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  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 12:19 AM
Bob (this one)
 
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Bob wrote:
Sheldon volleyed:


Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL

And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem


So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.



Please, Sheldon, regale us with tales of your Chinese heritage and your
lengthy apprenticeship under an unremittingly traditional chef in a
professional kitchen in China. Or please provide some authoritative
source -- not some bullshit web site; we all know that web sites can be
found to support all kinds of idiocy -- which backs up your statements.

Don't have any?

Then STFU.

Bob
P.S.: Your spell-checker isn't working, and your native spelling
deficiencies are showing.


Apparently the content and IQ checkers are equally dead.

Pastorio

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 12:42 AM
jmcquown
 
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"Ariane Jenkins" wrote in message
...
On 29 Mar 2005 19:13:00 -0800, Sheldon wrote:

aem wrote:
Sheldon wrote:
[snip preceding]

You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
yolk is fried

Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


But I am. And this is the first I've heard of using only the yolk in
fried rice. Most people I know use the whole egg in fried rice, hot and

sour
soup, etc. including myself. And it can be stir-fried separately from the
rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making it. An

aunt
of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin pancake and then
cooling it before julienning it for a garnish. Other aunts of mine simply
scramble it with the rice so that it forms small chunks mixed in with
everything else. Less elegant, perhaps, but it's faster and it tastes

just as
good.

Then again, you're also the same person who claimed few procedures

in
Asian cuisine takes longer than 3 minutes and that wasn't true, either.

Ariane
--
Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
relationships is you.
http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html

Thanks, Ariane. I don't know that my recipe is "authentic", just that
mother was given it in Thailand and I've been enjoying it for over 30 years
and making it myself for over 20. I definitely use whole egg in fried rice
and in these dumplings.

Jill


  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 12:48 AM
aem
 
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Sheldon wrote:
aem wrote:
Sheldon wrote:

Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them
and some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them
would agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem


So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT


I didn't make any citations, just corrected your false statement about
my ancestry. Why you think it's relevant is beyond me.

Your replying after
the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour
wisdom prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.


Actually, I replied the same day to the original post with a suggestion
which, as it happens, she followed with a good result.

Eggs are probably the most revered ingredient in Chinese cusine, eggs
play a very important part in all aspects of Chinese culture. The
Chinese are extremely particular in all the various machinations
pertaining to egg usage in their cusine and they do in fact pay very
careful attention to the proportion of white and yolk used.


The Rule of Holes might help you out: When you're in over your head,
stop digging. -aem

  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 01:26 AM
Rusty
 
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On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
wrote:




I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. The filling
turned out fine. However, by the time I got around to doing that, I wound
up just covering it tightly in a bowl. I'll fill and steam the dumplings
today. I also thought I'd take about 1/2 of the mixture and add some
chopped water chestnuts for something a little different with a bit of
crunch.

Jill


Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.

I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.

Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?


Rusty
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 01:35 AM
Sheldon
 
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Rusty wrote:

Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.

I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.

Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?


Dump your corn starch into a different container... a jelly jar works
for me.

Btw, those shaker holes are for powdering a babie's b-hind.

Sheldon



  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 01:45 AM
Arri London
 
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Rusty wrote:

On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
wrote:




I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. The filling
turned out fine. However, by the time I got around to doing that, I wound
up just covering it tightly in a bowl. I'll fill and steam the dumplings
today. I also thought I'd take about 1/2 of the mixture and add some
chopped water chestnuts for something a little different with a bit of
crunch.

Jill


Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?



LOL not especially. We remove it from the box and put it into a clean
wide-mouth screwtop jar. Easy to measure out and easy to clean for the
next box.





The Kingsford's comes in a box with a plastic inner liner. After
scooping out several tablespoons of cornstarch, the liner has bumped
the measuring spoon and flipped cornstarch everywhere.

I've tried the Betty Crocker cornstarch that comes in a cylinder. The
plastic top rotates open and closed. Of course the slot that opens is
too narrow to get the measuring spoon into. When trying to shake the
cornstarch into the measuring spoon it either cakes up and won't come
out of the container or big globs come out and go everywhere.

Does anyone make a workable container that allows you to use
cornstarch without spreading it everywhere?

Rusty

  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 02:08 AM
jmcquown
 
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"Rusty" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 14:14:21 -0600, "jmcquown"
wrote:




I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. Jill


Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?

Not particularly. I use that stuff in the yellow box wth a woman dressed
like she's a corn cob on the box.
(snippage)
Rusty


Here's my finished first batch of Thai dumplings. Absolutely delicious.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/...09920234pghZGS

Tomorrow I'll chop the remaining water chestnuts and add them to the
remaining mixture before steaming.

Jill


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 02:21 AM
Rusty
 
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On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 17:45:28 -0700, Arri London
wrote:



Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?



LOL not especially. We remove it from the box and put it into a clean
wide-mouth screwtop jar. Easy to measure out and easy to clean for the
next box.




That's my gripe.

So why don't the cornstarch vendors package it in wide- mouth screwtop
jars to beging with? Most food products (I didn't say "all") are used
from the container they are sold in. If you have to move it to a
different container to use it, then I don't believe it's packaged
correctly.


Rusty
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 02:31 AM
Bob
 
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Jill wrote:

Here's my finished first batch of Thai dumplings. Absolutely delicious.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/...09920234pghZGS


(Jill, I profusely apologize for what I'm about to write.)

One of the offices at work has a TV going nonstop. In theory, it's so that
the military folks there can keep an eye on the news of the world, and react
to notify senior officials if anything potentially threatening happens. In
practice, the guys on duty watch whatever they want to watch, and when I
came into their office last week, they were watching a rerun of a Fear
Factor Christmas episode. The contestants were told to eat raw reindeer
testicles, and those testicles bore a VERY strong resemblance to that photo
of your Thai dumplings!

Bob


  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 05:41 AM
Dave Smith
 
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Rusty wrote:


Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?


Argh!!! Cornstarch is the worst.



  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 06:39 AM
Ariane Jenkins
 
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On 30 Mar 2005 13:55:44 -0800, Sheldon wrote:

So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.

Eggs are probably the most revered ingredient in Chinese cusine, eggs
play a very important part in all aspects of Chinese culture. The
Chinese are extremely particular in all the various machinations
pertaining to egg usage in their cusine and they do in fact pay very
careful attention to the proportion of white and yolk used.


Citation? You asserted that Chinese people only use yolk in fried
rice. Perhaps I missed your "citation", but so far two people of Chinese
ancestry and lots of Chinese relatives have piped up to say that none of
their family does it that way and it's certainly not an exclusive practice.
Your case doesn't look good, and you're not really helping yourself any with
posts like the above.

I also don't know where you get that idea about eggs being "the most
revered ingedient in Chinese cuisine". I'm guessing you got it from the same
place as "only yolk is used in fried rice" and "few procedures in Asian
cuisine take longer than 3 minutes". With a track record like that, people
would do well to take your helpful advice about Chinese cooking with a huge
grain of MSG.

Ariane
--
Stupidity: Quitters never win, winners never quit, but those who never win
and never quit are idiots.
http://www.despair.com/stup24x30pri.html



  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 06:42 AM
Ariane Jenkins
 
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On 30 Mar 2005 11:26:41 -0800, aem wrote:

Tastes better, I think. I push the rice away from the bottom of the
wok and break the egg(s) in there, season with s&p and a few drops of
sesame oil, scramble it in place until set but still soft, then stir it
into the rice. Doing it the 'garnish omelet' way almost always gets
you overly cooked, dry results. -aem


Yeah, the egg ends up being drier. Some people prefer the
texture better that way, I could go either way. But if it's just us,
I don't go through the extra trouble. We rarely make fried rice at home in
any case, I'm not that crazy about it.

Ariane
--
Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
relationships is you.
http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html



  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 06:52 AM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Dave Smith , if that's their real name, wrote:

Rusty wrote:

Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?


Argh!!! Cornstarch is the worst.


It's a pain in the butt, trying to work around that inner bag. But! It
makes cool sounds when you squeeze the box. Back in the days of radio,
when they needed the sound of someone walking through snow, they squeezed
the box once for each footstep. Try it .. .it's fun!

Carol
--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 06:53 AM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Dave Smith , if that's their real name, wrote:

Rusty wrote:

Don't you hate how cornstarch is packaged?


Argh!!! Cornstarch is the worst.


Oh, I just thought of this. You can get Tone's cornstarch, in a large
plastic container, at Sam's (and probably Coscto). I have a container
somewhere. Still haven't finished unpacking.

Carol
--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-03-2005, 07:09 AM
Damsel in dis Dress
 
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Ariane Jenkins , if that's their real name, wrote:

With a track record like that, people would do well to take your
helpful advice about Chinese cooking with a huge grain of MSG.


ROFLMAO!

Carol
--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon


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