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Old 28-07-2012, 03:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

A friend of mine gave me some fresh green beans from her garden
yesterday. These are mature green beans, meaning they have gotten to
the stage where the bean has formed in the pod and the pod is no
longer pencil thin and smooth....it's fat and lumpy with the bean.

We all know these will be less tender and less sweet. I haven't had
any mature green beans for years, don't have a garden and when I buy
them at the market I always buy the young and tender ones.

so.......I'm going to cook them the old granny Southern way we used to
cook mature green beans when I was growing up. Long and slow.
These will be the type of green beans that a lot of people think about
who believe that Southerners overcook their vegetables. Of course
that's not true. We cook young green beans quickly and serve them
still tender crisp. But these older beans are going to be tender and
silky with a flavor that is out of this world.

I'll take off the 'strings', snap them into about 2" long pieces.

In my heavy pot I'll fry thin slices of 'fatback' or salt pork till
rendered and crispy. Then I'll add some good chicken stock, the green
beans and some chopped onion and let that
simmer for about an hour. Then I'll add some very small new red
potatoes, whole, to the pot and let it simmer till the potatoes are
completely tender. Salt and black pepper to taste. No, the beans
won't cook till mush. They will be silky tender and have a flavor
unlike you've ever had from green beans. And there will be this
fabulous 'pot liquor' as a bonus. I like to put the 'pot liquor'
over cornbread.

If you have never tried mature green beans this way, well, you've
missed out. If you get your hands on some mature green beans try
this. You will not be disappointed.


I'll post pictures later.



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Old 28-07-2012, 03:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On 2012-07-28, ImStillMags wrote:


still tender crisp. But these older beans are going to be tender and
silky with a flavor that is out of this world.


A Southern classic, to be sure, but yer not kidding anyone with that
term "silky".

nb

--
"I didn't know I worked here.
I must've forgot my apron"
Support labelling GMO foods
http://www.nongmoproject.org/
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Old 28-07-2012, 03:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

ImStillMags wrote:

In my heavy pot I'll fry thin slices of 'fatback' or salt pork till
rendered and crispy. Then I'll add some good chicken stock, the green
beans and some chopped onion and let that
simmer for about an hour. Then I'll add some very small new red
potatoes, whole, to the pot and let it simmer till the potatoes are
completely tender.


I'll be there as soon as I can! :-D

G.
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Old 28-07-2012, 05:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 07:46:13 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
wrote:

A friend of mine gave me some fresh green beans from her garden
yesterday. These are mature green beans, meaning they have gotten to
the stage where the bean has formed in the pod and the pod is no
longer pencil thin and smooth....it's fat and lumpy with the bean.

We all know these will be less tender and less sweet. I haven't had
any mature green beans for years, don't have a garden and when I buy
them at the market I always buy the young and tender ones.

so.......I'm going to cook them the old granny Southern way we used to
cook mature green beans when I was growing up. Long and slow.
These will be the type of green beans that a lot of people think about
who believe that Southerners overcook their vegetables. Of course
that's not true. We cook young green beans quickly and serve them
still tender crisp. But these older beans are going to be tender and
silky with a flavor that is out of this world.

I'll take off the 'strings', snap them into about 2" long pieces.

In my heavy pot I'll fry thin slices of 'fatback' or salt pork till
rendered and crispy. Then I'll add some good chicken stock, the green
beans and some chopped onion and let that
simmer for about an hour. Then I'll add some very small new red
potatoes, whole, to the pot and let it simmer till the potatoes are
completely tender. Salt and black pepper to taste. No, the beans
won't cook till mush. They will be silky tender and have a flavor
unlike you've ever had from green beans. And there will be this
fabulous 'pot liquor' as a bonus. I like to put the 'pot liquor'
over cornbread.

If you have never tried mature green beans this way, well, you've
missed out. If you get your hands on some mature green beans try
this. You will not be disappointed.


I'll post pictures later.


Some years I get so many green beans I tire of picking so I'll miss a
couple three days so some over mature, often I'll pick five to ten
pounds a day for a month. I give most away, at least try to. But
when sorting those I keep there are always some that are too mature.
I'll string them, cut them into one inch lengths, and freeze them. I
like to add those to the beef stews and vegetable soups I cook in
winter. The young ones I like to stirfry and add raw to tossed
salad... those skinny 2" long ones are great pickled, I can eat a
quart jar full at a sitting, and then use the pickling liquid for the
next batch. I love pickled veggies, I don't like cooked pickles, I
prefer the fermented method. This year I planted some Chinese long
beans.
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Old 28-07-2012, 06:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:50:11 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

snip
This year I planted some Chinese long
beans.


Let me know how those work out -- if you needed some special
trellising or whatever, if there is some special way to tell if they
are ready for picking -- you know, gardener stuff. I've been looking
at those seeds for a couple of years now and am thinking of trying
next year. Thanks
Janet US


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Old 28-07-2012, 06:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 11:09:49 -0600, Janet Bostwick
wrote:

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:50:11 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

snip
This year I planted some Chinese long
beans.


Let me know how those work out -- if you needed some special
trellising or whatever, if there is some special way to tell if they
are ready for picking -- you know, gardener stuff. I've been looking
at those seeds for a couple of years now and am thinking of trying
next year. Thanks
Janet US



They are also known as asparagus beans, yard long beans, Chinese
beans, among other names. There are a lot of different varieties of
them, but I find they do not taste or cook up like regular green
beans, even though the seed packs say they do. They need a bit more
cooking and are a bit tougher...good, mind you, quite good, but
different. I've tried picking them at various times of growth to see
if that makes a diff, but it doesn't.

They do not flower until they are QUITE tall, but once they start
fruiting they get going like mad and the wasps love the flowers.

I usually get my seeds from an Asian market nearby, but check out the
different kinds he

http://www.evergreenseeds.com/asbeanyarbea.html

Boron
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Old 28-07-2012, 06:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Jul 28, 10:25*am, Boron Elgar wrote:

They need a bit more cooking and are a bit tougher...good, mind you,
quite good, but
different.


Excellent beans for the old Southern methodology.
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Old 28-07-2012, 06:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Jul 28, 7:51*am, notbob wrote:
On 2012-07-28, ImStillMags wrote:

still tender crisp. *But these older beans are going to be tender and
silky with a flavor that is out of this world.


A Southern classic, to be sure, but yer not kidding anyone with that
term "silky". *

nb

--
"I didn't know I worked here.
I must've forgot my apron"
Support labelling GMO foodshttp://www.nongmoproject.org/


They are silky, unless you cook them to mush which you should not do.

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Old 28-07-2012, 06:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 07:46:13 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
wrote:

If you have never tried mature green beans this way, well, you've
missed out. If you get your hands on some mature green beans try
this. You will not be disappointed.


I'll post pictures later.


Sounds good, but I'd rather that you made it for me!


--

You are what you eat, so avoid fruitcake and nuts.
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Old 28-07-2012, 08:27 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ImStillMags View Post
so.......I'm going to cook them the old granny Southern way we used to
cook mature green beans when I was growing up. Long and slow.
These will be the type of green beans that a lot of people think about
who believe that Southerners overcook their vegetables. Of course
that's not true. We cook young green beans quickly and serve them
still tender crisp. But these older beans are going to be tender and
silky with a flavor that is out of this world.
I can remember my grandmother cooking her green beans like that, the only thing she did that you didn't mention was fix corn meal dumplings. But, I preferred the corn bread.


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Old 28-07-2012, 10:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 13:25:42 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 11:09:49 -0600, Janet Bostwick
wrote:

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:50:11 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

snip
This year I planted some Chinese long
beans.


Let me know how those work out -- if you needed some special
trellising or whatever, if there is some special way to tell if they
are ready for picking -- you know, gardener stuff. I've been looking
at those seeds for a couple of years now and am thinking of trying
next year. Thanks
Janet US



They are also known as asparagus beans, yard long beans, Chinese
beans, among other names. There are a lot of different varieties of
them, but I find they do not taste or cook up like regular green
beans, even though the seed packs say they do. They need a bit more
cooking and are a bit tougher...good, mind you, quite good, but
different. I've tried picking them at various times of growth to see
if that makes a diff, but it doesn't.

They do not flower until they are QUITE tall, but once they start
fruiting they get going like mad and the wasps love the flowers.

I usually get my seeds from an Asian market nearby, but check out the
different kinds he

http://www.evergreenseeds.com/asbeanyarbea.html

Boron


Good stuff to know. Thanks
Janet US
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Old 28-07-2012, 11:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On 7/28/2012 10:46 AM, ImStillMags wrote:
A friend of mine gave me some fresh green beans from her garden
yesterday. These are mature green beans, meaning they have gotten to
the stage where the bean has formed in the pod and the pod is no
longer pencil thin and smooth....it's fat and lumpy with the bean.

We all know these will be less tender and less sweet. I haven't had
any mature green beans for years, don't have a garden and when I buy
them at the market I always buy the young and tender ones.

so.......I'm going to cook them the old granny Southern way we used to
cook mature green beans when I was growing up. Long and slow.
These will be the type of green beans that a lot of people think about
who believe that Southerners overcook their vegetables. Of course
that's not true. We cook young green beans quickly and serve them
still tender crisp. But these older beans are going to be tender and
silky with a flavor that is out of this world.

I'll take off the 'strings', snap them into about 2" long pieces.

In my heavy pot I'll fry thin slices of 'fatback' or salt pork till
rendered and crispy. Then I'll add some good chicken stock, the green
beans and some chopped onion and let that
simmer for about an hour. Then I'll add some very small new red
potatoes, whole, to the pot and let it simmer till the potatoes are
completely tender. Salt and black pepper to taste. No, the beans
won't cook till mush. They will be silky tender and have a flavor
unlike you've ever had from green beans. And there will be this
fabulous 'pot liquor' as a bonus. I like to put the 'pot liquor'
over cornbread.

If you have never tried mature green beans this way, well, you've
missed out. If you get your hands on some mature green beans try
this. You will not be disappointed.


I'll post pictures later.


Sounds good to me! I think with older green beans I'd make them bacon
wrapped and roasted. Since it takes longer to cook bacon than normally
takes to cook beans, they'd be cooked to softer that way. However you
make them, enjoy the fresh ones!


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Old 29-07-2012, 12:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 11:09:49 -0600, Janet Bostwick
wrote:

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:50:11 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

snip
This year I planted some Chinese long
beans.


Let me know how those work out -- if you needed some special
trellising or whatever, if there is some special way to tell if they
are ready for picking -- you know, gardener stuff. I've been looking
at those seeds for a couple of years now and am thinking of trying
next year. Thanks
Janet US


I'll post pictures when they are ready to pick. I planted them up
against a turkey wire fence, they're on their own.
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Old 29-07-2012, 12:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 19:46:13 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 11:09:49 -0600, Janet Bostwick
wrote:

On Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:50:11 -0400, Brooklyn1 Gravesend1 wrote:

snip
This year I planted some Chinese long
beans.


Let me know how those work out -- if you needed some special
trellising or whatever, if there is some special way to tell if they
are ready for picking -- you know, gardener stuff. I've been looking
at those seeds for a couple of years now and am thinking of trying
next year. Thanks
Janet US


I'll post pictures when they are ready to pick. I planted them up
against a turkey wire fence, they're on their own.


thanks. I look forward to seeing the pictures.
Janet US
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Old 29-07-2012, 01:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Green beans w/pictures

On Jul 28, 3:19*pm, Cheryl wrote:

I'll post pictures later.


Sounds good to me! *I think with older green beans I'd make them bacon
wrapped and roasted. Since it takes longer to cook bacon than normally
takes to cook beans, they'd be cooked to softer that way. *However you
make them, enjoy the fresh ones!


Here are the pictures. You can start at the beginning and click
through them.
Boy are they good !!!

https://picasaweb.google.com/Sitara8...75051106442898



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