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Old 06-01-2011, 11:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I can
wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.



I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.

Does anybody know
a)why it happens with the pots I have.. what those pots might be made
from that causes it?

b)what pots I could get where that wouldn't happen?

The pots I have I don't know much about them but they're black inside,
so that may say something about the material what it is or isn't..

I am wondering if maybe a metallic one won't have the problem.. but I
don't know.

If they were cheap like £15 then I might buy one and find out.. but
i'm not sure where.. I am currently in the UK, I see
http://www.johnlewis.com/231034624/Product.aspx £35
but I don't want to throw money at that and find it keeps the fish
smell..




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Old 06-01-2011, 06:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On 6 Jan 2011 11:20:03 GMT, "Gareth Fimlinson"
wrote:

I am wondering if maybe a metallic one won't have the problem.. but I
don't know.

If they were cheap like £15 then I might buy one and find out.. but
i'm not sure where.. I am currently in the UK, I see
http://www.johnlewis.com/231034624/Product.aspx £35
but I don't want to throw money at that and find it keeps the fish
smell..


You need stainless steel and it's going to cost you some serious money
if you want a decent pan.

--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 06-01-2011, 06:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Jan 6, 3:20*am, "Gareth Fimlinson" wrote:
I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I can
wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.

I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.

Does anybody know
a)why it happens with the pots I have.. what those pots might be made
from that causes it?

b)what pots I could get where that wouldn't happen?

The pots I have I don't know much about them but they're black inside,
so that may say something about the material what it is or isn't..

I am wondering if maybe a metallic one won't have the problem.. but I
don't know.

If they were cheap like £15 then I might buy one and find out.. but
i'm not sure where.. *I am currently in the UK, I seehttp://www.johnlewis.com/231034624/Product.aspx* £35
but I don't want to throw money at that and find it keeps the fish
smell..


If they are black inside they are probably coated with a non stick
coating.
That is why they absorb the smells and tastes.

If you want good pots and pans, get stainless steel. good polished
stainless steel. The good stuff is not cheap but is worth it and
will last forever.

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Old 06-01-2011, 11:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

In article ,
"Gareth Fimlinson" wrote:

I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I can
wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.



I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.

Does anybody know
a)why it happens with the pots I have.. what those pots might be made
from that causes it?

b)what pots I could get where that wouldn't happen?


Any pot made of or lined with stainless steel.

Miche

--
Electricians do it in three phases
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Old 07-01-2011, 12:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cookingfish?

Gareth Fimlinson wrote:
I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I can
wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.



I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.

Does anybody know
a)why it happens with the pots I have.. what those pots might be made
from that causes it?

b)what pots I could get where that wouldn't happen?

The pots I have I don't know much about them but they're black inside,
so that may say something about the material what it is or isn't..

I am wondering if maybe a metallic one won't have the problem.. but I
don't know.

If they were cheap like £15 then I might buy one and find out.. but
i'm not sure where.. I am currently in the UK, I see
http://www.johnlewis.com/231034624/Product.aspx £35
but I don't want to throw money at that and find it keeps the fish
smell..





You want something that's stainless steel and not lined with Teflon.
Wash it gently with scouring powder and vinegar after you cook
especially smelly fish. Or use "Barkeepers Friend", which contains
an acid (not sure if you can get that in the UK.) Don't scrub it
too hard or the scouring powder will scratch the finish. (don't
scrub the outside at all.) HTH

-Bob


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Old 07-01-2011, 12:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Jan 6, 5:20*am, "Gareth Fimlinson" wrote:
I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I can
wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.

I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.

Does anybody know
a)why it happens with the pots I have.. what those pots might be made
from that causes it?

b)what pots I could get where that wouldn't happen?

The pots I have I don't know much about them but they're black inside,
so that may say something about the material what it is or isn't..

I am wondering if maybe a metallic one won't have the problem.. but I
don't know.

If they were cheap like £15 then I might buy one and find out.. but
i'm not sure where.. *I am currently in the UK, I seehttp://www.johnlewis.com/231034624/Product.aspx* £35
but I don't want to throw money at that and find it keeps the fish
smell..


Glass?

John Kuthe...
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Old 07-01-2011, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

"Gareth Fimlinson" wrote:

I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I can

wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.

I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.


Porcelainized steel.
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

ImStillMags wrote:

On Jan 6, 3:20*am, "Gareth Fimlinson" wrote:
I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I
can wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.

I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.

Does anybody know
a)why it happens with the pots I have.. what those pots might be
made from that causes it?

b)what pots I could get where that wouldn't happen?

The pots I have I don't know much about them but they're black
inside, so that may say something about the material what it is or
isn't..

I am wondering if maybe a metallic one won't have the problem.. but
I don't know.

If they were cheap like £15 then I might buy one and find out..
but i'm not sure where.. *I am currently in the UK, I
seehttp://www.johnlewis.com/231034624/Product.aspx* £35 but I don't
want to throw money at that and find it keeps the fish smell..


If they are black inside they are probably coated with a non stick
coating.
That is why they absorb the smells and tastes.

If you want good pots and pans, get stainless steel. good polished
stainless steel. The good stuff is not cheap but is worth it and
will last forever.



what's this about different types of stainless steel pot.

-(plain) stainless steel
-polished stainless steel (same as porcelainized)?

no teflon (I guess if it's silver inside then it's no teflon and the
black inside ones are teflon, right?)

does it have to be polished? what'd that do?

what's the difference between good stainless steel and bad stainless
steel?

ta
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Old 07-01-2011, 02:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Jan 6, 7:15*pm, zxcvbob wrote:
Gareth Fimlinson wrote:
I have some pots/pans that when I cook fish in them, salmon fillets,
they smell of it afterwards, and seem to absorb it. If I boil plain
water in them then the sides get misted up with fishy stuff, and I can
wash it off then boil it again e.t.c.


I am looking for a cooking pot where that doesn't happen.


Does anybody know
a)why it happens with the pots I have.. what those pots might be made
from that causes it?


b)what pots I could get where that wouldn't happen?


The pots I have I don't know much about them but they're black inside,
so that may say something about the material what it is or isn't..


I am wondering if maybe a metallic one won't have the problem.. but I
don't know.


If they were cheap like £15 then I might buy one and find out.. but
i'm not sure where.. *I am currently in the UK, I see
http://www.johnlewis.com/231034624/Product.aspx* £35
but I don't want to throw money at that and find it keeps the fish
smell..


You want something that's stainless steel and not lined with Teflon.
* Wash it gently with scouring powder and vinegar after you cook
especially smelly fish. Or use "Barkeepers Friend", which contains
an acid (not sure if you can get that in the UK.) *Don't scrub it
too hard or the scouring powder will scratch the finish. (don't
scrub the outside at all.) *HTH


Why not scrub the outside?

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 07-01-2011, 03:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 06:23:28 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Jan 6, 7:15*pm, zxcvbob wrote:

You want something that's stainless steel and not lined with Teflon.
* Wash it gently with scouring powder and vinegar after you cook
especially smelly fish. Or use "Barkeepers Friend", which contains
an acid (not sure if you can get that in the UK.) *Don't scrub it
too hard or the scouring powder will scratch the finish. (don't
scrub the outside at all.) *HTH


Why not scrub the outside?

Because the outside is a mirror finish and an abrasive will scratch
it.


--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.


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Old 07-01-2011, 06:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Jan 7, 10:42*am, sf wrote:
On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 06:23:28 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton

wrote:
On Jan 6, 7:15 pm, zxcvbob wrote:


You want something that's stainless steel and not lined with Teflon.
Wash it gently with scouring powder and vinegar after you cook
especially smelly fish. Or use "Barkeepers Friend", which contains
an acid (not sure if you can get that in the UK.) Don't scrub it
too hard or the scouring powder will scratch the finish. (don't
scrub the outside at all.) HTH


Why not scrub the outside?


Because the outside is a mirror finish and an abrasive will scratch
it.


If I don't scrub the outside, it gets brown and crusty, especially the
saute pan. I'd rather have my cookware scratched.

They're tools. They're not supposed to look like the just came
out of the box.

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 07-01-2011, 07:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 10:21:25 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton
wrote:

On Jan 7, 10:42*am, sf wrote:
On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 06:23:28 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton

wrote:
On Jan 6, 7:15 pm, zxcvbob wrote:


You want something that's stainless steel and not lined with Teflon.
Wash it gently with scouring powder and vinegar after you cook
especially smelly fish. Or use "Barkeepers Friend", which contains
an acid (not sure if you can get that in the UK.) Don't scrub it
too hard or the scouring powder will scratch the finish. (don't
scrub the outside at all.) HTH


Why not scrub the outside?


Because the outside is a mirror finish and an abrasive will scratch
it.


If I don't scrub the outside, it gets brown and crusty, especially the
saute pan. I'd rather have my cookware scratched.

They're tools. They're not supposed to look like the just came
out of the box.

You must store yours out of sight. Mine are on a pot rack and I'd
prefer that they not look quite that bad. Believe me, mine do not
look like they just came out of the box either; but my old anodized
pans are "two toned" and I think they look awful.


--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 07-01-2011, 07:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

Gareth Fimlinson wrote:
ImStillMags wrote:

If you want good pots and pans, get stainless steel. good polished
stainless steel. The good stuff is not cheap but is worth it and
will last forever.


what's this about different types of stainless steel pot.

no teflon (I guess if it's silver inside then it's no teflon and the
black inside ones are teflon, right?)


The best coated stuff is lower quality then the best polished stuff.
There are many levels in between where it is also true. At the bottom
are the teflon frying pans that last maybe a year. No matter the
coating (including anodized) it wears off or a chemical reaction etches
it off.

does it have to be polished? what'd that do?


One of several signs of quality.

what's the difference between good stainless steel and bad stainless
steel?


The best stuff is stainless layered inside and out with copper or
aluminum in the core. All Clad, the various "waterless" brands sold at
home shows have the core go up the sides. The next step down are the
ones where the core is all or almost all at the bottom. The top of the
Cruisinart line.

The bad stuff is all stainless. Lower heat conductivity so it has hot
spots that stick and burn. The cheapest stainless stuff makes it worse
by being thin as well.
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 19:56:21 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
wrote:


The best stuff is stainless layered inside and out with copper or
aluminum in the core. All Clad, the various "waterless" brands sold at
home shows have the core go up the sides. The next step down are the
ones where the core is all or almost all at the bottom. The top of the
Cruisinart line.

The bad stuff is all stainless. Lower heat conductivity so it has hot
spots that stick and burn. The cheapest stainless stuff makes it worse
by being thin as well.


That was nice, short, two paragraph summary. Thanks!

--

Never trust a dog to watch your food.
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default A cooking pot that doesn't absorb the smell of fish when cooking fish?

On Jan 7, 2:01*pm, sf wrote:
On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 10:21:25 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton





wrote:
On Jan 7, 10:42*am, sf wrote:
On Fri, 7 Jan 2011 06:23:28 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton


wrote:
On Jan 6, 7:15 pm, zxcvbob wrote:


You want something that's stainless steel and not lined with Teflon.
Wash it gently with scouring powder and vinegar after you cook
especially smelly fish. Or use "Barkeepers Friend", which contains
an acid (not sure if you can get that in the UK.) Don't scrub it
too hard or the scouring powder will scratch the finish. (don't
scrub the outside at all.) HTH


Why not scrub the outside?


Because the outside is a mirror finish and an abrasive will scratch
it.


If I don't scrub the outside, it gets brown and crusty, especially the
saute pan. I'd rather have my cookware scratched.


They're tools. *They're not supposed to look like the just came
out of the box.


You must store yours out of sight. *Mine are on a pot rack and I'd
prefer that they not look quite that bad. *Believe me, mine do not
look like they just came out of the box either; but my old anodized
pans are "two toned" and I think they look awful.


They hang on the wall. I've got All-Clad that's less than 10
years old. I expect they'll last my lifetime, but they are
somewhat battle-scarred. They've taken way more
damage from the grates on my stove than from the
Bon Ami which which I scrub them.

I've also got some Wearever nonstick aluminum
frying pans. I rotate those out every five years or
so, when the nonstick surface goes. The ones
that fit in the dishwasher are spotty dull gray;
the biggest one is fairly silvery still.

The scratches on the pans are like the wrinkles
on my face: signs of a life well lived.

Cindy Hamilton


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