Scots abroad.
>>The thing is to see how far you get in the story before your audiences
>>stops believing you.
>>
>>The lesser spotted anti-clockwise haggis generally does that. Is such fun.
>>
>>Did you know that a traditional haggis is illegal in the states as the
>>FDA banned the lights (lungs) being used as an ingredient years ago amid
>>fears of TB spreading to humans. People smuggle them in for Burn's night
>>apparently.
>>
>>Is very tasty as a stuffing in turkey at Christmas.
>>
>>Alison wrote:
>>
>>>This is a wonder all over the world. Some people even think it is an animal !!
>>>
>>>Very traditional.

>
> What I like about it is that it's still a people's food. You can buy it
> in any chip shop. In my experience, poor food made from cheap
> ingredients by peasants over a long period generally tastes pretty
> good. Haggis and Cullen Skink are examples. (Also both very well
> balanced nutritionally!)
>
> L
>


Lazarus -

What's cullen skink?

Peg



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Opinicus
 
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"Peggy" > wrote in message
...

> What's cullen skink?

http://www.rampantscotland.com/recip...ipe_cullen.htm

--
Bob
Kanyak's Doghouse
http://kanyak.com

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Colin L
 
Posts: n/a
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"Olivers" > wrote in message
...
> Kate Dicey muttered....
>
>
> >
> > Are you based in Scotland? If not, rest assured that last time I
> > looked, it was readily available in both supermarkets and butcher's
> > shops, and eaten regularly. If you are, then I don't know where you
> > are looking, but while most folk don't make there own, it seems to be
> > eaten as regularly as Lorne saussage and butteries! Or kippers,
> > Scotch pies and Arbroath smokies...
> >

>
> While I'm in Scotland for a only few days every two years, my comparison
> standard of two decades back, a two month period traveling about the
> country left me believing that haggis (and several other traditional
> dishes, Scottish and Aglo-S) were rapidly reaching the state of being
> quaint survivors of a culture and cuisine cherished by a few and unknown

to
> many.
>
> There was visible haggis around, but the percentage of the population who
> seemed to eat it regularly had diminished to tourists, traditionalists and
> the hardy band of folks to whom it appealed in a culinary sense.
>
> While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would doubt
> whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland would eat

haggis
> more than once in 30 day period (or at any time other than a special
> celebratory occasion). Even that represents more folks than the

percentage
> of Pennsylvanians who eat scrapple regularly.


Well, within less than 10 minutes walk of where I live* I have seen:
A budget style supermarket selling haggis
A frozen foods supermarket selling haggis, frozen
Local corner shops selling haggis, tinned
Local butcher shops selling haggis, made on the premises
Two large chain supermarkets selling haggis, frozen, tinned and fresh
A speciality organic shop selling, yes, organic haggis, and vegetarian
haggis
A vegetarian shop selling vegetarian haggis
An open 24 hour corner shop that sells vegetarian haggis stuffed samosas
A least three traditional chippies selling haggis suppers
A chinese takeaway that sells haggis suppers
A little further afield sees the pattern more or less repeated, with
restaurants getting on the act. Not far from here I can get a portion of
haggis pakora at an Indian restaurant.

I see people buy haggis all the time. I wouldn't say it was ubiquitous or
eaten every day but a "quaint survivor"?

Colin L

*In Glasgow, on the border between a nice part of town and a not so nice
part of town


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
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Peggy wrote:
>
> Lazarus Cooke wrote:
>
> > In article >, Helen
> > McElroy > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>The whole animal thing is the fault of Scots abroad.
> >>The thing is to see how far you get in the story before your audiences
> >>stops believing you.
> >>
> >>The lesser spotted anti-clockwise haggis generally does that. Is such fun.
> >>
> >>Did you know that a traditional haggis is illegal in the states as the
> >>FDA banned the lights (lungs) being used as an ingredient years ago amid
> >>fears of TB spreading to humans. People smuggle them in for Burn's night
> >>apparently.
> >>
> >>Is very tasty as a stuffing in turkey at Christmas.
> >>
> >>Alison wrote:
> >>
> >>>This is a wonder all over the world. Some people even think it is an animal !!
> >>>
> >>>Very traditional.

> >
> > What I like about it is that it's still a people's food. You can buy it
> > in any chip shop. In my experience, poor food made from cheap
> > ingredients by peasants over a long period generally tastes pretty
> > good. Haggis and Cullen Skink are examples. (Also both very well
> > balanced nutritionally!)
> >
> > L
> >

>
> Lazarus -
>
> What's cullen skink?
>
> Peg


One of my native soups! Made with milk, smoked haddock, neeps and
tatties. Meal in a bowl.
--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
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Colin L wrote:
>
> "Olivers" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Kate Dicey muttered....
> >
> >
> > >
> > > Are you based in Scotland? If not, rest assured that last time I
> > > looked, it was readily available in both supermarkets and butcher's
> > > shops, and eaten regularly. If you are, then I don't know where you
> > > are looking, but while most folk don't make there own, it seems to be
> > > eaten as regularly as Lorne saussage and butteries! Or kippers,
> > > Scotch pies and Arbroath smokies...
> > >

> >
> > While I'm in Scotland for a only few days every two years, my comparison
> > standard of two decades back, a two month period traveling about the
> > country left me believing that haggis (and several other traditional
> > dishes, Scottish and Aglo-S) were rapidly reaching the state of being
> > quaint survivors of a culture and cuisine cherished by a few and unknown

> to
> > many.
> >
> > There was visible haggis around, but the percentage of the population who
> > seemed to eat it regularly had diminished to tourists, traditionalists and
> > the hardy band of folks to whom it appealed in a culinary sense.
> >
> > While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would doubt
> > whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland would eat

> haggis
> > more than once in 30 day period (or at any time other than a special
> > celebratory occasion). Even that represents more folks than the

> percentage
> > of Pennsylvanians who eat scrapple regularly.

>
> Well, within less than 10 minutes walk of where I live* I have seen:
> A budget style supermarket selling haggis
> A frozen foods supermarket selling haggis, frozen
> Local corner shops selling haggis, tinned
> Local butcher shops selling haggis, made on the premises
> Two large chain supermarkets selling haggis, frozen, tinned and fresh
> A speciality organic shop selling, yes, organic haggis, and vegetarian
> haggis
> A vegetarian shop selling vegetarian haggis
> An open 24 hour corner shop that sells vegetarian haggis stuffed samosas
> A least three traditional chippies selling haggis suppers
> A chinese takeaway that sells haggis suppers
> A little further afield sees the pattern more or less repeated, with
> restaurants getting on the act. Not far from here I can get a portion of
> haggis pakora at an Indian restaurant.
>
> I see people buy haggis all the time. I wouldn't say it was ubiquitous or
> eaten every day but a "quaint survivor"?
>
> Colin L
>
> *In Glasgow, on the border between a nice part of town and a not so nice
> part of town


And our local Sainsbury's has it here in Kent - all year round, too, not
just in January!
--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
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Opinicus wrote:
>
> "Peggy" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > What's cullen skink?

> http://www.rampantscotland.com/recip...ipe_cullen.htm


The potato doesn't have to be mashed: in some areas, you drop them in in
lumps and let bits disintegrate in the soup, so it thickens it and you
get the lumps too. My granny used to just squeeze them a bit as she
dropped them in, so the lumps were all different sizes and shapes!

In some areas, diced or grated neeps are also added. It's like most
other peasant recipes: a basic idea with slight regional variations.

A hotel I worked in on the Fife coast did a very local variation I
havent seen elswhere, made with fresh partons. After completion, it was
pureed.

--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!


  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Olivers
 
Posts: n/a
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Henriette Kress muttered....

> Olivers wrote:
>
>> While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would
>> doubt whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland
>> would eat haggis more than once in 30 day period

>
> So when's the last time you've eaten sausage?


Yesterday, and several times in last couple of weeks, but that includes a
wide sprectrum, all the way from hard salami through Cajun andouille,
boudin, chorizo (Mexican) and "country" - no Blood Pudding, simply not
available, but Souse/Head Cheese in the deli case.

Roast beef?

Within a couple of weeks, excluding prime rib whaich was last Monday

Prime rib?

See above.

> Liver?


Day before yesterday (Chicken liver)...
Beef (calf) Liver within last 30 days


Kidneys?

No, but within 60 days, on toast with Madeira


MickeyD's?

Saturday afternoon while driving back from Shreveport, but only a Coke.

>
> Henriette
>

After reading of the wide availability of haggis in Scotland and even
throughout the Scuppered H'aisles, I'm convinced it remains a dietary
and cultural fixture, but I'm wondering if its regular consumption among
the young has not declined to special occasions, the fate of many
traditional foods here in the US.

I suppose that the demise of plum pudding here was to be expected, but even
some common vegestables now show up only in "ethnic" restaurants.

For all the criticism of US diets here, the US fat kid syndrome, I was
interested to hear a news story recently announcing the British youngsters
were growing fatter at an amazing rate, likely to outstrip US obesity
soon. Too much haggis, I suppose...

TMO
  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
deiusenet
 
Posts: n/a
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Olivers > wrote in
:

<snips>

> After reading of the wide availability of haggis in Scotland and even
> throughout the Scuppered H'aisles, I'm convinced it remains a dietary
> and cultural fixture, but I'm wondering if its regular consumption
> among the young has not declined to special occasions, the fate of
> many traditional foods here in the US.
>

<and more snips>

> TMO
>


A young (vegetarian) Glaswegian of my acquaintance assures me that his best
friend really, really likes haggis pakora...

He didn't have any comment on the vegetarian version, though, when I
forwarded him the thread...

d


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peggy
 
Posts: n/a
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Kate Dicey wrote:

> Opinicus wrote:
>
>>"Peggy" > wrote in message
...
>>
>>
>>>What's cullen skink?

>>
>>http://www.rampantscotland.com/recip...ipe_cullen.htm

>
>
> The potato doesn't have to be mashed: in some areas, you drop them in in
> lumps and let bits disintegrate in the soup, so it thickens it and you
> get the lumps too. My granny used to just squeeze them a bit as she
> dropped them in, so the lumps were all different sizes and shapes!
>
> In some areas, diced or grated neeps are also added. It's like most
> other peasant recipes: a basic idea with slight regional variations.
>
> A hotel I worked in on the Fife coast did a very local variation I
> havent seen elswhere, made with fresh partons. After completion, it was
> pureed.
>


Kate -
I managed to figure out "neeps," but what are partons?
Peg

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
stephen
 
Posts: n/a
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"Kate Dicey" > wrote in message
...
> Colin L wrote:
> >
> > "Olivers" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Kate Dicey muttered....
> > >
> > >
> > > >
> > > > Are you based in Scotland? If not, rest assured that last time I
> > > > looked, it was readily available in both supermarkets and butcher's
> > > > shops, and eaten regularly. If you are, then I don't know where you
> > > > are looking, but while most folk don't make there own, it seems to

be
> > > > eaten as regularly as Lorne saussage and butteries! Or kippers,
> > > > Scotch pies and Arbroath smokies...
> > > >
> > >
> > > While I'm in Scotland for a only few days every two years, my

comparison
> > > standard of two decades back, a two month period traveling about the
> > > country left me believing that haggis (and several other traditional
> > > dishes, Scottish and Aglo-S) were rapidly reaching the state of being
> > > quaint survivors of a culture and cuisine cherished by a few and

unknown
> > to
> > > many.
> > >
> > > There was visible haggis around, but the percentage of the population

who
> > > seemed to eat it regularly had diminished to tourists, traditionalists

and
> > > the hardy band of folks to whom it appealed in a culinary sense.
> > >
> > > While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would

doubt
> > > whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland would eat

> > haggis
> > > more than once in 30 day period (or at any time other than a special
> > > celebratory occasion). Even that represents more folks than the

> > percentage
> > > of Pennsylvanians who eat scrapple regularly.

> >
> > Well, within less than 10 minutes walk of where I live* I have seen:
> > A budget style supermarket selling haggis
> > A frozen foods supermarket selling haggis, frozen
> > Local corner shops selling haggis, tinned
> > Local butcher shops selling haggis, made on the premises
> > Two large chain supermarkets selling haggis, frozen, tinned and fresh
> > A speciality organic shop selling, yes, organic haggis, and vegetarian
> > haggis
> > A vegetarian shop selling vegetarian haggis
> > An open 24 hour corner shop that sells vegetarian haggis stuffed samosas
> > A least three traditional chippies selling haggis suppers
> > A chinese takeaway that sells haggis suppers
> > A little further afield sees the pattern more or less repeated, with
> > restaurants getting on the act. Not far from here I can get a portion of
> > haggis pakora at an Indian restaurant.
> >
> > I see people buy haggis all the time. I wouldn't say it was ubiquitous

or
> > eaten every day but a "quaint survivor"?
> >
> > Colin L
> >
> > *In Glasgow, on the border between a nice part of town and a not so nice
> > part of town

>
> And our local Sainsbury's has it here in Kent - all year round, too, not
> just in January!


Hope it's not the same brand Tescos have which they call haggis but is made
with pork!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It doesn't even taste like the real thing.

Steve


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gretchen Beck
 
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According to the OED, it's a crab. So, a pureed crab soup (sounds yummy)

toodles, gretchen

--On Tuesday, February 24, 2004 1:33 PM -0500 Peggy
> wrote:

> I managed to figure out "neeps," but what are partons?







  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
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Olivers wrote:

> Henriette Kress muttered....
>
> > Olivers wrote:
> >
> >> While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would
> >> doubt whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland
> >> would eat haggis more than once in 30 day period

> >
> > So when's the last time you've eaten sausage?

>
> Yesterday, and several times in last couple of weeks, but that includes a
> wide sprectrum, all the way from hard salami through Cajun andouille,
> boudin, chorizo (Mexican) and "country" - no Blood Pudding, simply not
> available, but Souse/Head Cheese in the deli case.
>
> Roast beef?
>
> Within a couple of weeks, excluding prime rib whaich was last Monday
>
> Prime rib?
>
> See above.
>
> > Liver?

>
> Day before yesterday (Chicken liver)...
> Beef (calf) Liver within last 30 days
>
> Kidneys?
>
> No, but within 60 days, on toast with Madeira
>
> MickeyD's?
>
> Saturday afternoon while driving back from Shreveport, but only a Coke.
>
> >
> > Henriette
> >

> After reading of the wide availability of haggis in Scotland and even
> throughout the Scuppered H'aisles, I'm convinced it remains a dietary
> and cultural fixture, but I'm wondering if its regular consumption among
> the young has not declined to special occasions, the fate of many
> traditional foods here in the US.
>
> I suppose that the demise of plum pudding here was to be expected, but even
> some common vegestables now show up only in "ethnic" restaurants.
>
> For all the criticism of US diets here, the US fat kid syndrome, I was
> interested to hear a news story recently announcing the British youngsters
> were growing fatter at an amazing rate, likely to outstrip US obesity
> soon. Too much haggis, I suppose...
>
> TMO


Nope: not enough running about! And too many sweets and crisps and the
like... My son has these things strictly rationed. Sweets once a week
(he
bought a bag of toffees last time, and half of them are still in the bag
10
days later! He's getting very good!). His school has also introduced a
no
sweets at break or lunchtime policy: they have to have healthy snacks
like
cereal bars or fruit.

There was a good article on a Kid's TV program here a few weeks back
that
showed the difference in the amount of activity (walking to school.
playing
outside after school, and the like) of kids now and kids 40 years ago,
the
difference in their school lunches ( typically meat and two veg, with
gravy,
followed by sponge pud and custard then, compared with pizza and chips
and ice
ream now), and the difference in the amount of PE they do (typically 4
hours
then and less than two now, mostly due to the constraints of the
National
Curriculum). It also detailed the number of sugary drinks (Cola and the
like)
drunk then and now, and the sweets and snacks consumed per day... It
was quite
horrifying! Kids seem to be eating in excess of 2000 kcalories per day
and
doing less than half the running about that they did when I was my son's
age!

I see a bit of this with my son: he's an only, and none of his friends
live
close enough for post school playing most days of the week, but we do
walk the
mile home (I am a non driver). At his age (9), while I had a 10 mile
bus
journey to school, I also had 3 siblings and loads of friends living
close by,
and no TV (At his age I lived in Malta, courtesy of the RAF). We also
had an
ultra safe environment to play in (Maltese adults tended to treat all
kids as
their own precious and doted on grand kids!), and plenty of warm salt
water...
No need for a telly! Our lifestyle at the time was more like a hot
version of
Swallows and Amazons than anything else.

My son does go to Judo twice a week, and cubs one night, so he does have
a more
active life than a lot of kids I see. I still feel this isn't quite
enough.
There isn't a huge amount of spare flesh on him, but he could be fitter.

Just today there was a small article in the Independant saying that
children's
waist sizes had grown by 4 cm or two clothing sizes in the last 20
years.
Girls are getting fatter quicker than boys, too. The incidence of Type
2
diabetes in kids is also increasing at alarming rates. The only
solution is to
eat a more ballanced diet (more fresh food, more fruit and veg), fewer
calories
(however you like to count them), and more physical activity.
--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Haggis

Peggy wrote:

> Kate Dicey wrote:
>
> > Opinicus wrote:
> >
> >>"Peggy" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>
> >>
> >>>What's cullen skink?
> >>
> >>http://www.rampantscotland.com/recip...ipe_cullen.htm

> >
> >
> > The potato doesn't have to be mashed: in some areas, you drop them in in
> > lumps and let bits disintegrate in the soup, so it thickens it and you
> > get the lumps too. My granny used to just squeeze them a bit as she
> > dropped them in, so the lumps were all different sizes and shapes!
> >
> > In some areas, diced or grated neeps are also added. It's like most
> > other peasant recipes: a basic idea with slight regional variations.
> >
> > A hotel I worked in on the Fife coast did a very local variation I
> > havent seen elswhere, made with fresh partons. After completion, it was
> > pureed.
> >

>
> Kate -
> I managed to figure out "neeps," but what are partons?
> Peg


Oops! Sorry! Crabs!


--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
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Default Haggis

stephen wrote:

> "Kate Dicey" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Colin L wrote:
> > >
> > > "Olivers" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > Kate Dicey muttered....
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > Are you based in Scotland? If not, rest assured that last time I
> > > > > looked, it was readily available in both supermarkets and butcher's
> > > > > shops, and eaten regularly. If you are, then I don't know where you
> > > > > are looking, but while most folk don't make there own, it seems to

> be
> > > > > eaten as regularly as Lorne saussage and butteries! Or kippers,
> > > > > Scotch pies and Arbroath smokies...
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > While I'm in Scotland for a only few days every two years, my

> comparison
> > > > standard of two decades back, a two month period traveling about the
> > > > country left me believing that haggis (and several other traditional
> > > > dishes, Scottish and Aglo-S) were rapidly reaching the state of being
> > > > quaint survivors of a culture and cuisine cherished by a few and

> unknown
> > > to
> > > > many.
> > > >
> > > > There was visible haggis around, but the percentage of the population

> who
> > > > seemed to eat it regularly had diminished to tourists, traditionalists

> and
> > > > the hardy band of folks to whom it appealed in a culinary sense.
> > > >
> > > > While I would be open to challenge (and gladly accept it), I would

> doubt
> > > > whether more than 5% of the current population of Scotland would eat
> > > haggis
> > > > more than once in 30 day period (or at any time other than a special
> > > > celebratory occasion). Even that represents more folks than the
> > > percentage
> > > > of Pennsylvanians who eat scrapple regularly.
> > >
> > > Well, within less than 10 minutes walk of where I live* I have seen:
> > > A budget style supermarket selling haggis
> > > A frozen foods supermarket selling haggis, frozen
> > > Local corner shops selling haggis, tinned
> > > Local butcher shops selling haggis, made on the premises
> > > Two large chain supermarkets selling haggis, frozen, tinned and fresh
> > > A speciality organic shop selling, yes, organic haggis, and vegetarian
> > > haggis
> > > A vegetarian shop selling vegetarian haggis
> > > An open 24 hour corner shop that sells vegetarian haggis stuffed samosas
> > > A least three traditional chippies selling haggis suppers
> > > A chinese takeaway that sells haggis suppers
> > > A little further afield sees the pattern more or less repeated, with
> > > restaurants getting on the act. Not far from here I can get a portion of
> > > haggis pakora at an Indian restaurant.
> > >
> > > I see people buy haggis all the time. I wouldn't say it was ubiquitous

> or
> > > eaten every day but a "quaint survivor"?
> > >
> > > Colin L
> > >
> > > *In Glasgow, on the border between a nice part of town and a not so nice
> > > part of town

> >
> > And our local Sainsbury's has it here in Kent - all year round, too, not
> > just in January!

>
> Hope it's not the same brand Tescos have which they call haggis but is made
> with pork!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It doesn't even taste like the real thing.
>
> Steve


They tend to be, if you buy the plastic cased ones, but I have seen real
butchers ones there too. Waitrose had some proper haggises.

I must get a set of ingredients from my butcher: he is very traditional,
and
would be pleased to help.


--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default Haggis

On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 03:34:50 +0000, Kate Dicey
> wrote:

>Peggy wrote:
>
>> Kate Dicey wrote:
>>
>> > Opinicus wrote:
>> >
>> >>"Peggy" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>>What's cullen skink?
>> >>
>> >>http://www.rampantscotland.com/recip...ipe_cullen.htm
>> >
>> >
>> > The potato doesn't have to be mashed: in some areas, you drop them in in
>> > lumps and let bits disintegrate in the soup, so it thickens it and you
>> > get the lumps too. My granny used to just squeeze them a bit as she
>> > dropped them in, so the lumps were all different sizes and shapes!
>> >
>> > In some areas, diced or grated neeps are also added. It's like most
>> > other peasant recipes: a basic idea with slight regional variations.
>> >
>> > A hotel I worked in on the Fife coast did a very local variation I
>> > havent seen elswhere, made with fresh partons. After completion, it was
>> > pureed.
>> >

>>
>> Kate -
>> I managed to figure out "neeps," but what are partons?
>> Peg

>
>Oops! Sorry! Crabs!



And here I was thinking breast of chick(en).

Boron
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Kate Dicey
 
Posts: n/a
Default Haggis

Boron Elgar wrote:

> On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 03:34:50 +0000, Kate Dicey
> > wrote:
>
> >Peggy wrote:
> >
> >> Kate Dicey wrote:
> >>
> >> > Opinicus wrote:
> >> >
> >> >>"Peggy" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>>What's cullen skink?
> >> >>
> >> >>http://www.rampantscotland.com/recip...ipe_cullen.htm
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > The potato doesn't have to be mashed: in some areas, you drop them in in
> >> > lumps and let bits disintegrate in the soup, so it thickens it and you
> >> > get the lumps too. My granny used to just squeeze them a bit as she
> >> > dropped them in, so the lumps were all different sizes and shapes!
> >> >
> >> > In some areas, diced or grated neeps are also added. It's like most
> >> > other peasant recipes: a basic idea with slight regional variations.
> >> >
> >> > A hotel I worked in on the Fife coast did a very local variation I
> >> > havent seen elswhere, made with fresh partons. After completion, it was
> >> > pureed.
> >> >
> >>
> >> Kate -
> >> I managed to figure out "neeps," but what are partons?
> >> Peg

> >
> >Oops! Sorry! Crabs!

>
> And here I was thinking breast of chick(en).
>
> Boron


No, the crabby, shelled sort, not the pneumatic bust type pf parton, from he

http://www.gm0hzm.freeserve.co.uk/html/east_neuk.html

My granny lives on St Monans, and I worked one summer in the hotel in
Anstruther. We used to go to the fish market at Pittenweem


--
Kate XXXXXX
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!


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