General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-01-2013, 07:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,879
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

If memory serves, we recently had a discussion about recipe differences
between pancakes and waffles. I think my wife had found a pancake mix
here that suggested leaving out the egg yolks (or maybe it was the egg
whites) when preparing this mix for waffles instead of pancakes.

Today, I happened to be going through the pantry, looking for things I
could use up, and found one open and one unopened box of Pumpkin Pancake
and Waffle Mix, presumably from November (think: Thanksgiving) from
Trader Joe's. This box says to substitute water for the milk, in equal
quantity, IOW, milk gives you pancake batter but the same amount of
water instead gives you waffle batter.

I will start by asking if there is _any_ compelling reason to even
change the recipe at all? The only thing I can think of is, since the
waffle iron contains the batter, it can be thinner - that seems a reason
to me, and using water instead of milk would result in thinner batter,
so I think I'm on board with that particular change. Would using milk
in the waffle batter tend to make it stick to the waffle iron, or create
"too-fluffy" waffles, if there is such a thing?

If anyone would care to track down and review that other recent thread
and/or contribute anything else, that'd be great.

Thanks very much and, yes, I do cook from scratch sometimes, not from
mixes and frozen food, just not during my busy season of work, which is
right now. I'm curious about this in an Alton Brown kind of way.
I'd like to know if there is any sound reasoning and science behind
these changes.

Thanks again.

-S-



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-01-2013, 07:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,789
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

On Sun, 27 Jan 2013 13:17:19 -0500, "Steve Freides"
wrote:


I will start by asking if there is _any_ compelling reason to even
change the recipe at all? The only thing I can think of is, since the
waffle iron contains the batter, it can be thinner - that seems a reason
to me, and using water instead of milk would result in thinner batter,
so I think I'm on board with that particular change. Would using milk
in the waffle batter tend to make it stick to the waffle iron, or create
"too-fluffy" waffles, if there is such a thing?


Aren't people always asking here how to make crispy waffles? Using
water instead of milk would be one way. Milk will make a "tender"
pancake.

--
Food is an important part of a balanced diet.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-01-2013, 08:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,879
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

sf wrote:
On Sun, 27 Jan 2013 13:17:19 -0500, "Steve Freides"
wrote:


I will start by asking if there is _any_ compelling reason to even
change the recipe at all? The only thing I can think of is, since
the waffle iron contains the batter, it can be thinner - that seems
a reason to me, and using water instead of milk would result in
thinner batter, so I think I'm on board with that particular change.
Would using milk in the waffle batter tend to make it stick to the
waffle iron, or create "too-fluffy" waffles, if there is such a
thing?


Aren't people always asking here how to make crispy waffles? Using
water instead of milk would be one way. Milk will make a "tender"
pancake.


Good to know. Today, I used a little half and half, a little coconut
milk, but mostly water, and the waffles were pretty soft. (I made a
double recipe and a package of bacon, and I've got only 2 waffles and 2
strips of bacon left. Those teenage boys can eat ...)

-S-


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-01-2013, 08:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,946
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences



"Steve Freides" wrote in message
...

Good to know. Today, I used a little half and half, a little coconut
milk, but mostly water, and the waffles were pretty soft. (I made a
double recipe and a package of bacon, and I've got only 2 waffles and 2
strips of bacon left. Those teenage boys can eat ...)


I bet you haven't only just found that out ... g
--
--
http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-01-2013, 09:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 35,884
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

On 27/01/2013 1:17 PM, Steve Freides wrote:

I will start by asking if there is _any_ compelling reason to even
change the recipe at all? The only thing I can think of is, since the
waffle iron contains the batter, it can be thinner - that seems a reason
to me, and using water instead of milk would result in thinner batter,
so I think I'm on board with that particular change. Would using milk
in the waffle batter tend to make it stick to the waffle iron, or create
"too-fluffy" waffles, if there is such a thing?



Not really. Pancake recipes vary and waffle recipes vary. I make no
claim to being an expert on waffles, but I do make them about once a
month, so that probably gives me more experience with them than most
people. The only real difference between the batters that I use is that
I separate the eggs, beat the whites and then fold them in.




Thanks very much and, yes, I do cook from scratch sometimes, not from
mixes and frozen food, just not during my busy season of work, which is
right now. I'm curious about this in an Alton Brown kind of way.
I'd like to know if there is any sound reasoning and science behind
these changes.


Pancake mix is one of my pet peeves. While some here have claimed that
they are good add water only mixes, I haven't found any that rival home
made. The other mixes usually want you to add milk, eggs and oil, and
tht means that you are paying big bucks for a mix that is just flour,
salt, sugar and baking powder. You use so little of them that their cost
is negligible.



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-01-2013, 01:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,879
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

Ophelia wrote:
"Steve Freides" wrote in message
...

Good to know. Today, I used a little half and half, a little coconut
milk, but mostly water, and the waffles were pretty soft. (I made a
double recipe and a package of bacon, and I've got only 2 waffles
and 2 strips of bacon left. Those teenage boys can eat ...)


I bet you haven't only just found that out ... g


True, that...

-S-


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-01-2013, 01:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,879
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

Dave Smith wrote:
On 27/01/2013 1:17 PM, Steve Freides wrote:

I will start by asking if there is _any_ compelling reason to even
change the recipe at all? The only thing I can think of is, since
the waffle iron contains the batter, it can be thinner - that seems
a reason to me, and using water instead of milk would result in
thinner batter, so I think I'm on board with that particular change.
Would using milk in the waffle batter tend to make it stick to the
waffle iron, or create "too-fluffy" waffles, if there is such a
thing?



Not really. Pancake recipes vary and waffle recipes vary. I make no
claim to being an expert on waffles, but I do make them about once a
month, so that probably gives me more experience with them than most
people. The only real difference between the batters that I use is
that I separate the eggs, beat the whites and then fold them in.


Thank you - we'll have to try that - separate the eggs, beat the whites,
fold them in - sounds worth trying.

Thanks very much and, yes, I do cook from scratch sometimes, not from
mixes and frozen food, just not during my busy season of work, which
is right now. I'm curious about this in an Alton Brown kind of
way. I'd like to know if there is any sound reasoning and science
behind these changes.


Pancake mix is one of my pet peeves. While some here have claimed
that they are good add water only mixes, I haven't found any that
rival home made. The other mixes usually want you to add milk, eggs
and oil, and tht means that you are paying big bucks for a mix that
is just flour, salt, sugar and baking powder. You use so little of
them that their cost is negligible.


In the grand scheme of things, it's not a lot of money, and today's
offering, Pumpkin Pancakes, is something that would have turned out to
be a project, I'm sure. This mix called for water/milk, eggs, and
butter. Your point is noted, however, and I will either feel guilty
or make from scratch as soon as I finish the box of Pumpkin Pancake
mix.

-S-


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-01-2013, 07:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 842
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

On Jan 27, 1:17*pm, "Steve Freides" wrote:
If memory serves, we recently had a discussion about recipe differences
between pancakes and waffles. I think my wife had found a pancake mix
here that suggested leaving out the egg yolks (or maybe it was the egg
whites) when preparing this mix for waffles instead of pancakes.

Today, I happened to be going through the pantry, looking for things I
could use up, and found one open and one unopened box of Pumpkin Pancake
and Waffle Mix, presumably from November (think: Thanksgiving) from
Trader Joe's. *This box says to substitute water for the milk, in equal
quantity, IOW, milk gives you pancake batter but the same amount of
water instead gives you waffle batter.

I will start by asking if there is _any_ compelling reason to even
change the recipe at all? *The only thing I can think of is, since the
waffle iron contains the batter, it can be thinner - that seems a reason
to me, and using water instead of milk would result in thinner batter,
so I think I'm on board with that particular change. *Would using milk
in the waffle batter tend to make it stick to the waffle iron, or create
"too-fluffy" waffles, if there is such a thing?

If anyone would care to track down and review that other recent thread
and/or contribute anything else, that'd be great.

Thanks very much and, yes, I do cook from scratch sometimes, not from
mixes and frozen food, just not during my busy season of work, which is
right now. *I'm curious about this in an Alton Brown kind of way.
I'd like to know if there is any sound reasoning and science behind
these changes.

Thanks again.

-S-


The only real difference between waffles and pancakes is the cooking
method. Pancakes turn out fluffy because there's nothing on the top
surface of the pancake to keep them from rising. Waffles, on the
other hand, are baked in an enclosed vessel and can only rise as much
as the waffle iron will allow. They're also cooked on both sides at
once. This makes them turn out crispier.
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-01-2013, 01:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 23,520
Default Pancakes To Waffles - Recipe Differences

Dave Smith wrote:

Pancake mix is one of my pet peeves. While some here have claimed that
they are good add water only mixes, I haven't found any that rival home
made.


I completely agree with you, Dave. A couple of months ago, I got a gift food
pack from some friends. One of the things in there was a small bag of dry
pancake mix. It said to only add water. I finally tried it and it was
horrible. The pancakes stuck to my buttered non-stick pan. If I decide to
use it again, I'm going to treat it as flour only and add my own
ingredients....milk, egg

I normally make my pancakes from scratch using an old Betty Crocker recipe
and they are very good. I always add more milk than the recipe calls for
since I like mine thin (and more moist).

That gift pack *did* include a small (half pint) of real maple syrup and
that's good.

Gary


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
On waffles, pancakes, and Laura Ingalls Wilder [email protected] General Cooking 20 24-01-2015 04:59 AM
Breakfast: Pancakes or waffles? Andy[_15_] General Cooking 23 02-08-2009 12:29 AM
Excerpt: Crepes, Waffles & Pancakes! Jane Smith Recipes 0 12-12-2006 04:48 PM
Wayne - Pancakes or waffles? King's Crown General Cooking 2 22-01-2006 10:10 PM
Sourdough Pancakes and Waffles Recipe Tim Recipes 0 22-12-2005 12:14 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:05 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017