General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 01:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 258
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 19
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.
See here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin

--
http://www.cookdojo.com

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 08:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 11,045
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

lorento wrote:

Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.
See here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin



Since you were already in wikipedia, did you even LOOK for mahi-mahi, which
is where the discussion of the FISH called "dolphin" arose? If you had taken
that oh-so-simple step, you'd have seen that nancree was right:

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahi-mahi

The Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), also known as dolphin, dolphin-fish, or
dorado, are surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shore tropical and
subtropical waters world-wide. They are one of only two members of the
Coryphaenidae family, the other being the Pompano dolphinfish. The name
"mahi-mahi" ("strong-strong" in Hawaiian), particularly on restaurant menus,
has been adopted in recent years to avoid confusing these fish with
dolphins, members of the porpoise family, which are mammals.


Bob


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 09:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,780
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

On 2 Jun 2006 23:07:43 -0700, lorento wrote:

nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.


*Fish* are not mammals.
http://tinyurl.com/ojklq

--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 02:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,215
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".


"lorento" wrote in message
oups.com...
nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.
See here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin

--
http://www.cookdojo.com



Okay, here comes the 'Fishlady' to the rescue. Dolphins ARE mammals, this
however is what is called a 'Dolphin Fish' otherwise known as a Mahi-Mahi
($9.99 lb in my establishment) and is known for its taste as ease of
cooking. It has been yuppified to a high art form. The picture posted
matches those in my order books, this is a dolphin fish, a cold blooded,
non-mammal, FISH. VBG
-Ginny




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,267
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".


"lorento" wrote in message
oups.com...
nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.
See here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin

--
http://www.cookdojo.com


No, dolphins are dolphins, dolphin fish are dorados. See he
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolphin_fish

kimberly


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 06:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 48
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".


nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


That is one annoyed looking fish. Why am I reminded of J. Edger
Hoover?

And what is the best way to prepare a dolphin fish?

John Kane, Kingston ON Canada

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 06:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,879
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

sf wrote:
On 2 Jun 2006 23:07:43 -0700, lorento wrote:

nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg


Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.




There are too many animals called "dolphin".

dolphin = Flipper, the mammal, often found in aquarium shows

very different from:

dolphin = dolphin fish = dorado/mahi-mahi often found on a plate

gloria p
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 06:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 8,635
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

Puester wrote:

dolphin = Flipper, the mammal, often found in aquarium shows

very different from:

dolphin = dolphin fish = dorado/mahi-mahi often found on a plate


Am I correct in thinking that the "dolphin fish" name
derives from the fish's gymnastic ability, which to some
gamefishermen resembles that of a (mammalian) dolphin?

Steve
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,780
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 17:35:40 GMT, Puester wrote:

sf wrote:
On 2 Jun 2006 23:07:43 -0700, lorento wrote:

nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg

Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.



There are too many animals called "dolphin".

dolphin = Flipper, the mammal, often found in aquarium shows

very different from:

dolphin = dolphin fish = dorado/mahi-mahi often found on a plate


Back when I was a kid, Flipper hadn't been on TV yet. Dolphin were
fish and porpoises were mammals. Maybe the marine biologists hadn't
decided the fine differences between them yet, who knows (who cares)?
In preFlipper days, we didn't know the fine differences between
smaller cetaceans. So when I say dolphin, I mean the fish. If I'm
talking about the mammal, I'll specify what I'm talking about by
saying bottlenosed Dolphin.
http://www.nhm.org/research/mammals/...p/dolporp.html

With that said, I've learned to call the fish Mahi-Mahi because
I'm on the West Coast now and that's what they say here.



--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,557
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

wrote:
nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg

That is one annoyed looking fish. Why am I reminded of J. Edger
Hoover?


Is the fish wearing a dress?

Bob
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 322
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

On Sat, 3 Jun 2006 09:01:32 -0400, Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:



Okay, here comes the 'Fishlady' to the rescue. Dolphins ARE mammals, this
however is what is called a 'Dolphin Fish' otherwise known as a Mahi-Mahi
($9.99 lb in my establishment) and is known for its taste as ease of
cooking. It has been yuppified to a high art form. The picture posted
matches those in my order books, this is a dolphin fish, a cold blooded,
non-mammal, FISH. VBG
-Ginny

I remember up until the mid sixties, there was no confusion between
the mammal and the fish. That is about the time there was a program on
tv, where some kids had porpoise "friends". After that it seemed there
was confusion.
--
Pan Ohco
I would like to see the bottom of my monitor, but I have cats.
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 10:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 258
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".


zxcvbob wrote:
wrote:
nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg

That is one annoyed looking fish. Why am I reminded of J. Edger
Hoover?


Is the fish wearing a dress?

Bob

-------------------
LOL
Thanks,
Nancree

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 11:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,780
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

On Sat, 3 Jun 2006 17:40:44 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

Puester wrote:

dolphin = Flipper, the mammal, often found in aquarium shows

very different from:

dolphin = dolphin fish = dorado/mahi-mahi often found on a plate


Am I correct in thinking that the "dolphin fish" name
derives from the fish's gymnastic ability, which to some
gamefishermen resembles that of a (mammalian) dolphin?

They are definately game fish and even the little ones are exciting to
catch. I remember (as a kid) our fishing boat was in a school of them
- they were biting at everything, they didn't even need to bait their
lines. Jokes about them jumping into the boat abounded that day.

--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-06-2006, 12:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default for those who asked about the dolphin "fish".

"Puester" wrote in message
...
sf wrote:
On 2 Jun 2006 23:07:43 -0700, lorento wrote:

nancree wrote:
Here's a photo of a dolphin fish (not the mammal, like Flipper g )

http://www.matty-j.com/images/Dolphi...Costa_Rica.jpg
Are you sure? I think dolphin fish refer to a mammal fish.




There are too many animals called "dolphin".

dolphin = Flipper, the mammal, often found in aquarium shows

very different from:

dolphin = dolphin fish = dorado/mahi-mahi often found on a plate

gloria p



Let's add to the confusion.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porpoise
http://www.theporpoisepage.com/porpvdolph.php




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SOME GUY SELLS "all kinds of fish" Colonel Edmund J. Burke[_13_] General Cooking 1 29-03-2016 07:05 PM
Has a "friend" ever asked you for your recipe and then publishedunder their own name? [email protected] General Cooking 124 22-01-2008 03:51 PM
recipe request "fish" sticks Car Isaacs Vegan 1 17-11-2007 10:31 PM
Who asked me? "The meek are getting ready." Wayne Boatwright[_2_] General Cooking 8 24-10-2007 12:43 PM
"cathyxyz" asked about the RFC'rs MAP nancree General Cooking 9 27-04-2006 04:08 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:14 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017