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Old 03-04-2004, 12:54 AM
Dave Smith
 
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Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Lucretia Borgia wrote:

I would like to try making that Coconut Layer Cake that was mentioned
here a few days ago.

I can find cans of Coconut Milk, in the drinks section of the
supermarket as suggested, is this the same as Coconut Cream?

It sounds thickish when I shake the can.


It usually is pretty thick. It often separates in the can so that you get
some thin liquid and a lot of sediment around the edge, but all you have
to do it stir it around and get it evenly mixed.


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Old 03-04-2004, 05:39 AM
Julia Altshuler
 
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Default coconut cream/coconut milk

hahabogus wrote:
Coconut milk is made out of water and freshly shredded coconut flesh. The
water is filtered thru the shredded coconut. This is easily made at home,
but involves the hard work of getting the meat out of the coconut and
shredding it , plus a cloth bag to use as a filter and a bowl to collect
the drippings. It takes overnight. I have read recipes for the making of it
but never tried it myself (too lazy I guess).



Tips to make it easier:


The coconut will have 3 spots or eyes forming a little face at one end.
They're the place that's soft and easy to break into. You can use a
screwdriver. Empty the coconut water through there. (Strain this, cool
and drink it.)


Crack the coconut by taking it outside and throwing it against the
sidewalk. When it breaks into pieces, pick them up. Put them in the
oven at 350 degrees for a few minutes. As the coconut meat contracts
from the heat, the hard outer shell stays the same size. This makes
it easier to separate the white fleshy part from the inedible part.
Use the same screwdriver.


Put the white coconut meat in the cuisinart with a steel blade. Add
boiling water. Process. Skip the cheesecloth and use a regular metal
strainer. Push through with a spoon. It won't take overnight, a few
minutes max. I stop after the first pressing, but you could take what's
leftover (someone provide the word, please), add more hot water and
process again in the cuisinart. Press again.


The liquid you've extracted is the milk, and like milk, the cream will
rise to the top for use in recipes.


And now a confession: I prefer the canned stuff! To me, it tastes more
coconutty. This is one of those rare instances where I prefer the
artificial product to the real thing.


--Lia

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Old 03-04-2004, 05:49 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Julia Altshuler wrote in
news:[email protected]_s52:

hahabogus wrote:
Coconut milk is made out of water and freshly shredded coconut flesh.
The water is filtered thru the shredded coconut. This is easily made
at home, but involves the hard work of getting the meat out of the
coconut and shredding it , plus a cloth bag to use as a filter and a
bowl to collect the drippings. It takes overnight. I have read
recipes for the making of it but never tried it myself (too lazy I
guess).



Tips to make it easier:


The coconut will have 3 spots or eyes forming a little face at one
end.
They're the place that's soft and easy to break into. You can use a
screwdriver. Empty the coconut water through there. (Strain this,
cool and drink it.)


Crack the coconut by taking it outside and throwing it against the
sidewalk. When it breaks into pieces, pick them up. Put them in the
oven at 350 degrees for a few minutes. As the coconut meat contracts
from the heat, the hard outer shell stays the same size. This makes
it easier to separate the white fleshy part from the inedible part.
Use the same screwdriver.


Put the white coconut meat in the cuisinart with a steel blade. Add
boiling water. Process. Skip the cheesecloth and use a regular metal
strainer. Push through with a spoon. It won't take overnight, a few
minutes max. I stop after the first pressing, but you could take
what's leftover (someone provide the word, please), add more hot water
and process again in the cuisinart. Press again.


The liquid you've extracted is the milk, and like milk, the cream will
rise to the top for use in recipes.


And now a confession: I prefer the canned stuff! To me, it tastes
more coconutty. This is one of those rare instances where I prefer
the artificial product to the real thing.


--Lia



A good brand would not be "artificial" and would not contain anything but
the coconut cream or coconut milk, with possibly a few preservatives. I
agree, it's definitely easier.
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Old 03-04-2004, 06:27 AM
d w a c o n
 
Posts: n/a
Default coconut cream/coconut milk


"Lucretia Borgia" wrote in message
...
I would like to try making that Coconut Layer Cake that was mentioned
here a few days ago.

I can find cans of Coconut Milk, in the drinks section of the
supermarket as suggested, is this the same as Coconut Cream?



I use coconut milk for Thai dishes...


--
Glass for your ass...
http://tinyurl.com/27sgb


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Old 03-04-2004, 07:11 AM
hahabogus
 
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Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Wayne Boatwright wrote in
:

Julia Altshuler wrote in
news:[email protected]_s52:

hahabogus wrote:
Coconut milk is made out of water and freshly shredded coconut
flesh. The water is filtered thru the shredded coconut. This is
easily made at home, but involves the hard work of getting the meat
out of the coconut and shredding it , plus a cloth bag to use as a
filter and a bowl to collect the drippings. It takes overnight. I
have read recipes for the making of it but never tried it myself
(too lazy I guess).



Tips to make it easier:


The coconut will have 3 spots or eyes forming a little face at one
end.
They're the place that's soft and easy to break into. You can use
a
screwdriver. Empty the coconut water through there. (Strain this,
cool and drink it.)


Crack the coconut by taking it outside and throwing it against the
sidewalk. When it breaks into pieces, pick them up. Put them in the
oven at 350 degrees for a few minutes. As the coconut meat contracts
from the heat, the hard outer shell stays the same size. This
makes it easier to separate the white fleshy part from the inedible
part.
Use the same screwdriver.


Put the white coconut meat in the cuisinart with a steel blade. Add
boiling water. Process. Skip the cheesecloth and use a regular
metal strainer. Push through with a spoon. It won't take overnight,
a few minutes max. I stop after the first pressing, but you could
take what's leftover (someone provide the word, please), add more hot
water and process again in the cuisinart. Press again.


Perhaps a food mill would work better than pressing thru a metal strainer.
But this method doesn't remove the dark skin on the coconut flesh. The old
way would be cracking the coconut in half with the back side of a machette
and using a toothed device to shred the flesh while still inside the
hardened outer shell.

Mash would be the word.



The liquid you've extracted is the milk, and like milk, the cream
will rise to the top for use in recipes.


And now a confession: I prefer the canned stuff! To me, it tastes
more coconutty. This is one of those rare instances where I prefer
the artificial product to the real thing.


--Lia



A good brand would not be "artificial" and would not contain anything
but the coconut cream or coconut milk, with possibly a few
preservatives. I agree, it's definitely easier.




--
Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food
and water.
--------
FIELDS, W. C.


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Old 03-04-2004, 01:58 PM
Julia Altshuler
 
Posts: n/a
Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

A good brand would not be "artificial" and would not contain anything but
the coconut cream or coconut milk, with possibly a few preservatives. I
agree, it's definitely easier.



Right. I'm not sure why, but I seem to prefer the taste of artificial
coconut. Like so many, I didn't care for coconut as a child. My first
introduction to it that I enjoyed was in TGIF's pina coladas. That's
the flavor I'm after and that I don't get from the all natural product.


--Lia

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Old 03-04-2004, 02:04 PM
Julia Altshuler
 
Posts: n/a
Default coconut cream/coconut milk

hahabogus wrote:


Perhaps a food mill would work better than pressing thru a metal strainer.
But this method doesn't remove the dark skin on the coconut flesh. The old
way would be cracking the coconut in half with the back side of a machette
and using a toothed device to shred the flesh while still inside the
hardened outer shell.

Mash would be the word.



Two brown parts to the coconut: One is hard, woody and inedible. That
separates from the white coconut meat, maybe not easily, but it does
separate. The heat briefly in the oven trick helps there. Then there's
the paper thin layer of brown that's truely stuck to the white meat. I
know of no way of getting it off without wasting half the white meat.
Luckily, it is edible. I process it in the food processor. It produces
attractive brown flecks that get strained out when you make the coconut
cream. If I'm eating the coconut straight, I eat it too.


--Lia

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Old 03-04-2004, 02:29 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Julia Altshuler wrote in
news:[email protected]_s04:

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

A good brand would not be "artificial" and would not contain anything
but the coconut cream or coconut milk, with possibly a few
preservatives. I agree, it's definitely easier.



Right. I'm not sure why, but I seem to prefer the taste of artificial
coconut. Like so many, I didn't care for coconut as a child. My
first introduction to it that I enjoyed was in TGIF's pina coladas.
That's the flavor I'm after and that I don't get from the all natural
product.


--Lia


Oh, I see. They each do have their distinctive taste. I happen to like
both depending on what I'm going to use it for.

Wayne

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Old 03-04-2004, 02:31 PM
Wayne Boatwright
 
Posts: n/a
Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Julia Altshuler wrote in
news:[email protected]_s04:

hahabogus wrote:


Perhaps a food mill would work better than pressing thru a metal
strainer. But this method doesn't remove the dark skin on the coconut
flesh. The old way would be cracking the coconut in half with the
back side of a machette and using a toothed device to shred the flesh
while still inside the hardened outer shell.

Mash would be the word.



Two brown parts to the coconut: One is hard, woody and inedible.
That separates from the white coconut meat, maybe not easily, but it
does separate. The heat briefly in the oven trick helps there. Then
there's the paper thin layer of brown that's truely stuck to the white
meat. I know of no way of getting it off without wasting half the
white meat. Luckily, it is edible. I process it in the food
processor. It produces attractive brown flecks that get strained out
when you make the coconut cream. If I'm eating the coconut straight,
I eat it too.


--Lia


I remove the thin brown layer from the cocnut meat with a vegetable
peeler. It doesn't seem to waste too much, but I guess it depends on the
peeler.

Wayne

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Old 03-04-2004, 03:17 PM
Julia Altshuler
 
Posts: n/a
Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Lucretia Borgia wrote:

Are you sure there really is fake coconut ? Even the desiccated
coconut appears to be real.



Nope. I'm not sure. There's some sort of coconut flavor that I don't
get from the real thing but that I like. Maybe it's a flavor that's
brought out when sugar is added? I don't know.

--Lia



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Old 03-04-2004, 03:23 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default coconut cream/coconut milk

Julia Altshuler writes:

Duh'Wayne Notbright wrote:

A good brand would not be "artificial" and would not contain anything but
the coconut cream or coconut milk, with possibly a few preservatives. I
agree, it's definitely easier.



Right. I'm not sure why, but I seem to prefer the taste of artificial
coconut. Like so many, I didn't care for coconut as a child. My first
introduction to it that I enjoyed was in TGIF's pina coladas. That's
the flavor I'm after and that I don't get from the all natural product.


Coconut is one of the most plentiful food products on the planet. Coconut
cream/milk is very inexpensive, I seriously doubt TGIF's (or any other gin
mill) uses artificial coconut flavoring for mixed drinks.
I'm looking at a can of Coco Goya right now, I pay 99/15oz can, I'm positive
gin mills pay wholesale... a pina colada uses about a teaspoonful, about 3
worth. Coco Goya contains coconut juice (pressed coconut meat and water),
sugar, and a few preservatives.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."



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