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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
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Default Making pizza on a grill

Hello everyone: Any of you have experience making pizza on a grill? I
think I will try to put it in a skillet.
Any tips? I intend to make it with pancetta and egg...
Stephanie

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My wife does it all the time. She usually uses a cookie sheet and lays
the pizza on there. Run the grill at about 400F and keep the lid down
so as to not release all of the top heat. About 10 minutes will do
most pizzas, maybe a little more if it's a thick crust.

JW

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I saw someone make it on television and they cracked the egg right on
the top.
I've made a great pasta with olive oil, cheese, pancetta and an egg
cracked on the top, so I thought, why not?



  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
BOB
 
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> wrote in message
oups.com
> Hello everyone: Any of you have experience making pizza on a grill?


Yes, many times. But probably not the type of grill that you're
thinking of.

> I think I will try to put it in a skillet.


I've heard of that, but I've never tried it.

> Any tips? I intend to make it with pancetta and egg...
> Stephanie


Here's a link to a "green" pizza I made, complete with pictures and a
step-by-step commentary and a Q. & A. session.
'-)

http://www.kamado.com/cgi-bin/discus...0956#POST20956

BOB
it's the only pizza pictures I have



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
anthonyd
 
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>> Um, you're baking bread... then using it to make a hot open faced
>> sandwich... that is NOT pizza!


> Why not?


Because the bread is cooked without toppings, so essentially, you are
making bread and then topping the bread. Whereas pizza dough is topped
and then baked and all is cooked together.

I think he is correct. It also does not taste quite the same - even
forgetting about the flavor imparted by the grill. But I do like it!

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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"anthonyd" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> >> Um, you're baking bread... then using it to make a hot open faced
> >> sandwich... that is NOT pizza!

>
> > Why not?

>
> Because the bread is cooked without toppings, so essentially, you are
> making bread and then topping the bread. Whereas pizza dough is topped
> and then baked and all is cooked together.


It isn't as if you have a piece of toast and you just add toppings to it and
eat it. The dough isn't fully pre-cooked, it finishes cooking along with the
toppings. Either way, the sauce is absorbed into the dough, and the cheese
sticks to the dough. The end result is excellent, and frankly much closer in
look and taste and texture to the original pizza which is baked in a brick
oven than what people bake in their conventional ovens. I think it's silly
to suggest that it somehow isn't pizza.


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anthonyd
 
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> It isn't as if you have a piece of toast and you just add toppings to
it and
> eat it. The dough isn't fully pre-cooked, it finishes cooking along

with the
> toppings. Either way, the sauce is absorbed into the dough, and the

cheese
> sticks to the dough. The end result is excellent, and frankly much

closer in
> look and taste and texture to the original pizza which is baked in a

brick
> oven than what people bake in their conventional ovens. I think it's

silly
> to suggest that it somehow isn't pizza.


I respectfully dissagree. Since this is the method I use, I can tell
you that the dough is pretty much, if not completely cooked through
before the flip (certainly on the flipped side to which the toppings
are applied). So, you are making bread and then putting toppings on.
You can call it pizza, and 90 out of a 100 people might do so at the
presentation, but strictly speaking it's not really pizza which is
defined as below:

Main Entry: piz=B7za
Pronunciation: 'pEt-s&
Function: noun
Etymology: Italian, perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German
bizzo, pizzo bite, bit, bIzan to bite -- more at BITE
an open pie made typically of flattened bread dough spread with a
savory mixture usually including tomatoes and cheese and often other
toppings and baked -- called also pizza pie



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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anthonyd wrote:
>> It isn't as if you have a piece of toast and you just add toppings
>> to it and eat it. The dough isn't fully pre-cooked, it finishes
>> cooking along with the toppings. Either way, the sauce is absorbed
>> into the dough, and the cheese sticks to the dough. The end result
>> is excellent, and frankly much closer in look and taste and texture
>> to the original pizza which is baked in a brick oven than what
>> people bake in their conventional ovens. I think it's silly to
>> suggest that it somehow isn't pizza.

>
> I respectfully dissagree. Since this is the method I use, I can tell
> you that the dough is pretty much, if not completely cooked through
> before the flip


I do this too, and the dough is not, or at least does not need to be, fully
cooked through. You put it on long enough to stiffen up the dough, then flip
it, apply the toppings, close the lid and in a few more minutes your pizza
is done.


> (certainly on the flipped side to which the toppings
> are applied). So, you are making bread and then putting toppings on.
> You can call it pizza, and 90 out of a 100 people might do so at the
> presentation, but strictly speaking it's not really pizza which is
> defined as below:
>
> Main Entry: piz·za
> Pronunciation: 'pEt-s&
> Function: noun
> Etymology: Italian, perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old High
> German bizzo, pizzo bite, bit, bIzan to bite -- more at BITE
> an open pie made typically of flattened bread dough spread with a
> savory mixture usually including tomatoes and cheese and often other
> toppings and baked -- called also pizza pie


Yeah, I can play that game too - from dictionary.com:

"A baked pie of Italian origin consisting of a shallow breadlike crust
covered with seasoned tomato sauce, cheese, and often other toppings, such
as sausage or olives."

According to that definition, the grilled method qualifies as pizza.

So what do you tell your guests when you make it? We're having pizza, or
we're having bread with pizza toppings put on it?

It's just plain silly to pick nits like this and say it isn't pizza.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Peter wrote:
> anthonyd wrote:
> >> It isn't as if you have a piece of toast and you just add toppings
> >> to it and eat it. The dough isn't fully pre-cooked, it finishes
> >> cooking along with the toppings. Either way, the sauce is absorbed
> >> into the dough, and the cheese sticks to the dough. The end result
> >> is excellent, and frankly much closer in look and taste and

texture
> >> to the original pizza which is baked in a brick oven than what
> >> people bake in their conventional ovens. I think it's silly to
> >> suggest that it somehow isn't pizza.

> >
> > I respectfully dissagree. Since this is the method I use, I can

tell
> > you that the dough is pretty much, if not completely cooked through
> > before the flip

>
> I do this too, and the dough is not, or at least does not need to be,

fully
> cooked through. You put it on long enough to stiffen up the dough,

then flip
> it, apply the toppings, close the lid and in a few more minutes your

pizza
> is done.
>
>
> > (certainly on the flipped side to which the toppings
> > are applied). So, you are making bread and then putting toppings

on.
> > You can call it pizza, and 90 out of a 100 people might do so at

the
> > presentation, but strictly speaking it's not really pizza which is
> > defined as below:
> >
> > Main Entry: piz=B7za
> > Pronunciation: 'pEt-s&
> > Function: noun
> > Etymology: Italian, perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old High
> > German bizzo, pizzo bite, bit, bIzan to bite -- more at BITE
> > an open pie made typically of flattened bread dough spread with a
> > savory mixture usually including tomatoes and cheese and often

other
> > toppings and baked -- called also pizza pie

>
> Yeah, I can play that game too - from dictionary.com:
>
> "A baked pie of Italian origin consisting of a shallow breadlike

crust
> covered with seasoned tomato sauce, cheese, and often other toppings,

such
> as sausage or olives."
>
> According to that definition, the grilled method qualifies as pizza.
>
> So what do you tell your guests when you make it? We're having pizza,

or
> we're having bread with pizza toppings put on it?
>
> It's just plain silly to pick nits like this and say it isn't pizza.


It's not any kind of silly. When a thin piece of yeast dough is placed
on a hot grill it will immediately puff up (oven spring). After a
minute per side the yeast will have died and therefore it is in fact
fully baked... any cooking after that point is making toast...
therefore any toppings are being placed not only on bread but on
toasted bread... and that is NOT pizza, no way, no how. You may like
it, some like Boboli too, but it is NOT pizza.

Sheldon.

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Peter
 
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>> It's just plain silly to pick nits like this and say it isn't pizza.
>
> It's not any kind of silly. When a thin piece of yeast dough is
> placed on a hot grill it will immediately puff up (oven spring).
> After a minute per side the yeast will have died and therefore it is
> in fact fully baked... any cooking after that point is making toast...
> therefore any toppings are being placed not only on bread but on
> toasted bread...


Uh, huh, and how does that not meet this definition?

"A baked pie of Italian origin consisting of a shallow breadlike crust
covered with seasoned tomato sauce, cheese, and often other toppings, such
as sausage or olives."

Using your reasoning, there are virtually NO pizzas made anywhere in the US,
because almost nobody uses a coal-fired brick oven, which if you know your
pizza history, is how the first pizzas were created. (These pizzas, by the
way, have a very crisp, toasted crust.)



  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Ranee Mueller
 
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In article .com>,
" > wrote:

> Hello everyone: Any of you have experience making pizza on a grill? I
> think I will try to put it in a skillet.
> Any tips? I intend to make it with pancetta and egg...


We did this last summer with help from the folks and Fine Cooking. I
made up the pizza dough (a different recipe than theirs), and we
followed their instructions for cooking. I made a rough tomato sauce
from pureed canned tomatoes, oregano, basil, garlic and a bit of red
pepper. We sliced garlic, pepperoni, and fresh mozzarella. We also had
roasted red peppers to top the pizzas. Oh, and olives. We put the
stuff on top and grilled them, no pan underneath. We did use indirect
heat, though. They were incredible. We keep meaning to do it again,
but haven't yet.

Regards,
Ranee

--
Remove Do Not and Spam to email

"She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

See my Blog at: http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
anthonyd
 
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> Yeah, I can play that game too - from dictionary.com:
>
> "A baked pie of Italian origin consisting of a shallow breadlike

crust
> covered with seasoned tomato sauce, cheese, and often other toppings,

such
> as sausage or olives."
>
> According to that definition, the grilled method qualifies as pizza.
>
> So what do you tell your guests when you make it? We're having pizza,

or
> we're having bread with pizza toppings put on it?
>
> It's just plain silly to pick nits like this and say it isn't pizza.


I didn't pick the nit. But I agree with Sheldon's point. The dough in
_my_ "pizza" as described is pre-cooked and according to both
definitions of pizza, it's not a baked pie. Bread with toppings put on
it is not "pie."

As for silly, well sure, if you think the words that we use are
unimportant. I had the same reaction when I first read what he wrote.
But he is right and all the comments about frivolity, nits and
arguments that people will call it pizza doesn't make you or the people
right.



  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Peter writes:
>Using your reasoning, there are virtually >NO pizzas made anywhere in

the US,
>because almost nobody uses a coal->fired brick oven.


No one is disputing which type of oven. Pizza certainly can be made on
a covered grill but only if the dough is cooked *together with* the
topping, NOT by first cooking the dough and then adding the topping to
the previously cooked dough. Actually very good pizza can be made on a
grill, I do it all the time with my Weber, but I make things easy on
myself by using a perforated pizza pan... in fact I use the same
perforated pan with my regular indoor oven, perforated pizza pans work
much better than pizza stones... and perforated pans can't hurt your
oven, pizza stones definitely can, and their use will in fact void your
oven's warranty.

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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anthonyd wrote:
>> Yeah, I can play that game too - from dictionary.com:
>>
>> "A baked pie of Italian origin consisting of a shallow breadlike
>> crust covered with seasoned tomato sauce, cheese, and often other
>> toppings, such as sausage or olives."
>>
>> According to that definition, the grilled method qualifies as pizza.
>>
>> So what do you tell your guests when you make it? We're having
>> pizza, or we're having bread with pizza toppings put on it?
>>
>> It's just plain silly to pick nits like this and say it isn't pizza.

>
> I didn't pick the nit. But I agree with Sheldon's point. The dough
> in _my_ "pizza" as described is pre-cooked and according to both
> definitions of pizza, it's not a baked pie. Bread with toppings put
> on it is not "pie."
>
> As for silly, well sure, if you think the words that we use are
> unimportant. I had the same reaction when I first read what he wrote.
> But he is right and all the comments about frivolity, nits and
> arguments that people will call it pizza doesn't make you or the
> people right.


So what's the answer to my question - what do you call it?


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jerry DeAngelis
 
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Sheldon

You are not necessarily correct relative to making pizza on a grill.
Pizza is in fact a bread - a flatbread, so your comment is correct in
that sense. We have made pizza in the way described for years, and do it
pretty much the same way. This method is very good when making thin
crusted pizze. By cooking one side for a bit, one obviates the
possibility of the pizza sliding between the grill slots. Garnishing it
is a matter of taste.

It also helps to have a grill with a cover.

If the timing is correct, the pizza come out pretty much like a pizza in
an oven with the added attraction of the smoky flavor. Plus some of the
mess is left outside.

Regards

Jerry @ The Artisan
http://www.theartisan.net


"Sheldon" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> anthonyd wrote:
>> wrote:
>> > Hello everyone: Any of you have experience making pizza on a grill?

> I
>> > think I will try to put it in a skillet.
>> > Any tips? I intend to make it with pancetta and egg...
>> > Stephanie

>>
>>
>> I don't put the pizza on anything. Make sure the grill is very hot.
>> Brush one side of crust (with no toppings on yet) with oil. Lay that
>> side down on grill for a minuter or two. Brush other side with oil.
>> Flip the pizza crust over, add toppings and grill for another minute

> or
>> two.

>
> Um, you're baking bread... then using it to make a hot open faced
> sandwich... that is NOT pizza!
>



  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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Sheldon wrote:
> Peter writes:
>> Using your reasoning, there are virtually >NO pizzas made anywhere
>> in the US, because almost nobody uses a coal->fired brick oven.

>
> No one is disputing which type of oven. Pizza certainly can be made
> on a covered grill but only if the dough is cooked *together with* the
> topping,


Wow.


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jerry DeAngelis
 
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Hello:

The Romans were eating a type of pizza in ancient times. Virgil has
left a recipe for moretum - a pizza shaped circle of unleavened dough
which ultimately became the pizza of naples. Here are more specifics:
================================================== =====================
"........Versions of pizza were known in southern Italy since ancient
times. Made with unleavened dough they were eaten by both the Romans
and the Greeks, and thanks to the poet Virgil, we have a recipe for
moretum. It was a flat circle of unleavened dough and - like today's
schiacciata - eaten as bread, sometimes with oil and herbs, sometimes
with raw onions and garlic.

Though this early unleavened schiacciata was part of Italian life from
Roman times to the medieval period and beyond, historical records refer
to it again around the year 1000 A.D.. - a time when many people were
expecting the end of the world, but when Neapolitans were thinking about
food!. In that period in Naples, instead of schiacciata, people spoke
of lagano, a word coming from the Latin laganum and the Greek laganon.
The unleavened dough was roasted and cut into strips which were tossed
into a pot of vegetables or other ingredients cooking over the fire.
Laganon was, in short a kind of primitive Tagliatelle or noodle. (On
the islands of Sardinia and Sicily, Tagliatelle are still called
laganella.) ...........

........Although people in Naples spoke of lagano around the year 1000
A.D. , the word picea began to appear also. It might have been another
name for lagano or it might have indicated a new dish, a circle of dough
covered with various ingredients before baking. Shortly afterwards the
word piza came into usage. Yet it was sometimes later - when dough was
leavened, topped with simple ingredients and baked - that we have the
beginning of actual pizza and its near relation, today's round
pitta-like bread, schiacciata. ....

......Towards the end of the 18th century in Naples, pizza emerged as a
distinctive dish......
It was in the 18th century that pizza with tomatoes appeared. The first
pizzeria in Naples was opened in 1830....."

From The Artisan: http://www.theartisan.net/faux_pas_the_seventh.htm
================================================== =========
While I was not there, I cannot imagine that the Roman army carried
ovens around with them, so one possibility at least is that they cooked
the dough over fires or on makeshift grills.

Again since pizza is basically a flatbread, it can be made many ways.
Certainly grilled pizza may not meet the criteria established by the
Association of VERA PIZZA NAPOLETANA who make the rules that each
pizzaiolo in Italy must follow in order for his or her product to be
considered authentic. Neverthless, grilled pizza is a form of pizza, and
as such is a bread product. So calling grilled pizza nothing but a
bread,or an open faced bread sandwitch can be considered redundant in
this sense.

Regards

Jerry @ The Artisan
http://www.theartisan.net


"anthonyd" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> It isn't as if you have a piece of toast and you just add toppings to

it and
> eat it. The dough isn't fully pre-cooked, it finishes cooking along

with the
> toppings. Either way, the sauce is absorbed into the dough, and the

cheese
> sticks to the dough. The end result is excellent, and frankly much

closer in
> look and taste and texture to the original pizza which is baked in a

brick
> oven than what people bake in their conventional ovens. I think it's

silly
> to suggest that it somehow isn't pizza.


I respectfully dissagree. Since this is the method I use, I can tell
you that the dough is pretty much, if not completely cooked through
before the flip (certainly on the flipped side to which the toppings
are applied). So, you are making bread and then putting toppings on.
You can call it pizza, and 90 out of a 100 people might do so at the
presentation, but strictly speaking it's not really pizza which is
defined as below:

Main Entry: piz·za
Pronunciation: 'pEt-s&
Function: noun
Etymology: Italian, perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German
bizzo, pizzo bite, bit, bIzan to bite -- more at BITE
an open pie made typically of flattened bread dough spread with a
savory mixture usually including tomatoes and cheese and often other
toppings and baked -- called also pizza pie




  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
anthonyd
 
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"Peter's Pizza"

Hee hee. No, I honestly hadn't thought of it this way before, I had
called it pizza. I don't know what I'll say next time. I might try
and make it differently.

  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Jerry DeAngelis wrote:
> Sheldon
>
> You are not necessarily correct relative to making pizza on a grill.


Why not? Pizza is easy to make on a grill.

> Pizza is in fact a bread - a flatbread, so your comment is correct in


> that sense.


I am correct in every sense. To be pizza it most be cooked together
with the topping (whatever topping, even if only a modicum of oil,
herbs, and a bit of seasoning), and NOT by adding the topping to
previously cooked dough... that is a sandwich.

  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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anthonyd wrote:
> "Peter's Pizza"


What I heard the most as a kid was 'Pizza Pizza' as in 'Pete's a pizza'.


> Hee hee. No, I honestly hadn't thought of it this way before, I had
> called it pizza. I don't know what I'll say next time. I might try
> and make it differently.


That kinda highlights my point. I've always called it pizza too. And you
know what, nobody who eats it cares that the crust was partially cooked
first. It's good!


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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Sheldon wrote:
> Jerry DeAngelis wrote:
>> Sheldon
>> Pizza is in fact a bread - a flatbread, so your comment is correct in

>
>> that sense.

>
> I am correct in every sense. To be pizza it most be cooked together
> with the topping


It is cooked with the topping.


> (whatever topping, even if only a modicum of oil,
> herbs, and a bit of seasoning), and NOT by adding the topping to
> previously cooked dough... that is a sandwich.


Oh brother. OK, so then you're also making a sandwich when you use partially
cooked store-bought pizza crust too, right?

Let's see, what could this be? Pizza crust, red sauce, cheese, pepperoni -
ooh, I know - a sandwich!


  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Peter wrote:
> Sheldon wrote:
> > Jerry DeAngelis wrote:
> >> Sheldon
> >> Pizza is in fact a bread - a flatbread, so your comment is correct

in
> >
> >> that sense.

> >
> > I am correct in every sense. To be pizza it most be cooked

together
> > with the topping

>
> It is cooked with the topping.
>
>
> > (whatever topping, even if only a modicum of oil,
> > herbs, and a bit of seasoning), and NOT by adding the topping to
> > previously cooked dough... that is a sandwich.

>
> Oh brother. OK, so then you're also making a sandwich when you use

partially
> cooked store-bought pizza crust too, right?
>
> Let's see, what could this be? Pizza crust, red sauce, cheese,

pepperoni -
> ooh, I know - a sandwich!


Pizza crust baked on it's own is just bread... once baked it can never
be pizza, NOT EVER, regardless what it's topped with *after* baking...
then it's just a sandwich. You're one of those kulinary kooks who
thinks topping an English muffin and cooking it is pizza... NOT!



  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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Sheldon wrote:
> Peter wrote:
>> Sheldon wrote:
>>> Jerry DeAngelis wrote:
>>>> Sheldon
>>>> Pizza is in fact a bread - a flatbread, so your comment is correct
>>>> in
>>>
>>>> that sense.
>>>
>>> I am correct in every sense. To be pizza it most be cooked together
>>> with the topping

>>
>> It is cooked with the topping.


No comment on this fact?



>>> (whatever topping, even if only a modicum of oil,
>>> herbs, and a bit of seasoning), and NOT by adding the topping to
>>> previously cooked dough... that is a sandwich.

>>
>> Oh brother. OK, so then you're also making a sandwich when you use
>> partially cooked store-bought pizza crust too, right?
>>
>> Let's see, what could this be? Pizza crust, red sauce, cheese,
>> pepperoni - ooh, I know - a sandwich!

>
> Pizza crust baked on it's own is just bread... once baked it can never
> be pizza, NOT EVER, regardless what it's topped with *after* baking...
> then it's just a sandwich.


So you agree then that it's not possible to make pizza with store-bought
ready-to-use pizza crust. You're being ridiculous.


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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Peter wrote:
>
> So you agree then that it's not possible to make pizza with

store-bought
> ready-to-use pizza crust. You're being ridiculous.


Yep, that's sandwich... a ridiculous sandwich... but a sandwich
nevertheless.

Sheldon

  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Gregory Morrow
 
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Sheldon wrote:

> Pizza crust baked on it's own is just bread... once baked it can never
> be pizza, NOT EVER, regardless what it's topped with *after* baking...
> then it's just a sandwich. You're one of those kulinary kooks who
> thinks topping an English muffin and cooking it is pizza... NOT!
>



Oh that is called a "pizzette"...

;-p

--
Best
Greg


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
anthonyd
 
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Peter wrote:
> anthonyd wrote:
>
> > Hee hee. No, I honestly hadn't thought of it this way before, I

had
> > called it pizza. I don't know what I'll say next time. I might

try
> > and make it differently.

>
> That kinda highlights my point. I've always called it pizza too. And

you
> know what, nobody who eats it cares that the crust was partially

cooked
> first. It's good!


Yes, it does taste good. But just because I called it pizza before
doesn't make it the correct word. Perhaps we should agree to disagree
at this point?

  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Sheldon
 
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anthonyd wrote:
> Peter wrote:
> > anthonyd wrote:
> >
> > > Hee hee. No, I honestly hadn't thought of it this way before, I

> had
> > > called it pizza. I don't know what I'll say next time. I might

> try
> > > and make it differently.

> >
> > That kinda highlights my point. I've always called it pizza too.

And
> you
> > know what, nobody who eats it cares that the crust was partially

> cooked
> > first. It's good!

>
> Yes, it does taste good. But just because I called it pizza before
> doesn't make it the correct word. Perhaps we should agree to

disagree
> at this point?


Get yourself a perforated pizza pan (aluminum ones cost under $5); next
time you decide to prepare pizza try it on your grill (or in your home
oven) and report back... there is NEVER any reason to attempt pizza by
first baking bread. Pizza screens work well too, but I prefer the
perforated pan because it is sturdier... mine is from Chicago Metallic,
part of a deep dish pizza set, heavy weight carbon steel... been using
this pan regularly, at least once a month, for more than 20 years,
still like brand new.... I use the deep dish pizza pan mostly for
sticky buns.
Chicago Metallic makes great bakeware.



  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
anthonyd
 
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> Get yourself a perforated pizza pan (aluminum ones cost under $5);
next
> time you decide to prepare pizza try it on your grill (or in your

home
> oven) and report back... there is NEVER any reason to attempt pizza

by
> first baking bread. Pizza screens work well too, but I prefer the
> perforated pan because it is sturdier... mine is from Chicago

Metallic,
> part of a deep dish pizza set, heavy weight carbon steel... been

using
> this pan regularly, at least once a month, for more than 20 years,
> still like brand new.... I use the deep dish pizza pan mostly for
> sticky buns.
> Chicago Metallic makes great bakeware.


You know, I do have one that I haven't used in years since I use stones
or tiles in my oven. Thanks!

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Peter
 
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anthonyd wrote:
> Peter wrote:
>> anthonyd wrote:
>>
>>> Hee hee. No, I honestly hadn't thought of it this way before, I had
>>> called it pizza. I don't know what I'll say next time. I might try
>>> and make it differently.

>>
>> That kinda highlights my point. I've always called it pizza too. And
>> you know what, nobody who eats it cares that the crust was partially
>> cooked first. It's good!

>
> Yes, it does taste good. But just because I called it pizza before
> doesn't make it the correct word. Perhaps we should agree to disagree
> at this point?


Yes, I'd say so.


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