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Old 28-04-2014, 02:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon in
water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the water
boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium low and
cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?


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Old 28-04-2014, 03:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On Monday, April 28, 2014 7:00:52 AM UTC-7, Sqwertz wrote:
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 08:07:14 -0500, Phyllis Stone wrote:



In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon in


water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the water


boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium low and


cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?




Yes. It leaches all the salt and flavor out of the bacon and leaves

it burnt onto the bottom of the pan. Stick with the oven-sheet

pan-optional rack method, especially if you want to cook any sort of

quantity (more than 7 ounces at a time).



-sw



what he said. I cook a lot of bacon at one time in the oven. Then I keep it in the fridge for uses all week. It's the best methodology for perfectly done bacon.

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Old 28-04-2014, 03:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 07:12:17 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
wrote:

On Monday, April 28, 2014 7:00:52 AM UTC-7, Sqwertz wrote:
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 08:07:14 -0500, Phyllis Stone wrote:



In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon in


water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the water


boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium low and


cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?




Yes. It leaches all the salt and flavor out of the bacon and leaves

it burnt onto the bottom of the pan. Stick with the oven-sheet

pan-optional rack method, especially if you want to cook any sort of

quantity (more than 7 ounces at a time).



-sw



what he said. I cook a lot of bacon at one time in the oven. Then I keep it in the fridge for uses all week. It's the best methodology for perfectly done bacon.


I have a 14" pan with high sides (more like a chicken fryer) that can
easily cook a whole pound of bacon at a time... the high sides cut way
down on spatter.
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Old 28-04-2014, 04:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 08:07:14 -0500, "Phyllis Stone"
wrote:

In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon in
water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the water
boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium low and
cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?


No. That's a new one and it sounds as silly as deep frying bacon.


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Old 28-04-2014, 04:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On 4/28/2014 8:07 AM, Phyllis Stone wrote:
In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon
in water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the
water boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium
low and cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?


Not with bacon, but I do that with sausage.

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Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

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Old 28-04-2014, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

Phyllis Stone wrote:
In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking
bacon in water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover.
When the water boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn
heat to medium low and cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of
this and tried it?


This is not new - my wife, whose mother was Welsh, grew up on boiled
bacon and hates it (and still talksa about it)to this day.

There is nothing good about this, save the fact that the "recipe" you
cite has you cook it until the water is gone and then you get to fry it
as the good Lord intended. If you see someone doing this, scream and
run away.

-S-


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Old 28-04-2014, 06:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Phyllis Stone" wrote in message
...
In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon
in water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the
water boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium
low and cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?


Many times I will soak bacon in water overnight before frying which makes it
taste more like side pork, but I have never actually cooked it in water.

Cheri

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Old 28-04-2014, 07:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On 4/28/2014 11:56 AM, Janet Wilder wrote:
On 4/28/2014 8:07 AM, Phyllis Stone wrote:
In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon
in water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the
water boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium
low and cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?


Not with bacon, but I do that with sausage.



Yes, but I bring the water maybe half way up the side. It helps to cook
it through and once the water is gone, you can get the casing done.
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Old 28-04-2014, 07:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 10:56:19 -0500, Janet Wilder
wrote:

On 4/28/2014 8:07 AM, Phyllis Stone wrote:
In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon
in water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the
water boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium
low and cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?


Not with bacon, but I do that with sausage.


Yes! Steam first to cook through, then brown the outside.


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Good Memories.


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Old 28-04-2014, 08:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On 4/28/2014 2:58 PM, sf wrote:
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 10:56:19 -0500, Janet Wilder
wrote:

On 4/28/2014 8:07 AM, Phyllis Stone wrote:
In one of the cooking magazines there are instructions for cooking bacon
in water. It says to put in skillet with enough water to cover. When the
water boils lower heat to medium. Once water is gone turn heat to medium
low and cook until crisp. Has anyone ever heard of this and tried it?


Not with bacon, but I do that with sausage.


Yes! Steam first to cook through, then brown the outside.


Yeppers. I mostly do that with Italian sausage or fresh bratwurst.

Jill
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Old 28-04-2014, 09:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 08:08:26 -0700, sf wrote:

No. That's a new one and it sounds as silly as deep frying bacon.


Deep frying bacon is the best way to cook it f you're in a restaurant
kitchen with nice deep, always-on fryers with vent hoods. But it's
not worth doing at home unless you already have oil on for something
else.



We always used salamanders for bacon. Wasting 5 gallons of oil got
expensive fast.



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Old 29-04-2014, 03:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 13:22:25 -0700, Paul M. Cook wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 08:08:26 -0700, sf wrote:

No. That's a new one and it sounds as silly as deep frying bacon.

Deep frying bacon is the best way to cook it f you're in a restaurant
kitchen with nice deep, always-on fryers with vent hoods. But it's
not worth doing at home unless you already have oil on for something
else.


We always used salamanders for bacon. Wasting 5 gallons of oil got
expensive fast.


Most restaurants always have filtered fryers going. You're not
wasting oil, you're adding to it. Much more efficient.


If you want everything fried to taste like bacon.



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Old 29-04-2014, 05:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 19:14:44 -0700, Paul M. Cook wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 13:22:25 -0700, Paul M. Cook wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 08:08:26 -0700, sf wrote:

No. That's a new one and it sounds as silly as deep frying bacon.

Deep frying bacon is the best way to cook it f you're in a restaurant
kitchen with nice deep, always-on fryers with vent hoods. But it's
not worth doing at home unless you already have oil on for something
else.

We always used salamanders for bacon. Wasting 5 gallons of oil got
expensive fast.

Most restaurants always have filtered fryers going. You're not
wasting oil, you're adding to it. Much more efficient.


If you want everything fried to taste like bacon.


It doesn't. The amount of bacon fat in the fryer is negligible. And
bacon fat doesn't taste much like bacon assuming the fryer filter is
doing it's job.


Fryer filters remove particulates which burn and prematurely destroy he oil.
They do not remove flavor and smoked bacon has a heavy hickory aroma which
you cannot get rid of.

I thought you were too busy inventing the INternet to be working in a
restaurant for any length of time?


I am a multi-tasker. I worked all through college. 40-50 hours a week.



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Old 29-04-2014, 05:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default cooking bacon in water

On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 21:00:02 -0700, "Paul M. Cook"
wrote:


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 19:14:44 -0700, Paul M. Cook wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 13:22:25 -0700, Paul M. Cook wrote:

"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 08:08:26 -0700, sf wrote:

No. That's a new one and it sounds as silly as deep frying bacon.

Deep frying bacon is the best way to cook it f you're in a restaurant
kitchen with nice deep, always-on fryers with vent hoods. But it's
not worth doing at home unless you already have oil on for something
else.

We always used salamanders for bacon. Wasting 5 gallons of oil got
expensive fast.

Most restaurants always have filtered fryers going. You're not
wasting oil, you're adding to it. Much more efficient.

If you want everything fried to taste like bacon.


It doesn't. The amount of bacon fat in the fryer is negligible. And
bacon fat doesn't taste much like bacon assuming the fryer filter is
doing it's job.


Fryer filters remove particulates which burn and prematurely destroy he oil.
They do not remove flavor and smoked bacon has a heavy hickory aroma which
you cannot get rid of.


No need to dispose of it, the deep fryer used for bacon is drained and
that fat is stored in the walk-in reefer until the next batch of bacon
needs cooking. Restaurants will cook a week's worth at a time and
store it in the fridge for use as needed, then they reheat a portion
or three in a small amount of hot oil, typically a sauce pan with a
fry basket. I deep fried bacon to feed 400 every day. There is no
other way to fry that much bacon from raw to feed so many in forty
minutes. Restaurants that do a large breakfast business (like IHOP,
HoJos, etal.) do exactly the same. And used cooking fat isn't wasted,
it's sold to fat brokers who guard their route, there's big bucks in
used cooking fat, plus it's illegal to dump it with waste water or in
landfills. Used cooking fat is reclaimed and used for many everyday
products, from dried animal feed, to cosmetics, all kinds of soaps,
etc. Dried animal feed uses more reclaimed cooking fat than all other
uses combined. Lipstick is reclaimed cooking fat.


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