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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 02:26 AM
Sheldon
 
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jmcquown wrote:
"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

jmcquown wrote:
I have no cornstarch. I have no arrowroot. I need something to

help
bind
together the filling for steamed (Asian) dumplings. I think

flour
would be
too glutinous. Aside from going to the store, any suggestions?

Recipe follows:

3 oz. crab meat
6 oz. ground pork
6 large shrimp, minced*
1 Tbs. water
1-1/2 tsp. cornstarch
1/4 tsp. garlic powder
1 egg
1-1/2 tsp. light soy sauce
1 Tbs. oil
1/2 tsp. pepper

*or 1 can baby shrimp, well drained
Combine all ingredients except wonton wrappers. Place 1 Tbs.

filling
in the
center of each wrapper and fold and pinch to seal with moistened

fingers.
Cover and steam over boiling water 20-25 minutes.

Jill


I've actually watched such items as dumpling/wonton filling being

made
at Chinese restaurants (I'm always snooping at food prep), they

don't
use corn starch or any other starch as a binder... they use egg

white
(no yolk)... starch is a great thickener (and filler) but a really
lousy binder, especially when ingredients begin to ooze liquid...

in
the above recipe the cornstarch is there to absorb the liquid

steaming
from the meat during cooking, otherwise by the time it's served
there'll be a puddle in the dish and the filling texture will

become
like it's pre-eaten... the egg is the binder... if you have no

starch
you may want to add a small bit of cooked white rice to the

mixture.
But I'd question the Asian authenticity of that recipe when it

calls
for whole egg.

I got the recipe when we lived in Bangkok. Have you never heard of

whole
egg stirred into fried rice?


You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is not
blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the yolk is
fried, the whites are saved for other things, like stuffing mixtures,
lobster sauce, hot n' sour soup, for coating seafood, etc. There's no
egg yolk blended into stuffing mixtures. The yolks are used separately
too, with egg drop soup, egg foo yong, etc. most of the whites are
removed for other uses. Separating eggs is common in all cusines. You
heard of hoodwinked, well you've been Bang Cocked! hehe

Sheldon


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 02:46 AM
Bob (this one)
 
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jmcquown wrote:

I have no cornstarch. I have no arrowroot. I need something to help bind
together the filling for steamed (Asian) dumplings. I think flour would be
too glutinous. Aside from going to the store, any suggestions?


instant mashed potatoes
rice whirled in a blender to a fine powder
cake flour (less protein than the others)
tapioca starch
potato starch
pasta run through the blender
ramen noodles through the blender
rice sticks - blender
somen, mung bean threads, shirataki noodles - blender
xanthan gum, guar gum
gelatin, pectin

All different with different characteristics.

Happy dumplings

Pastorio


Recipe follows:

3 oz. crab meat
6 oz. ground pork
6 large shrimp, minced*
1 Tbs. water
1-1/2 tsp. cornstarch
1/4 tsp. garlic powder
1 egg
1-1/2 tsp. light soy sauce
1 Tbs. oil
1/2 tsp. pepper

*or 1 can baby shrimp, well drained
Combine all ingredients except wonton wrappers. Place 1 Tbs. filling in the
center of each wrapper and fold and pinch to seal with moistened fingers.
Cover and steam over boiling water 20-25 minutes.

Jill

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 02:48 AM
aem
 
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jmcquown wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
I have no cornstarch. I have no arrowroot. I need something to
help bind together the filling for steamed (Asian) dumplings. I
think flour would be too glutinous. Aside from going to the
store, any suggestions?

[snip recipe]

I got the recipe when we lived in Bangkok. Have you never heard of
whole egg stirred into fried rice? I think I'll just add a tiny bit
of flour as Barb suggested.


Yes, use half as much flour as the cornstarch called for. Or, just
skip it. Worst that could happen is that your dumplings would be too
moist, it isn't all going to fall apart on you. -aem

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 03:03 AM
aem
 
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Sheldon wrote:
[snip preceding]

You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
yolk is fried, the whites are saved for other things, like stuffing

mixtures,
lobster sauce, hot n' sour soup, for coating seafood, etc. There's

no
egg yolk blended into stuffing mixtures. The yolks are used

separately
too, with egg drop soup, egg foo yong, etc. most of the whites are
removed for other uses. Separating eggs is common in all cusines.

You
heard of hoodwinked, well you've been Bang Cocked! hehe

Well, some cooks sometimes do it that way, but it's certainly not the
only way to do things. If you know you're going to use egg whites
later for something, then you might use only the yolks in fried rice,
but there is no reason whatsoever not to use the whole egg if you're
not saving the white. Same for egg drop soup--I have sometimes
reserved the egg white for a marinade for that meal's stirfry, but
other times I use the whole egg. For egg fooyung and for lobster
sauce, I think using only yolks would be rare and inferior. -aem

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 04:13 AM
Sheldon
 
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aem wrote:
Sheldon wrote:
[snip preceding]

You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
yolk is fried, the whites are saved for other things, like stuffing

mixtures,
lobster sauce, hot n' sour soup, for coating seafood, etc. There's

no
egg yolk blended into stuffing mixtures. The yolks are used

separately
too, with egg drop soup, egg foo yong, etc. most of the whites are
removed for other uses. Separating eggs is common in all cusines.

You
heard of hoodwinked, well you've been Bang Cocked! hehe

Well, some cooks sometimes do it that way, but it's certainly not the
only way to do things. If you know you're going to use egg whites
later for something, then you might use only the yolks in fried rice,
but there is no reason whatsoever not to use the whole egg if you're
not saving the white. Same for egg drop soup--I have sometimes
reserved the egg white for a marinade for that meal's stirfry, but
other times I use the whole egg. For egg fooyung and for lobster
sauce, I think using only yolks would be rare and inferior. -aem


Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL



  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 06:13 AM
Ariane Jenkins
 
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Default

On 29 Mar 2005 19:13:00 -0800, Sheldon wrote:

aem wrote:
Sheldon wrote:
[snip preceding]

You're not making fried rice. In fried rice the whole egg is first
fried like an omelet and then used in bits as a garnish, raw egg is
not blended into anything... in fact in Chinese fried rice only the
yolk is fried, the whites are saved for other things, like stuffing

mixtures,
lobster sauce, hot n' sour soup, for coating seafood, etc. There's

no
egg yolk blended into stuffing mixtures. The yolks are used

separately
too, with egg drop soup, egg foo yong, etc. most of the whites are
removed for other uses. Separating eggs is common in all cusines.

You
heard of hoodwinked, well you've been Bang Cocked! hehe

Well, some cooks sometimes do it that way, but it's certainly not the
only way to do things. If you know you're going to use egg whites
later for something, then you might use only the yolks in fried rice,
but there is no reason whatsoever not to use the whole egg if you're
not saving the white. Same for egg drop soup--I have sometimes
reserved the egg white for a marinade for that meal's stirfry, but
other times I use the whole egg. For egg fooyung and for lobster
sauce, I think using only yolks would be rare and inferior. -aem


Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


But I am. And this is the first I've heard of using only the yolk in
fried rice. Most people I know use the whole egg in fried rice, hot and sour
soup, etc. including myself. And it can be stir-fried separately from the
rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making it. An aunt
of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin pancake and then
cooling it before julienning it for a garnish. Other aunts of mine simply
scramble it with the rice so that it forms small chunks mixed in with
everything else. Less elegant, perhaps, but it's faster and it tastes just as
good.

Then again, you're also the same person who claimed few procedures in
Asian cuisine takes longer than 3 minutes and that wasn't true, either.

Ariane
--
Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
relationships is you.
http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 06:45 AM
Bob
 
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Ariane replied to Sheldon:

Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


But I am. And this is the first I've heard of using only the yolk in
fried rice. Most people I know use the whole egg in fried rice, hot and
sour soup, etc. including myself. And it can be stir-fried separately
from the rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making
it. An aunt of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin
pancake and then cooling it before julienning it for a garnish. Other
aunts of mine simply scramble it with the rice so that it forms small
chunks mixed in with everything else. Less elegant, perhaps, but it's
faster and it tastes just as good.

Then again, you're also the same person who claimed few procedures in
Asian cuisine takes longer than 3 minutes and that wasn't true, either.



If I may, allow me to anticipate Sheldon's response: "You're not Chinese, no
Chinese would ever do it the way your fercocktah illiterate six-fingered
inbred mongoloid Filipina house monkeys do it. Your taste is in your ass and
you no makee flied lice. Ahahahahahahahahah"

....but that's just the way Sheldon is: ignorant, but predictable.

Bob


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 07:27 AM
Ariane Jenkins
 
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On 29 Mar 2005 23:45:02 -0600, Bob wrote:

If I may, allow me to anticipate Sheldon's response: "You're not Chinese, no
Chinese would ever do it the way your fercocktah illiterate six-fingered
inbred mongoloid Filipina house monkeys do it. Your taste is in your ass and
you no makee flied lice. Ahahahahahahahahah"

...but that's just the way Sheldon is: ignorant, but predictable.


LOL... Careful, you're scaring me now. g

There's nothing wrong with being unfamiliar with Chinese or Asian
cuisine. It'd just be a good idea to refrain from talking as if he was,
particularly on a newsgroup where there's plenty of posters who are. Of
course, if someone is into public humiliation in a kinky way, then all
bets are off.

Ariane
--
Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
relationships is you.
http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 10:38 AM
Miche
 
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In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

I have no cornstarch. I have no arrowroot. I need something to help bind
together the filling for steamed (Asian) dumplings. I think flour would be
too glutinous. Aside from going to the store, any suggestions?


Potato flour? Works well for me.

Miche

--
WWMVD?
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 07:35 PM
aem
 
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Sheldon wrote:

Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem



  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 08:26 PM
aem
 
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Ariane Jenkins wrote:
[snip]
And it can be stir-fried separately from the
rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making it.
An aunt of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin
pancake and then cooling it before julienning it for a garnish.
Other aunts of mine simply scramble it with the rice so that it forms
small chunks mixed in with everything else. Less elegant, perhaps,
but it's faster and it tastes just as good. [snip]


Tastes better, I think. I push the rice away from the bottom of the
wok and break the egg(s) in there, season with s&p and a few drops of
sesame oil, scramble it in place until set but still soft, then stir it
into the rice. Doing it the 'garnish omelet' way almost always gets
you overly cooked, dry results. -aem

  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 09:11 PM
jmcquown
 
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Default


"aem" wrote in message
oups.com...
Ariane Jenkins wrote:
[snip]
And it can be stir-fried separately from the
rice OR stir-fried with it, it varies according to who's making it.
An aunt of mine does it the omelet way--cooking it into a thin
pancake and then cooling it before julienning it for a garnish.
Other aunts of mine simply scramble it with the rice so that it forms
small chunks mixed in with everything else. Less elegant, perhaps,
but it's faster and it tastes just as good. [snip]


Tastes better, I think. I push the rice away from the bottom of the
wok and break the egg(s) in there, season with s&p and a few drops of
sesame oil, scramble it in place until set but still soft, then stir it
into the rice.

-aem

I like them added to fried rice in this manner as well.

Jill


  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 09:14 PM
jmcquown
 
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Default


"aem" wrote in message
oups.com...
jmcquown wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
I have no cornstarch. I have no arrowroot. I need something to
help bind together the filling for steamed (Asian) dumplings. I
think flour would be too glutinous. Aside from going to the
store, any suggestions?

[snip recipe]

I got the recipe when we lived in Bangkok. Have you never heard of
whole egg stirred into fried rice? I think I'll just add a tiny bit
of flour as Barb suggested.


Yes, use half as much flour as the cornstarch called for. Or, just
skip it. Worst that could happen is that your dumplings would be too
moist, it isn't all going to fall apart on you. -aem

I used just a couple of pinches of flour and mixed it all up. The filling
turned out fine. However, by the time I got around to doing that, I wound
up just covering it tightly in a bowl. I'll fill and steam the dumplings
today. I also thought I'd take about 1/2 of the mixture and add some
chopped water chestnuts for something a little different with a bit of
crunch.

Jill


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 10:55 PM
Sheldon
 
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aem wrote:
Sheldon wrote:

Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem


So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.

Eggs are probably the most revered ingredient in Chinese cusine, eggs
play a very important part in all aspects of Chinese culture. The
Chinese are extremely particular in all the various machinations
pertaining to egg usage in their cusine and they do in fact pay very
careful attention to the proportion of white and yolk used.

  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-03-2005, 11:13 PM
Bob
 
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Sheldon volleyed:

Yeah, well... you're not Chinese. LOL


And you are? I'm not, but my mother and aunts and uncles were, and
they all cooked Chinese meals at home. I learned some from them and
some from a wide variety of Chinese cookbooks. None of them would
agree with what you posted about eggs. -aem


So you claim to have learned from relatives, and cookbooks with no
name, so your citations are better than mine? NOT Your replying after
the fact with pure garbage can't trump me... if you really knew the
answer to the OP's problem you had more than enough time and
opportunity to reply with your what you think is your superiour wisdom
prior to my response... you're a day late and a nickle short.


Please, Sheldon, regale us with tales of your Chinese heritage and your
lengthy apprenticeship under an unremittingly traditional chef in a
professional kitchen in China. Or please provide some authoritative
source -- not some bullshit web site; we all know that web sites can be
found to support all kinds of idiocy -- which backs up your statements.

Don't have any?

Then STFU.

Bob
P.S.: Your spell-checker isn't working, and your native spelling
deficiencies are showing.




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