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Old 04-08-2007, 11:55 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??

Does anyone know where to buy a pizza stone specifically designed for a
grill? The standard stones
tend to crack because of the high grate heat underneath, and the sudden
change in temp. on the top
when you open the hood. At least I have wiped out two that way.
I've never felt you could do a decent pizza on the grill. At least mine have
flopped. However
in another NG a poster makes pizza margherita on the grill. It strikes me
that should work
better than in the oven. You should be able to get your stone hotter, and
the temp. on the top of the pizza
isn't as much of an issue when you are making sausage pizza.. The thin crust
should cook in just a couple of minutes, as it should.
TIA,

Kent



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Old 05-08-2007, 12:20 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??

"Kent" wrote in message
. ..
Does anyone know where to buy a pizza stone specifically designed for a
grill? The standard stones
tend to crack because of the high grate heat underneath, and the sudden
change in temp. on the top
when you open the hood. At least I have wiped out two that way.
I've never felt you could do a decent pizza on the grill. At least mine
have flopped. However
in another NG a poster makes pizza margherita on the grill. It strikes me
that should work
better than in the oven. You should be able to get your stone hotter, and
the temp. on the top of the pizza
isn't as much of an issue when you are making sausage pizza.. The thin
crust should cook in just a couple of minutes, as it should.
TIA,

Kent


Big Green Egg makes several sizes.

Or you could buy a frbrament stone

http://www.bakingstone.com/grilling.php

BOB


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Old 05-08-2007, 03:53 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??

Kent wrote:
Does anyone know where to buy a pizza stone specifically designed for a
grill? The standard stones


This is a slightly oblique reply, but it might be of use.

Baking involves a certain amount of heat from above, whether
you're doing pizza or bread.

It's possible to do quite good bread on a cheap gas grill by lining
the grill with aluminium foil, placing a pan of water on the heat
radiators and putting the baking surface (a big cast iron skillet
in my case) on the grill. This would limit the thermal stress on
a baking stone, also.

The pan of water keeps direct heat off the baking surface and prevents
drying. The aluminum foil insulates the box and reflects radiant heat
around to the top of the baking surface.

One can adjust the ratio of top heat to bottom heat by varying the
size of the water pan, skipping the water or removing it completely.

I'm doing this with an old Sunbeam Grillmaster 540, the only oddity
is that the "lava rocks" have been replaced by pieces of angle iron.
[actually, it's pieces of a cut-up steel bedframe].

bob prohaska

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Old 05-08-2007, 05:01 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??

On Sat, 4 Aug 2007 15:55:56 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

....The standard stones tend to crack because of the high grate heat
underneath, and the sudden change in temp. on the top
when you open the hood. At least I have wiped out two that way.


Mine, often at 750 deg.F on my grill, is ten years old, and has no problem
handling the heat, or the opened lid, or food being placed on it.

An identical stone in my oven is ten years old, goes through all the
self-cleaning cycles, and has had no problems when the door is opened at 550+,
or food is placed on it at that temperature.

I've never felt you could do a decent pizza on the grill. At least mine have
flopped.


Our grilled pizzas are wonderful. Those at Al Forno in Providence are out of
this world.

Your problems seem to have only one element in common, from your posting: you.
8

-- Larry
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Old 05-08-2007, 06:14 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"pltrgyst" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 4 Aug 2007 15:55:56 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

....The standard stones tend to crack because of the high grate heat
underneath, and the sudden change in temp. on the top
when you open the hood. At least I have wiped out two that way.


Mine, often at 750 deg.F on my grill, is ten years old, and has no problem
handling the heat, or the opened lid, or food being placed on it.

An identical stone in my oven is ten years old, goes through all the
self-cleaning cycles, and has had no problems when the door is opened at
550+,
or food is placed on it at that temperature.

I've never felt you could do a decent pizza on the grill. At least mine
have
flopped.


Our grilled pizzas are wonderful. Those at Al Forno in Providence are out
of
this world.

Your problems seem to have only one element in common, from your posting:
you.
8

-- Larry


What kind of stone are you using? Do you place it directly on the grate, or
do you suspend it?
IF so , what kind of grates are you using. I haven't had a problem getting
the stone to a high temp. The problem I see with this is that the temp.
above the stone is much cooler than the temp. above
the stone in the home oven, particularly when the outside weather is cool or
cold.

Do you make sausage pizza outside? This is where the above would most
important. Do you do anything to precook the sausage?

TIA,

Kent




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Old 05-08-2007, 06:15 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"bob prohaska's usenet account" wrote in message
. net...
Kent wrote:
Does anyone know where to buy a pizza stone specifically designed for a
grill? The standard stones


This is a slightly oblique reply, but it might be of use.

Baking involves a certain amount of heat from above, whether
you're doing pizza or bread.

It's possible to do quite good bread on a cheap gas grill by lining
the grill with aluminium foil, placing a pan of water on the heat
radiators and putting the baking surface (a big cast iron skillet
in my case) on the grill. This would limit the thermal stress on
a baking stone, also.

The pan of water keeps direct heat off the baking surface and prevents
drying. The aluminum foil insulates the box and reflects radiant heat
around to the top of the baking surface.

One can adjust the ratio of top heat to bottom heat by varying the
size of the water pan, skipping the water or removing it completely.

I'm doing this with an old Sunbeam Grillmaster 540, the only oddity
is that the "lava rocks" have been replaced by pieces of angle iron.
[actually, it's pieces of a cut-up steel bedframe].

bob prohaska


The foil is a great idea! The water pan is as well. You're mimicking a
baker's oven in your patio.
Thanks,

Kent


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Old 07-08-2007, 03:54 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??

On Aug 5, 1:14 pm, "Kent" wrote:
"pltrgyst" wrote in message\


The problem I see with this is that the temp.
above the stone is much cooler than the temp. above
the stone in the home oven, particularly when the outside weather is cool or
cold.


I don't use a grill, but asking: is there a place for a second stone
in your grill?
The reason I ask is: I use two stones in my home oven. One to cook
the pizza on; the second sits above it on another rack.
(I heat both minimum 45 minutes prior to cooking.)

No flaming me, please, for wasting energy; I use the heat for other
things.
Dee

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Old 07-08-2007, 05:26 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
ups.com...
On Aug 5, 1:14 pm, "Kent" wrote:
"pltrgyst" wrote in message\


The problem I see with this is that the temp.
above the stone is much cooler than the temp. above
the stone in the home oven, particularly when the outside weather is cool
or
cold.


I don't use a grill, but asking: is there a place for a second stone
in your grill?
The reason I ask is: I use two stones in my home oven. One to cook
the pizza on; the second sits above it on another rack.
(I heat both minimum 45 minutes prior to cooking.)

No flaming me, please, for wasting energy; I use the heat for other
things.
Dee


Dee, I've never felt trying to bake a pizza on an outdoor grill makes any
sense.
Pizza Margherita, however, with its ultrathin crust and only three
ingredients[cheese, fresh tomato, basil] should have a stone temp. of 700F
so it can bake in two minutes.
The home oven can't do this unless you use the cleaning cycle, which most of
us are adverse to.
A gas grill, however, will heat a stone to 700F. You can make a Margherita
in 2-3 minutes.
My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort. I'm still
struggling, however.

Kent,

constantly struggling to live with his level of ignorance.




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Old 07-08-2007, 05:48 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"Kent" wrote in message
. ..

My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort. I'm still
struggling, however.

Kent, constantly struggling to live with his level of ignorance.

Dear Kent,
If you have read the posting that a poster gave you regarding FibraMent,
what is your objection to it?
Have you called them to ally your concerns?
http://www.bakingstone.com/grilling.php

Quote
Because no baking stone can be exposed directly to flame, FibraMent for
Grills includes a protective metal pan. FibraMent is placed in the metal
pan while it bakes your favorite pizza.
Unquote.

I'd be considering this product very seriously and quit struggling ;-)

Dee, who bakes thin pizza in conventional oven, getting stones to 600 and
who takes bread baking and pizza making quite seriously.

Best of luck.






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Old 07-08-2007, 05:23 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??

On Mon, 6 Aug 2007 21:26:07 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

A gas grill, however, will heat a stone to 700F. You can make a Margherita
in 2-3 minutes.
My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort.


Have you considered trying a layer of cheap quarry tile under the pizza stone?

-- Larry


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Old 07-08-2007, 08:39 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"pltrgyst" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 6 Aug 2007 21:26:07 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

A gas grill, however, will heat a stone to 700F. You can make a Margherita
in 2-3 minutes.
My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort.


Have you considered trying a layer of cheap quarry tile under the pizza
stone?

-- Larry


Hmmm, sounds like a good idea, but on second thought, I'm wondering if that
extreme heat coming from the quarry tile might contribute to his cracking
another new stone? I don't know the physics of a metal pan vs. quarry tile
and heat.
Dee Dee


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Old 08-08-2007, 03:05 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"pltrgyst" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 6 Aug 2007 21:26:07 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

A gas grill, however, will heat a stone to 700F. You can make a Margherita
in 2-3 minutes.
My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort.


Have you considered trying a layer of cheap quarry tile under the pizza
stone?

-- Larry


I suspect it would work better than a metal pan. The problem is that it
would take forever
to get both the quarry tile and the pizza stone to 700F.

Kent


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Old 08-08-2007, 03:08 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"Kent" wrote in message
. ..

"pltrgyst" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 6 Aug 2007 21:26:07 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

A gas grill, however, will heat a stone to 700F. You can make a
Margherita
in 2-3 minutes.
My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort.


Have you considered trying a layer of cheap quarry tile under the pizza
stone?

-- Larry


I suspect it would work better than a metal pan. The problem is that it
would take forever
to get both the quarry tile and the pizza stone to 700F.

Kent

How long does it take to get the pizza stone to 700?
Dee Dee


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Old 08-08-2007, 03:13 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
...

"Kent" wrote in message
. ..

My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort. I'm
still struggling, however.

Kent, constantly struggling to live with his level of ignorance.

Dear Kent,
If you have read the posting that a poster gave you regarding FibraMent,
what is your objection to it?
Have you called them to ally your concerns?
http://www.bakingstone.com/grilling.php

Quote
Because no baking stone can be exposed directly to flame, FibraMent for
Grills includes a protective metal pan. FibraMent is placed in the metal
pan while it bakes your favorite pizza.
Unquote.

I'd be considering this product very seriously and quit struggling ;-)

Dee, who bakes thin pizza in conventional oven, getting stones to 600 and
who takes bread baking and pizza making quite seriously.

Best of luck.


AT $64, or whatever for the Fibrament, and the limited frequency that I
leave the kitchen to do this, it's not worth it. Dee, what kind of
preferment do you use for your pizza, if any? Do you try to mimick Italian
00 flour, or do you just use "all purpose"? What is your water to flour
ratio? I like a long ferment, and a wet dough, like dough for Ciabatta,
which is one reason directly grilling on the grill isn't too easy.
What prompted this thread is that for the thin crust Margherita the extra
100F really made a difference. I make almost all pizza in the oven on the
preheated stone.
Cheers

Kent







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Old 08-08-2007, 03:25 AM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default pizza stone for outdoor grill??


"Dee Dee" wrote in message
...

"Kent" wrote in message
. ..

"pltrgyst" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 6 Aug 2007 21:26:07 -0700, "Kent" wrote:

A gas grill, however, will heat a stone to 700F. You can make a
Margherita
in 2-3 minutes.
My problem has been that I have cracked three pizza stones. I'm trying
to
solve that and the best idea I've come up with so far is to shield the
bottom of the stone from the fire with a metal pan of some sort.

Have you considered trying a layer of cheap quarry tile under the pizza
stone?

-- Larry


I suspect it would work better than a metal pan. The problem is that it
would take forever
to get both the quarry tile and the pizza stone to 700F.

Kent

How long does it take to get the pizza stone to 700?
Dee Dee

The 3rd stone that cracked was onsale at Macy's for about $10. It was so
cheap I couldn't
turn it down. I knew I was performing a $10 experiment. It wasn't as thick
as you might want, though becasue of that it heated promptly. On our medium
run of the mill gas grill[Weber Silver B, but with cast iron grates], it
took about 15 minutes. I didn't think it would get that hot, because that
Weber, like all gas grills, aren't hot enough to sear a steak. The stone did
get to a temp. higher than I can get it to in our home oven, and it made a
great Pizza Margherita[fresh sliced deseeded tomatos, fresh basil, and fresh
mozzarella, and nothing else].
As you know, fresh mozzarella is quite moist, and I think the few drops that
hit the stone cracked it.

Kent




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