General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-12-2004, 03:58 PM
Finocchio568
 
Posts: n/a
Default One 10" Tube Cake Pan = How Many 4" Mini Tube Pans?

I would like to bake a bunch of different types of cakes, using 4" inch, 1-cup
capacity tube cake pans.

For recipes that request one 10" tube cake pan, how many of those mini tube
cake pans do I need?

Thanks, Michael

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-12-2004, 09:42 PM
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Michael wrote:

I would bake to bake a bunch of different types of cakes, using 4" inch,
1-cup capacity tube cake pans.

For recipes that request one 10" tube cake pan, how many of those mini
tube cake pans do I need?


Easy way to find out: Fill a 10" tube pan with water, then ladle/pour out
the water into a measuring pitcher. The number of cups which fit in the pan
is the same as the number of 1-cup pans you'll need.

You can also figure it out using calculus: You want the volume of the solid
of rotation created by rotating a displaced parabola around the Y axis. The
outer edge of the parabola is 5" from the origin, the height of the parabola
is around four or five inches, and the inner edge is about an inch and a
half to two inches. The solution is left as an exercise for the student. [I
used to teach calculus.]

Bob


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-12-2004, 09:42 PM
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Michael wrote:

I would bake to bake a bunch of different types of cakes, using 4" inch,
1-cup capacity tube cake pans.

For recipes that request one 10" tube cake pan, how many of those mini
tube cake pans do I need?


Easy way to find out: Fill a 10" tube pan with water, then ladle/pour out
the water into a measuring pitcher. The number of cups which fit in the pan
is the same as the number of 1-cup pans you'll need.

You can also figure it out using calculus: You want the volume of the solid
of rotation created by rotating a displaced parabola around the Y axis. The
outer edge of the parabola is 5" from the origin, the height of the parabola
is around four or five inches, and the inner edge is about an inch and a
half to two inches. The solution is left as an exercise for the student. [I
used to teach calculus.]

Bob


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-12-2004, 10:22 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Boob"virtualgoth writes:

Michael wrote:

I would bake to bake a bunch of different types of cakes, using 4" inch,
1-cup capacity tube cake pans.

For recipes that request one 10" tube cake pan, how many of those mini
tube cake pans do I need?


Easy way to find out: Fill a 10" tube pan with water, then ladle/pour out
the water into a measuring pitcher. The number of cups which fit in the pan
is the same as the number of 1-cup pans you'll need.


You've obviously never baked a cake... cake batter does not get filled to the
top of the pan nor do all cake batters fill alike so it cannot be assumed that
any one cake batter fill formula works for all... like I said, you're no baker.

That said even if a recipe indicates at what level to fill a ten inch tube pan
it cannot be assumed that miniature pans are to be filled to the same level (or
proportionately by volume). Cake batter does not expand linearly by volume.
Essentially one needs to interpolate based on past experience (if any) and
experiment.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-12-2004, 10:22 PM
PENMART01
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Boob"virtualgoth writes:

Michael wrote:

I would bake to bake a bunch of different types of cakes, using 4" inch,
1-cup capacity tube cake pans.

For recipes that request one 10" tube cake pan, how many of those mini
tube cake pans do I need?


Easy way to find out: Fill a 10" tube pan with water, then ladle/pour out
the water into a measuring pitcher. The number of cups which fit in the pan
is the same as the number of 1-cup pans you'll need.


You've obviously never baked a cake... cake batter does not get filled to the
top of the pan nor do all cake batters fill alike so it cannot be assumed that
any one cake batter fill formula works for all... like I said, you're no baker.

That said even if a recipe indicates at what level to fill a ten inch tube pan
it cannot be assumed that miniature pans are to be filled to the same level (or
proportionately by volume). Cake batter does not expand linearly by volume.
Essentially one needs to interpolate based on past experience (if any) and
experiment.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-12-2004, 06:17 AM
DJS0302
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Michael wrote:

I would bake to bake a bunch of different types of cakes, using 4" inch,
1-cup capacity tube cake pans.

For recipes that request one 10" tube cake pan, how many of those mini
tube cake pans do I need?


Easy way to find out: Fill a 10" tube pan with water, then ladle/pour out
the water into a measuring pitcher. The number of cups which fit in the pan
is the same as the number of 1-cup pans you'll need.

You can also figure it out using calculus: You want the volume of the solid
of rotation created by rotating a displaced parabola around the Y axis. The
outer edge of the parabola is 5" from the origin, the height of the parabola
is around four or five inches, and the inner edge is about an inch and a
half to two inches. The solution is left as an exercise for the student. [I
used to teach calculus.]

Bob


I thought about telling him to use geometry to calculate the volumes of the
pans. Geometry was one of my best subjects. I hated calculus however. I took
pre-calculus and regular calculus and after that I never used calculus again.
That was 20 years ago. The only thing I remember about it is derivatives.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-12-2004, 06:17 AM
DJS0302
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Michael wrote:

I would bake to bake a bunch of different types of cakes, using 4" inch,
1-cup capacity tube cake pans.

For recipes that request one 10" tube cake pan, how many of those mini
tube cake pans do I need?


Easy way to find out: Fill a 10" tube pan with water, then ladle/pour out
the water into a measuring pitcher. The number of cups which fit in the pan
is the same as the number of 1-cup pans you'll need.

You can also figure it out using calculus: You want the volume of the solid
of rotation created by rotating a displaced parabola around the Y axis. The
outer edge of the parabola is 5" from the origin, the height of the parabola
is around four or five inches, and the inner edge is about an inch and a
half to two inches. The solution is left as an exercise for the student. [I
used to teach calculus.]

Bob


I thought about telling him to use geometry to calculate the volumes of the
pans. Geometry was one of my best subjects. I hated calculus however. I took
pre-calculus and regular calculus and after that I never used calculus again.
That was 20 years ago. The only thing I remember about it is derivatives.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-12-2004, 10:10 AM
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PENMARTHA wrote:

You've obviously never baked a cake... cake batter does not get filled to
the top of the pan nor do all cake batters fill alike so it cannot be
assumed that any one cake batter fill formula works for all... like I
said, you're no baker.

That said even if a recipe indicates at what level to fill a ten inch tube
pan it cannot be assumed that miniature pans are to be filled to the same
level (or proportionately by volume). Cake batter does not expand linearly
by volume. Essentially one needs to interpolate based on past experience
(if any) and experiment.


Portnoy, you have no clue as to what I've done or not done. The poster
wanted to know equivalence. I told him how to determine equivalence. You
didn't even make an attempt to do that, so just shut the **** up.

By the way, schmendrick, cake batter *does* expand in roughly linear
proportion to its original volume, although it might get a slight kick if
it's got double-acting baking powder. If you REALLY had the expertise you
claim, you should have known that.

Bob


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-12-2004, 10:10 AM
Bob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PENMARTHA wrote:

You've obviously never baked a cake... cake batter does not get filled to
the top of the pan nor do all cake batters fill alike so it cannot be
assumed that any one cake batter fill formula works for all... like I
said, you're no baker.

That said even if a recipe indicates at what level to fill a ten inch tube
pan it cannot be assumed that miniature pans are to be filled to the same
level (or proportionately by volume). Cake batter does not expand linearly
by volume. Essentially one needs to interpolate based on past experience
(if any) and experiment.


Portnoy, you have no clue as to what I've done or not done. The poster
wanted to know equivalence. I told him how to determine equivalence. You
didn't even make an attempt to do that, so just shut the **** up.

By the way, schmendrick, cake batter *does* expand in roughly linear
proportion to its original volume, although it might get a slight kick if
it's got double-acting baking powder. If you REALLY had the expertise you
claim, you should have known that.

Bob




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
tube pans? notbob General Cooking 58 24-12-2014 01:32 AM
chocolate vegan cake - you tube higher elvisarchy Vegan 0 23-05-2008 05:31 AM
Teflon-coated Tube Pan for Angelfood Cake? Vox Humana Baking 4 21-06-2005 04:37 AM
Teflon-Coated Tube Pan for Angelfood Cake? Wayne Boatwright General Cooking 2 20-06-2005 06:24 PM
One 10" Tube Cake Pan = How Many 4" Mini Tube Pans? Finocchio568 Baking 2 13-12-2004 03:09 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:48 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017